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Canadian Chess Newsfeed

The CFC received an excellent offer from DGT (Digital Game Technology) to make a purchase of Electronic Chess Sets and Clocks, for tournament use. They are promoting their new line of more affordable, plastic based e-equipment. 

 We are being offered these products at "developmental" prices, that are being offered to many FIDE countries. This is a one time offer. We have received permission to allow our partners to participate as well. It is important to note that you will have to agree that any products you purchase are not to be resold.  

 Our eligible partners are:  

  1. Provincial Associations 
  2. Chess clubs/organizations holding CFC Tournaments 
  3. Organizers holding CFC Tournaments 
  4. Organizers in the process of bidding for upcoming CFC events 
   

We have sent this notice to a preliminary list of eligible partners, but of course we fully anticipate that we have left a number of potentially eligible people off of the list. To become eligible contact Bob Gillanders at the CFC Office, Fred McKim, CFC Treasurer, or Vlad Drkulec, CFC President with your credentials and we’ll approve you within 24 hours. 

 E-mails for all of the above can be found at http://chess.ca/governors-page 

Author: John Upper
Posted: November 9, 2018, 6:28 pm

Our second Canadian Game of the Week is the Round 1.2 game between Canadian Champion WIM Maili-Jade Ouellet and Russian GM Aleksandra Goryachkina at the 2018 Women's World Chess Championship in Khanty-Mansiysk Russia. 

 

The FIDE Women's World Chess Championship runs November 3 - 23, 2018 in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. It is a 64-player knock-out tournament to determine the 2018 FIDE Women's World Championship. All the top women, except Yifan, are competing. Format: 2 game matches with rapid playoffs if necessary. The pairings are 1 vs 64, 2 vs 63 etc. With the sixth-lowest rating, MJ got paired against the #6 seed who outrated her by 409 points, but their first game ended in a draw after both players missed chances. 

MJ had White in game 2 (below). She got a difficult position out of a Nimzo-Rubinstein, and eventually got tangled up defending against Black's pressure on her weak queenside pawns.
Result: Goryachkina advances 1.5 - 0.5.


Links


 
() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "WWCC 2018"]
[Site "Khanty-Mansiysk, RUS"]
[Date "2018.11.04"]
[Round "1.2"]
[White "Ouellet, Maili-Jade"]
[Black "Goryachkina, Aleksandra"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "E56"]
[WhiteElo "2125"]
[BlackElo "2534"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "138"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 d5 6. Nf3 dxc4 7. Bxc4 c5 8. O-O
Nc6 9. a3 {[#]} Ba5 (9... Bxc3 {is an equally popular and viable option.}) 10.
dxc5 $2 {White has tried lots of other moves, though none of them promised a
plus:} (10. Ne2 $5) (10. Qd3) (10. Bd3) 10... Bxc3 $1 {[#] Black hasn't lost a
tempo over 9...Bxc3 since in that line White hadn't (and wouldn't) take on c5;
but now White has three queenside isos to defend.  Stockfish and Leela both
rate this as between equal and slightly better for White, but the further you
follows their lines the better for Black they rate it.  Between humans, Black
scores 68% and Elo +100 from here.} 11. bxc3 Qxd1 {Goryachkina is a grinder.} (
11... Qa5 {is equally popular.} 12. Bd3 e5 13. Qc2 Rd8 14. Ng5 h6 15. Ne4 Nxe4
16. Bxe4 Qxc5 $15 {0-1 (43) Ubiennykh,E (2307)-Kosteniuk,A (2556) Sochi 2016})
12. Rxd1 Na5 {The first of five times Black will play a N to this square.} 13.
Ba2 (13. Rd4 Nd7 14. a4 Nxc5 15. Ba3 b6 16. Ba2 (16. Bxc5 bxc5 17. Rh4) 16...
Bb7 (16... Ncb3 $5 17. Bxf8 Nxd4 {Only move.} 18. cxd4 {is still a position Black could
hope to play for a win.}) 17. Bxc5 bxc5 18. Rd6 $1 Rfd8 19. Rad1 Nc6 20. Bc4
Kf8 21. Rxd8+ Rxd8 22. Rxd8+ Nxd8 23. Nd2 Ke7 $11 {0-1 (51) Bouget,A (2256)
-Favarel,A (2359) Condom 2015}) 13... Bd7 14. Rd4 Rfc8 15. Bb2 (15. a4 $5 {
is a try to wrong-foot Black, but Black just has to take her time and she'll
come out with a slightly better position} Be8 $1 (15... Rxc5 {is fine too} 16.
Ba3 Rc7 17. Ne5) 16. Ba3 Nd7 $11) 15... Rxc5 16. Rad1 Be8 17. Ne1 Nc6 {[#]} 18.
Rc4 ({trading Rs makes it easier for Black's minors to dominate.} 18. R4d2 $5
$15) 18... Rxc4 19. Bxc4 Na5 $15 20. Ba2 Ba4 21. Rd4 Bb3 $1 {Trades White's
better B or pushes it to a worse line; either way, Black increases control
over c4.} 22. Bxb3 Nxb3 23. Rb4 Na5 24. e4 b6 25. f3 Rc8 26. Kf2 Nc6 27. Rb3
Ne8 28. Ke2 Nd6 29. Nd3 {[#]} f5 $6 {I don't understand this move: there's no
need to try force or allow pawn structure changes when Black dominates the
only area of the board with pawn weaknesses.} ({Slow playing with} 29... f6 {
keeps the advantages (play on the c-file) without opening up anywhere else.})
30. Nf2 (30. exf5 $1 $15 {or on the next moves looks sensible, avoiding
another isolated pawn.}) 30... Kf7 31. a4 Nb7 32. Nd3 {[#]} Rd8 $6 (32... Nca5
33. Rb4 Nc6 {testing} 34. Rb3 (34. Rc4 $2 Nba5 {traps the R} 35. Ne5+ Kf6 $19)
34... fxe4 35. fxe4 Nd6 $17) 33. Bc1 ({Again,} 33. exf5 $1 exf5 {should
simplify White's defence. Surprisingly, Stockfish rates this position as equal
after} 34. c4) 33... fxe4 (33... Rxd3 $2 34. Kxd3 Nc5+ 35. Kc2 {and Black has
just traded two active pieces for two poor ones.}) 34. fxe4 {Now White has
three isos to Black's one, but White's can be attacked more easily than the
one on e6.} Nd6 35. Nf2 e5 36. Rb1 Ke6 37. Be3 Rc8 38. Rd1 (38. Kd3 Rd8 39. Ke2
Na5 $17) 38... Na5 39. Kd3 Ndc4 40. Bc1 Nb3 $19 {Threatening ...Nxc1 then ...
Nb2+ wins the a-pawn. White is too tied up to stop it.} 41. Kc2 (41. Ng4 Rd8+
42. Ke2 (42. Kc2 $2 Na1+ {gets an exchange}) 42... Nxc1+ 43. Rxc1 Rd2+ 44. Kf3
Ra2 $19) 41... Nc5 {[#]A picture of Black making the most of the c-file.} 42.
a5 Nxa5 43. Ba3 Ncb7 44. Rd3 Nc4 45. Bc1 Nc5 46. Rg3 Rc7 47. h4 Nd6 48. Re3 Na4
49. Kb3 b5 50. h5 Nc5+ 51. Ka2 Nc4 52. Rg3 Rf7 53. Rf3 Nd6 54. Be3 Ndxe4 55.
Nxe4 Nxe4 56. Rxf7 Kxf7 {[#]} 57. Bxa7 (57. Kb3 {doesn't help} a6 58. Kb4 h6
59. c4 bxc4 60. Kxc4 Nf6 {with an easy win.}) 57... Nxc3+ 58. Kb3 Nd5 59. Kc2
Nf6 60. h6 gxh6 61. Be3 h5 62. Bc5 Ke6 63. Kd3 Kf5 64. Bf2 Nd5 65. Ke2 e4 66.
Bd4 b4 67. g3 Kg4 68. Be5 b3 69. Kd2 Kf3 0-1
merida
46

Tags:

Author: John Upper
Posted: November 6, 2018, 9:07 pm

Our Canadian Game of the Week is the Round 1.1 game between Russian GM Aleksandra Goryachkina and Canadian Champion WIM Maili-Jade Ouellet at the 2018 Women's World Chess Championship in Khanty-Mansiysk Russia. 

 

The FIDE Women's World Chess Championship runs November 3 - 23, 2018 in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. It is a 64-player knock-out tournament to determine the 2018 FIDE Women's World Championship. All the top women, except Yifan, are competing. Format: 2 game matches with rapid playoffs if necessary. The pairings are 1vs 64, 2 vs 63 etc. With the sixth-lowest rating, MJ got paired against the #6 seed who outrated her by 409 points. But ratings don't win games, good moves do, and there were two upsets in the first game of round 1:

  • Iranian WIM Mobina Alinasab (2236) defeated IM Elisabeth Paehtz (2495) with Black.
  • ... and this game.

Links


 
..
() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "WWCC 2018"]
[Site "Khanty-Mansiysk, RUS"]
[Date "2018.11.03"]
[Round "1.1"]
[White "Goryachkina, Aleksandra"]
[Black "Ouellet, Maili-Jade"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D55"]
[WhiteElo "2534"]
[BlackElo "2125"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "91"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

{An interesting and nervy game from both players. White is a 20-year-old GM who outrates
her opponent by over 400 points (quite a lot when the q-value is halved) with
experience playing against the top Russian women. She gets a promising
attacking position out of the opening, misses a knockout blow, and then
mishandles it to the extent that Black emerges with an extra pawn. But when
White is in trouble her class shows itself as she finds a strong drawing
sacrifice.} 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 O-O 6. e3 h6 7. Bxf6
Bxf6 {An opening that got a serious workout in the first KK match, with both
players on both sides.} 8. Qc2 c6 $6 {This is a good reaction to Rc1, but Qc2
gives White the chance to castle long, when Black will lost time creating
counterplay with ...c5 now taking two moves.} (8... c5 {accepting the IQP in a
position where White's Q no longer controls d4 or pressures d5 is good.} 9.
dxc5 (9. cxd5 cxd4 10. Nxd4 exd5 $11) 9... dxc4 {is drawish.}) 9. O-O-O Nd7 (
9... b5 $5 {gives a pawn to open lines. A Novelty, surprisingly.} 10. cxb5 cxb5
(10... a6 $5) (10... Bd7 $5)) (9... Na6 10. g4 c5 11. h4 cxd4 12. Nxd4 Nb4 13.
Qb3 a5 (13... Nc6 $14) 14. a3 $14 {1-0 (62) Andersen,M (2601)-Sundararajan,K 
(2433) Abu Dhabi 2018}) 10. h4 {Maybe the more principled way to play against
the hook on h6 is with an immediate g4-g5 as a pawn sac.} g6 $1 {not what
Black would like to play, since it puts another kingside pawn in the sights of
White's pieces (Qc2 and Bd3), but otherwise g5 cracks open the h-file.} 11. g4
{White has a lead in development and targets on the kingside.} Bg7 $1 12. g5 $6
{this doesn't seem right, restricting White's breaks unnecessarily. Maybe
finishing development with Kb1 and Bd3 or e4.} h5 13. Kb1 Qa5 14. e4 {
Aggressive, but maybe not best.} (14. Nd2 $1 {prepares f4, and readies Nxc4
with tempo on the Q.}) 14... dxe4 (14... dxc4 15. Bxc4 b5 16. Bd3 b4 (16... Rb8
$5) 17. Na4 $1 $11 (17. Ne2 c5 $17)) 15. Nxe4 e5 16. d5 (16. c5 $5 {going for
d6.}) 16... Nc5 $1 17. Bh3 Bxh3 18. Rxh3 Rad8 (18... Nxe4 $1 19. Qxe4 Qc5 20.
Nxe5 Qxf2 {with counterplay on the dark squares.}) 19. Nf6+ Bxf6 20. gxf6 Rd6 (
20... e4 21. Ng5 Nd3 22. Nxe4 Nb4 23. Qb3 cxd5 $11 {liquidates White's center.}
) 21. Nxe5 Rxf6 22. Rg3 Re8 $2 ({Better is} 22... Qc7 {shoring up the kingside.}) 23.
f4 $2 {Not a bad move -- supporting the N keeps White on top -- but White had
a crusher.} (23. Nxg6 $1 fxg6 (23... Rxg6 $2 24. Rxg6+ fxg6 25. Qxg6+ Kf8 26.
Qf6+ Kg8 27. Rg1+ {mates.}) 24. Rxg6+ Kf7 25. Rxf6+ Kxf6 {So far so easy, but
here White must find...} 26. Qc1 {only move.} $18 {very likely the move White missed:
stopping ...Re1 and threatening Qg5.}) 23... cxd5 (23... Kg7 $13 {is better.}) 24. cxd5
(24. Nxg6 {again is good, though not winning anymore.}) 24... Qb4 25. d6 (25.
Rc3 $1 {is strong and hard to see, switching from attacking the K to
controlling files a pushing d5.... and althogh White missed it there, she sees
it sooner than Black.}) 25... Rd8 26. d7 Kg7 $2 (26... Qe4 $1 $14 {forcing the
Qs off makes the Black K happier.}) 27. Rc3 $1 Ne6 28. Rc4 $1 Qe7 29. Qc3 $1
$18 {very nice reoganization of the White pieces.} Kh7 30. Re1 $2 (30. Qf3 $16
{eyeing b7 when ...b6 allows a fork on c6.}) 30... Rf5 $1 {attacking h4.} (
30... Nxf4 $4 31. Nxg6 $18) 31. Rc8 Rxf4 $1 (31... Qxh4 $2 32. Nxg6 Kxg6 33.
Rxd8 Qxd8 34. Qc8 Rc5 35. Rxe6+ $18) 32. Qg3 $6 (32. Rxd8 Qxd8 $13 33. Nxf7 $2
Rxf7 34. Rxe6 Qxd7 $19) 32... Rf6 ({Better is} 32... Qf6 $15) 33. Rec1 Rf5 34. Re1 {only move.}
Qf6 $15 35. Rxd8 $4 (35. a3 $15) 35... Nxd8 36. a3 Qd6 (36... Rf4 $1 $19 {
wins the h-pawn, which might seem like a pawn grubbing distraction with the
white pawn on d7; but Black has d8 under control, and Black isn't worse even
if she has to give up the N for the d-pawn.}) 37. Qe3 Ne6 38. Qc3 (38. Nxf7 $2
Rxf7 39. Qxe6 Qxe6 40. Rxe6 Rxd7 {and Black has decent winning chances.}) 38...
f6 $2 {kicking away the defending of d7 is the right idea, but here it fails
tactically.} (38... a5 $1 $17 {is an icewater-in-the-veins-move -- giving
White a chance to misplace her pieces.}) ({Better is} 38... Nd8 39. Qc8 Qf6 $19) 39.
Nxg6 $3 $11 Kxg6 40. Qc8 Qd3+ 41. Ka2 Rf1 $1 42. Qe8+ (42. Qg8+ Kh6 {only move.} {
transposes.}) 42... Kh6 43. Qxe6 Rxe1 44. Qxf6+ Kh7 45. Qf7+ Kh6 46. Qf6+
1/2-1/2
merida
46
..

Tags:

Author: John Upper
Posted: November 4, 2018, 4:31 am

Carlsen - Caruana, the Women's World Chess Championship, and six FIDE Cadet World Championships make for a busy Best of the Web...


FIDE Women's World Chess Championship
November 3 - 23, 2018. Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia

64-player knock-out tournament to determine the 2018 FIDE Women's World Championship. All the top women, except Yifan, are competing.

Format: 2 game matches with rapid playoffs if necessary.

There were two upsets in the first game of round 1:

  • Iranian WIM Mobina Alinasab (2236) defeated IM Elisabeth Paehtz (2495) with Black.
  • Canadian WIM Maili-Jade Ouellet (2125) drew with GM Aleksandra Goryachkina (2534) -- see annotated game in upcoming post.

Links

Note: Khanty-Mansysk is 9 hours ahead of EST.


2018 FIDE World Cadets Chess Championship
November 4-15, 2018.
Santiago di Compostella, Spain

11-round Swisses to determine the FIDE World Champions in the U8, U10, and U12 age groups in both Open and Girls sections.

26 Canadians are playing:

Sect Rank Name FIDE Rating
U8g 51 Chen, Rae 0
U10g 85 Mok, Gillian Xi-Lin 1084
  31 Qu, Greta 1360
U12g 99 Jiang, Kate Yuhua 1201
  108 Qian, Jessica 0
       
U12 54 Kang, Dorian 1953
  63 Chen, Max 1910
  86 Rusonik, Max 1814
  96 Zhao, Jeffrey R 1738
  101 Windram, James 1704
  121 Guipi Bopala, Prince Eric Jr 1607
  174 Srinivas, Atharva 1275
  197 Fedyushchenko, Alexander 0
       
U10 188 Jiang, Eric 0
  201 Wang, Zhixing (Daniel) 0
  3 Zhong, Kevin 2038
  13 Chandra, Anand Rishi 1953
  17 Atanasov, Anthony 1916
  25 Ning, Eric 1870
  29 Xu, Daniel 1854
  126 Han, Johnathan 1378
  128 Yuen, Noah Nathaniel 1364
       
U8 107 Jiang, Zihao William 0
  114 Mane, Arnav 0
  132 Wang, Xiuqi (Arthur) 0
  136 Zuo, Zichen (Roger) 0

Link
Official Site


2018 World Championship: Carlsen - Caruana

November 9-28, 2018.
London, England

A 12-game match between title-holder Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana, in London November 9-28th, 2018.

Notes:

  • The first World Championship match between the #1 and #2 players since the Karpov-Kasparov matches. 
  • Carlsen's 2835 rating is only 3 points higher than Caruana's, making this the closest Carlsen has come to losing his #1 ranking in 8 years.
  • This is Carlsen's first match against a younger opponent (27 v 26).
  • Carlsen is by far the better rapid player, a significant advantage in a short match with rapid tie-breaks.
  • Caruana had one terrible event in 2018 (TATA Steel, 5/13, 11th) but has been the best player in the world since then: 
    • 1st at the Candidates Tournament (9/14) to qualify for the World Championship Match;
    • 1st at Grenke Chess (+4 = 5 -0; 1 point ahead of Carlsen);
    • 2nd at the US Championship (+6 =4 -1); 
    • 1st at Norway Classic, despite losing the Carlsen in round 1;
    • =1st at the Sinquefield Cup with Carlsen and Aronian;
    • Two silver medals at the 2018 Batumi Olympiad for Team and result on Board 1.

 

Links

Official Site: https://worldchess.com/
World Chess has bought the exclusive rights to broadcast live images and moves from the World Championship, and offer a pay-per-view service. The last two times they have done so, their coverage was marred by technical glitches for the first two days... but was also made free for the first few rounds. Their chess content is good -- Judit Polgar is a serious and enthusiastic commentator -- but they also try to appeal to a broader audience with VR video, spectator interviews, and relentless tweet rehashing. Buyer beware.

New in Chess Preview
New in Chess has produced a free 50-page preview, including annotated games from both players and opinions from various GMs. You have to send them your email address, but can unsubscribe to their mailing list at any time.

Online Commentary
The Chessbrah twitch channel will have live commentary by GMs Eric Hansen and Aman Hambleton. It's free, but you're encouraged to subscribe if you like what they do.

Author: John Upper
Posted: November 3, 2018, 10:14 pm

Our Canadian Tactics come from the 2018 World Youth Chess Championship, currently underway in Greece. It is Black to move in both diagrams. 
Games with notes below...

 


 

The 2018 World Youth Chess Championship takes place October 20-31,2018 in Porto Carras, Halkidiki Greece.

It is an 11-round Swiss in six sections for the FIDE World Championships for players Under 18, U16, and U14 in both girls and open sections.

11 Canadians are playing. Results after 6 rounds (alphabetically):

SNo   Name Rtg 1 2 3 4 5 6 Pts.  Rk. Group
75   Bremner William  2046 0 ½ 0 1 0 0 1.5 90 Open 18
100   Guo Hazel  1262 0 1 0 1 ½ 0 2.5 71 Girls 14
67 WFM He Emma  1674 0 1 1 0 ½ 0 2.5 67 Girls 14
35   Li Yilin  1993 0 0 1 ½ 1 0 2.5 63 Girls 18
16 WIM Ouellet Maili-Jade  2122 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 1 4 23 Girls 16
111   Sivapathasundaram Manojh  1614 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 104 Open 16
47 CM Talukdar Rohan  2279 1 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 4 23 Open 16
9 FM Vettese Nicholas  2338 0 1 0 1 1 1 4 29 Open 14
91   Wang Isabelle  1416 0 0 0 ½ 1 1 2.5 84 Girls 14
78   Yu Cindy  1532 0 0 ½ 0 0 1 1.5 79 Girls 18
86   Zhu Brandon  1914 0 1 1 0 ½ 0 2.5 61 Open 18

Acting HoD: Christina Tao
Onsite HoD: Wendy Batsubuchi



Links


..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "WYCC U16g"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.10.22"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Ouellet, Maili-Jade"]
[Black "Golsta, Ramona"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D40"]
[WhiteElo "2122"]
[BlackElo "1681"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "45"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c5 4. e3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Nf6 6. a3 a6 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. b4
Be7 9. Bb2 O-O 10. Qc2 ({For the past 100 years, the most popular way to play
is to saddle Black with the IQP and press, as in these two games, played 100
years apart:} 10. cxd5 exd5 (10... Nxd5 11. Nxd5 exd5 12. Be2 Be6 13. O-O Rc8
14. Qd2 Bf6 15. Rac1 Qe7 16. Rc5 Bxb2 17. Qxb2 Na7 18. Rfc1 Rxc5 19. Rxc5 Rc8
20. Rxc8+ Nxc8 21. Qc3 h6 $16 {White has the better minors. 1-0 (37) Lasker,
E-Showalter,J Chicago,IL 1918}) 11. Be2 Be6 12. O-O Rc8 13. Nd4 Nxd4 14. Qxd4
Qd7 15. Rad1 Rfd8 16. Rd2 Ne8 17. Rfd1 Bf6 18. Qd3 $11 {1-0 (48) McShane,L 
(2669)-Pritchett,C (2274) Hull 2018}) ({Instead, allowing ...dxc4 results in a
symmetrical position, as in this very old game:} 10. Be2 dxc4 11. Bxc4 b5 12.
Bd3 Bb7 13. O-O Qc7 14. Rc1 Rfd8 15. Qe2 Rac8 16. Rfd1 Bd6 17. h3 (17. Ne4 $14
{freeing the Bb2 as MJ does in her game.}) 17... Qe7 18. Bb1 $6 (18. Ne4 $14)
18... Ne5 $11 {1/2-1/2 (57) Staunton,H-De Saint Amant,P Paris 1843}) 10... dxc4
11. Bxc4 b5 12. Bd3 ({The following was clearly a good lesson for Rubinstein,
who later turned this opening into a Great Game vs Rotlewi.} 12. Rd1 Qb6 13.
Bd3 Bb7 14. O-O Rac8 15. Qb1 Rc7 16. Ne4 Nxe4 17. Bxe4 g6 18. h4 $1 a5 19. h5
f5 20. hxg6 $1 hxg6 (20... fxe4 21. gxh7+ Kxh7 22. Qxe4+ $18) 21. Bxc6 $1 (21.
Qa2 $3) 21... Bxc6 22. Qa2 (22. Ne5 $1 Be8 23. Bd4 {Black has the Bs, but
White's minors and Rs are much better placed.}) 22... Bd5 23. Rxd5 $1 exd5 24.
Qxd5+ Kh7 25. Nd4 axb4 $2 26. Ne6 $1 $18 bxa3 27. Nxf8+ $4 (27. Qe5 $18 {
with mating threats and an extra attacker on c7.} Bf6 28. Nxf8+ Kg8 29. Qe8 {Only move.}
$18) 27... Bxf8 28. Bd4 Qc6 $19 {0-1 (40) Moewig,A-Rubinstein,A Barmen 1905})
12... Bb7 13. O-O Rc8 14. Rfd1 Qc7 (14... Qb6 {looks like the safer square for
the Q.} 15. Qe2) 15. Rac1 h6 16. Ne4 $1 $14 Nxe4 17. Bxe4 Qb6 18. Qe2 Rfd8 19.
Nd4 {There are a lot of forcing continuations here, and Black now goes
catastrophically wrong:} Bf6 $4 (19... Nxd4 $4 20. Bxd4 Rxd4 $18 {only move to
save the Q and the Bb7.}) (19... Ne5 $2 20. Bxb7 Qxb7 21. Nxe6 $16) (19... Nb8
$1 20. Qf3 {and the upcoming trades should burn it down to equality.}) 20. Nxc6
$1 $18 Rxd1+ 21. Qxd1 Bxc6 22. Bxf6 gxf6 23. Qd6 {The pins wins.} 1-0

[Event "WYCC O14"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2018.10.25"]
[Round "6"]
[White "Redzisz, Michal"]
[Black "Vettese, Nicholas"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "E80"]
[WhiteElo "2026"]
[BlackElo "2338"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "46"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. f3 c5 4. d5 d6 5. Nc3 Bg7 6. e4 O-O 7. Bd3 e6 8. Bg5 (8.
Nge2 exd5 9. exd5 Nbd7 10. Ng3 a6 11. a4 Ne5 12. Be2 Bd7 13. O-O b5 14. cxb5
axb5 15. Nxb5 c4 16. Nc3 Re8 17. h3 Bc8 18. Kh1 Qb6 19. Rb1 Nd3 20. Bxd3 cxd3
21. b4 Qd4 22. Nb5 $4 Qh4 $1 $19 23. Kh2 Nxd5 $17 (23... Nh5 $3 24. Nxh5 Bxh3
$3 25. gxh3 Re2+) 24. f4 Ne3 25. Bxe3 Rxe3 26. Rf3 Bg4 $1 $19 27. Rxe3 Bxd1 28.
Rxd1 Qxf4 29. Re4 Qf2 30. Rxd3 Be5 31. Nxd6 Qc2 32. Rxe5 Qxd3 33. Nge4 Kf8 34.
Nb7 Qd4 {0-1 (34) Pelts,R-Shianovsky,V Kiev (Ukraine) 1964}) 8... h6 9. Bh4
exd5 10. exd5 (10. Nxd5 g5 11. Bg3 Nxd5 (11... Nc6 $5)) 10... Nbd7 11. f4 Qb6
12. Qc2 $6 (12. Qd2) 12... Re8+ 13. Nge2 Ng4 $1 $17 {With the white Q on d2
White could castle 00 without suffering a fork on e3.} 14. Bf2 Bd4 $1 15. Bxd4
$2 cxd4 16. Nb5 (16. Nd1 Nc5 17. O-O (17. Bxg6 {fails to several moves,
including} fxg6) 17... Nxd3 $19 {leads to the same tactic we see in the game.})
16... a6 17. Na3 (17. Nbxd4 Qxd4) 17... Nc5 {Should White castle? If so, which
side?} 18. O-O (18. O-O-O {gives Black a choice of winning forks:} Nf2 (18...
Ne3)) 18... Nxd3 $1 19. Qxd3 Rxe2 $1 20. b3 (20. Qxe2 d3+ {leaves Black up a R.
}) 20... Bf5 21. Qf3 d3+ 22. Kh1 h5 23. c5 {.... maybe...?} Qxc5 $1 {Nope. He saw it.
} 0-1
merida
46

..

Author: John Upper
Posted: October 25, 2018, 7:52 pm

The diagrams are both Black to Play; from the games Gordon - Pace and Ramesh - Balasooniya, both played at the 2018 Almonte Open.
Full analysis of both in the game player below.


The 2018 Almonte Open took place October 13 – 14 at the Mill of Kintail Museum and Gatehouse in Almonte, Ontario.

33 players competed. Zach Dukic and David Gordon were =1st with 4.5/5, but they didn't play each other due to earlier draws and a four-way tie for the lead going into the final round.  Christopher Pace, William Doubleday, Dusan Simic, Daniel Xu, and Houji Yao tied for 3rd-7th with 3.5/5.

Alexandre Khan was top U1900 and Herb Langer topped the U1600s.

Note: the first day was played in the Mill of Kintail Museum, an 1830s stone-grinding river mill which has been turned into a Museum, including an exhibition showing off Almonte's most famous son: the inventor of basketball, James Naismith. You can see pix from both days at the link below.

Links


Games

Our Canadian Game(s) of the Week are two crazy slug-fests from the Almonte Open. The first one -- Gordon - Pace -- was with first prize on the line...

..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Almonte Open"]
[Site "Chess.com"]
[Date "2018.10.14"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Gordon, David"]
[Black "Pace, Christopher"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B06"]
[WhiteElo "2255"]
[BlackElo "2250"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "89"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "rapid"]

1. d4 d6 2. Nc3 g6 3. e4 Bg7 4. f4 a6 {[#] Nakamura and Caruana
have both played this as Black, but only in rapid or blitz games.} 5. a4 {
Stops Black's plan of queenside expansion and allows White the most aggressive
set-up with Bc4, but it's not popular. IM Cyrus Lakdawala's "Move by Move: The
Modern" (Everyman, 2012) says: "I have always thought that a4 is medically
unsafe for White and doesn't particularly mix well with the Austrian Attack
set-up...: 1. a4 ruins White's queenside castling option. 2. The game may
transpose to Pirc lines with ...Nf6 and ...c5, in which case Black is handed
use of the b4-square."} (5. Nf3 {is the main line} b5 6. Bd3 Nd7 7. a4 b4 8.
Ne2 c5 9. c3 Bb7 $14 {White has expanded in the center and Black on the
queenside, almost certainly both to White's advantage.} 10. O-O Ngf6 11. e5 Nd5
12. Bd2 (12. Ng5 $5 {aiming for e5-e6}) 12... bxc3 13. bxc3 cxd4 14. cxd4 O-O
15. Ng3 a5 $1 (15... Bh6 16. f5) 16. Kh1 $6 Nb4 17. Be4 d5 $1 $15 {0-1 (49)
Anand,V (2759)-Nakamura,H (2769) Leuven rapid, 2018}) 5... b6 {Now it looks
like Black might try to play a Hippo (a6, b6, e6, d6, g6, with Ns on d7 and e7)
, but f2-f4 before Nf3 gives White much quicker breaks in more typical lines
with c2-c4.} (5... Nf6 {transposing to a Pirc sideline with ...a6 and a4 is
Black's best-scoring continuation.}) 6. Nf3 Bb7 {This is probably inaccurate:
Black isn't going to get to pressure e4 with ...b5-b4 anytime soon, and the
Bc8 can be useful defending both f5 and e6 (especially if White plays the sac
with e5-e6 then Ng5)} (6... e6 $5 7. Bc4 Ne7 8. d5 $1 O-O 9. dxe6 fxe6 10. Ng5
$16) 7. Bc4 e6 {[#] White has a choice of a big squeeze and various degrees of
immediate chaos...} 8. f5 $1 {... and maximum chaos it is.} ({White has a
clear plus in a simpler position after the less-ambitious} 8. O-O d5 $1 9. exd5
exd5 10. Bd3) (8. d5 $1 {is also good.} exd5 9. Bxd5 Bxd5 10. Qxd5 Ra7 $2 (
10... Nd7 $142 11. Ng5 Nh6 12. O-O O-O 13. h3 $14) 11. O-O Nf6 (11... Ne7 $142)
12. Qc4 O-O 13. e5 $1 Ne8 14. Be3 c6 15. Qb3 Nd7 16. Rad1 Qe7 17. a5 $18 {
1-0 (44) Iskandarov,M (2486)-Lomsadze,D (2352) Kesan 2018}) {The game is
really complicated now, with many different captures and pawn structure
changes possible, which is the main reason there are so many variations below.
There are also a lot of "?" over the next few moves. That's not because the
players -- both over 2200 CFC -- are weak, but because Stockfish at 30ply can
find its way through complications better than any human who has ever lived.}
8... d5 $2 {Black has a choice of evils, and this is more evil than most.} (
8... exf5 $142 9. O-O (9. exf5 d5 $14) 9... Nf6 10. exf5 O-O (10... d5 11. Re1+
) 11. fxg6 hxg6 12. Bg5 $16 d5 (12... c6 $2 13. Ne4 d5 14. Nxf6+ Bxf6 15. Bxf6
Qxf6 16. Bd3 $18 {with a ready-made attack, a much better B, a safer K, and a
lead in development with at least one more tempo coming of the Qf6.}) 13. Bb3
$16 (13. Bd3 $16)) 9. exd5 (9. fxe6 $1 dxc4 (9... fxe6 10. exd5 exd5 11. Qe2+
Ne7 12. Bb3 (12. Ng5 $16 dxc4 $2 13. Ne6 $18) 12... Qd7 13. Bg5 $18) 10. exf7+
Kxf7 11. O-O $1 {For the B White has one pawn, a big lead in development, and
a strong initiative against the exposed Black K.}) {[#]} 9... exf5 $2 (9...
exd5 10. Bd3 (10. Bb3 Ne7 $16) 10... Nc6 11. O-O Nxd4 12. a5 $1 $16 {a move
the computers like a lot, but I can't figure out why. Maybe Black is in a kind
of zugzwang, where developing the Ng8 allows Bg5 with threats!?}) 10. Ng5 (10.
Bg5 $14) (10. Qe2+ $1 {gives Black a chance to head for a bad endgame; this
may be White's best, but it's probably not why White played 8.f5} Ne7 (10...
Kf8 11. O-O $16) (10... Qe7 11. Bf4 $16) 11. O-O $16 O-O $2 12. Bg5 Re8 13.
Rae1 $18) (10. O-O $1 $16 Ne7 11. Re1 (11. Bg5 Nd7 12. Bxe7 Kxe7 13. g4 $1 {
is the attacker's way to go.}) 11... h6 12. Qe2 $1 Bf6 $6 13. Bf4 (13. Ne5 $1
$18) 13... Kf8 14. Be5 Bxe5 (14... Nc8 $1 $16) 15. Nxe5 (15. dxe5 $18) 15...
Rh7 16. Rad1 Qd6 17. Qe3 Nd7 18. Nxf7 $1 Rxf7 19. Qxh6+ Kg8 20. Re6 $18 {
1/2-1/2 (37) Hasanova,E (2249)-Lanchava,T (2351) Warsaw 2001}) 10... h6 $1 11.
Qe2+ Kf8 $6 (11... Qe7 $1 $13 {is unclear; here is a forcing line:} 12. Qxe7+
Nxe7 13. Nxf7 $5 Kxf7 14. d6+ Ke8 15. dxe7 Bxd4 $13) 12. Nxf7 $5 (12. Nf3 $14)
12... Kxf7 13. Bf4 {[#]} Nd7 $2 (13... Qe8 $2 14. d6+ Kf8 15. Qxe8+ Kxe8 16.
dxc7 Nd7 17. O-O-O $16 {White has two pawns for the N, but one is the monster
on c7, and since he can't castle Black is a LONG way from getting his Rs into
the game.}) (13... Kf8 {Only move} $13 14. O-O-O Bf6 $1 {a nice reorganization which
comes up in a few lines.} 15. g4 $1 (15. Rhe1 Rh7 $1 $13) 15... g5 16. Be5 $1
f4) 14. Qe6+ (14. Bxc7 $1 Qe8 (14... Qxc7 $2 15. d6+ $18) 15. Qe6+ {Only move} $18 Qxe6+
(15... Kf8 16. Bd6+ Ne7 17. O-O-O $18) 16. dxe6+ Ke8 17. exd7+ Kxd7 18. Bxb6
$18) 14... Kf8 15. d6 $2 (15. O-O-O Qe8 (15... Ngf6) 16. Bxc7 Bf6 {Only move} 17. Rhe1
Qf7 18. Qe2 $6 (18. g4 $5) (18. Kb1 $1) 18... Bg5+ 19. Kb1 Ngf6 $15) 15... Qe8
{Only move} $15 16. dxc7 {Only move} Qxe6+ 17. Bxe6 {[#] Black has a better version of the
endgame in the note to move 13.} Ke7 $1 18. Bd5 Bxd5 {Only move} 19. Nxd5+ Ke6 $1 (19...
Kf7 $1) 20. c4 g5 $1 {[#]} 21. a5 $1 {Activating the Ra1 and creating a third
passed pawn.} bxa5 $1 (21... gxf4 $2 22. axb6 $16) (21... b5 22. Nb6 $14) 22.
Rxa5 (22. Bd2 Ngf6 23. Nxf6 Nxf6 24. Rxa5 Rhc8 $19) 22... Ne7 (22... gxf4 $4
23. Rxa6+ $18) (22... Ngf6 $1 23. Nxf6 (23. Be5 Nxe5 24. Nb6 Nxc4 $1 $19) 23...
Bxf6 24. Bd2 Rhc8 $19) 23. Kd2 (23. Nxe7 Kxe7 24. Bd2 Rhc8 25. h4 (25. Rxf5
Rxc7 $19) 25... Rxc7 26. hxg5 hxg5 27. Bxg5+ Kf7 28. Rxf5+ Kg6 29. Rf3 $5 {
sets a cute trap} Kxg5 $4 (29... Rxc4 $142 $1 $19) 30. Rg3+ Kf6 31. O-O+ $1 {
Did you remember White could still castle?}) 23... Nc6 24. Re1+ Kf7 {[#]} 25.
Bd6 $1 {White's best chance, and adding an exchange sac to the chaos.} Nxa5 (
25... Bxd4 $19) 26. Re7+ Kg6 (26... Kg8 27. Rxd7 Nxc4+ 28. Kd3 $1 Nxd6 (28...
Nxb2+ $4 29. Kc3 Na4+ 30. Kb3 $18) 29. Rxd6 $13) 27. Rxd7 Nxc4+ 28. Kc3 Nxd6
29. Rxd6+ {[#]} Kf7 $2 {Keeps centralized, but gives White an additional check
to reorganize, which happens to be more important here.} (29... Kh7 $142 $17
30. Rc6 f4 31. Nb6 Rae8 (31... Rac8 32. Kd3 $11) 32. c8=Q Re3+ 33. Kd2 Rxc8 34.
Nxc8 Bxd4 $17) 30. Kc4 $2 (30. Rd7+ $142 Ke6 31. Nb6 $13) 30... Rhe8 $2 {
Looks right -- R on open file, square to retreat K without disconnecting Rs --
but it leaves f5 undefended and takes away the only safe square from the Ra8.}
(30... Rhf8 $142 31. Nb6 Rae8 {Only move} 32. Rc6 (32. d5 Be5 $17) 32... Re4 $17) (30...
f4 $142 31. Rd7+ Kg6 32. Ne7+ Kh5 33. Kd3 (33. Kd5 $2 Bf6 $19) 33... Rhf8 (
33... Bf6 34. Nd5 $13) 34. c8=R Raxc8 35. Nxc8 Bxd4 36. Rxd4 Rxc8 $17) 31. Rd7+
$11 (31. Nb6 $11) 31... Kf8 32. Nb6 Ra7 33. Kd5 Rxc7 34. Rxc7 Re2 35. b4 Rb2
36. Nd7+ Kg8 37. Rb7 {[#]} a5 $2 {After so many complications Black must have
been in big time trouble here.} (37... Rxg2 $142 38. Ke6 Re2+ 39. Kxf5 Bxd4 40.
Kg6 Re6+ 41. Kf5 $11) 38. Rb8+ $1 {Safties the R and unpins the b-pawn.} (38.
b5 {may be objectively stronger, but the move played keeps a clear advantage
while ensuring that (at worst) it's a two-result game, which would be very
hard to say after 38...f4.}) 38... Kf7 39. bxa5 Ra2 {Only move} (39... Rxg2 $4 40. a6
Ra2 41. Rb7 {Only move} $18 {the discovered check indirectly defends the a6-pawn.}) 40.
Ra8 {[#]} Bxd4 $4 {wins a pawn, but the R ending is lost.} ({Black can keep
the balance with ...f4 or with} 40... Rxg2 $1 41. a6 f4 42. Ne5+ (42. a7 Ra2 {Only move}
$11 43. Nb6 $4 f3 $19) 42... Bxe5 {Only move} 43. dxe5 (43. Kxe5 f3 44. a7) 43... f3 {Only move}
44. e6+ ({The "fork trick" doesn't work when Black has such a far advanced
passer:} 44. a7 $2 Ra2 $17 45. Rh8 f2 $19) 44... Ke7 {Only move} $11 45. Ra7+ Ke8 46.
Ke5 $5 (46. Rf7 $11) 46... Rd2 {to block on the backrank.} (46... f2 $4 47. Kd6
{#3}) (46... Rg4 $11 {so the R can check along the 4th while pushing the
f-pawn.}) 47. Ra8+ (47. Rf7 $11) (47. Kf6 $4 f2 $19 {The Rd2 stops mate and
the f-pawn promotes with check -- Black wins by one tempo.}) 47... Ke7 48. Ra7+
$11) 41. Kxd4 Rd2+ 42. Ke5 Rxd7 43. a6 (43. Kxf5 {also wins, but there's no
need to keep the star of the show waiting on a5.}) 43... Kg7 44. a7 f4 45. Rg8+
1-0

[Event "Almonte Open"]
[Site "Chess.com"]
[Date "2018.10.13"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Ramesh, Sanjay"]
[Black "Balasooniya, Randika"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E32"]
[WhiteElo "1547"]
[BlackElo "1783"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "62"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "rapid"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Qc2 O-O 5. Nf3 d5 6. Bg5 c6 $6
{Black may have been hoping for a sort of Cambridge Springs, but with all his
pawns on light squares he almost certainly does not want to give up his DSB
with ...Bxc3. More common are both ...c5 (hitting the center now that White's
Q is not defending d4) and ...h6 (currently the most fashionable).} ({Here's
an exciting rapid game from last year between the (currently) #3 and #4
players on the FIDE list:} 6... h6 7. Bh4 c5 8. e3 cxd4 9. exd4 Nc6 10. Rd1 g5
11. Bg3 Ne4 12. Bd3 f5 13. O-O Bxc3 (13... f4 $4 14. cxd5 exd5 15. Nxd5 $18)
14. bxc3 f4 15. Bxe4 dxe4 16. Qxe4 Qf6 (16... Qe7 $5) 17. h4 $1 fxg3 18. fxg3
$13 {For the piece, White has three pawns, a lead in development, and an
exposed Black kingside.} Qf5 19. Qe3 Bd7 (19... gxh4 $2 20. d5 $18) 20. hxg5
Qg6 21. gxh6 Qxg3 22. d5 exd5 $4 23. Rxd5 $1 $18 Bf5 24. Rxf5 $4 (24. Qc5 {Only move}
$18 {the double attack on the Bf5 and threat of Rg5+ forking the K and Q will
cost Black a piece:} Bg4 25. Rg5+ Kh8 26. Rg7 $18 {threatening Qg5.}) 24...
Rxf5 25. Qe6+ Rf7 26. Nh4 Ne5 {Only move} 27. Nf5 $2 (27. Rxf7 Nxf7 28. Nf5 $11) 27...
Qxc3 28. Ne7+ Kh8 29. Ng6+ Nxg6 30. Rxf7 Rg8 $19 31. h7 Rg7 32. Rxb7 Qd4+ 33.
Kh1 Qa1+ $4 (33... Nf8 $1 $19) 34. Kh2 $11 Qe5+ 35. Qxe5 Nxe5 36. Rxg7 Kxg7 37.
Kg3 Nxc4 38. Kf4 Kxh7 39. Ke4 Kg6 40. Kd5 Ne3+ 41. Ke4 {1/2-1/2 (41)
Mamedyarov,S (2799)-Ding,L (2777) Huaian 2017}) 7. e3 Nbd7 8. Bd3 dxc4 9. Bxc4
{If Black's Bb4 was on e7 this would be a relatively common QGD position.} h6
10. Bh4 Qa5 11. O-O e5 $2 (11... c5 12. d5 $1 (12. Ne4 $1) 12... Nxd5 (12...
Bxc3 $2 13. dxe6 $18) 13. Nxd5 exd5 14. Bxd5 $16 {White's Rs come into play
much faster than Black's, not to mention the immediate threat to win the Bb3
with a2-a3.}) 12. Bxf6 $1 Nxf6 (12... gxf6 $2 13. Qg6+ $18 {exploits ...h6.})
13. Nxe5 $18 {White has won a center pawn for free, and is ahead in
development too.} Bd6 14. f4 $1 Qc7 15. Qd3 a5 16. a4 Kh8 (16... Ng4 {hoping
to trade before getting squashed,} 17. Ne4 Bf5 18. Nxg4 Bxg4 19. Nf6+ $1 {
with the e6-pawn missing and ...h6, Black's light squares around the K are too
inviting.} gxf6 20. Qg6+ {wins the pawns with checks and then takes the Bg4.})
17. Rac1 Ng8 18. Nb5 $2 {White has such a big advantage that almost any move
is winning -- including this one -- but this trade reduces the pressure on
Black's position and lessens White's plus.} (18. Ne2 $142 {going for Qb3 to
attack f7.}) (18. Ba2 $142 Qe7 19. Bxf7 (19. Bb1) 19... Qxf7 (19... Rxf7 20.
Ng6+) 20. Nxf7+) (18. Ne4 $142 $1 {is the computer's choice, and (of course)
there are some tricky tactics to see:} Bf5 19. Nxd6 $3 (19. g4 $1 $18) 19...
Bxd3 20. Ndxf7+ Rxf7 21. Nxf7+ Kh7 (21... Qxf7 22. Bxf7 Bxf1 23. Kxf1 $18 {
White's up two pawns.}) 22. Bxd3+ g6 23. f5 $1 $18 {For the Q, White has RBPP
and an initiative.}) 18... cxb5 19. Bxf7 {The discovery on the Q and the
mating combo starting with the fork on g6 leave Black no choice:} Bxe5 {Only move} 20.
Rxc7 Bxc7 21. Bxg8 $1 ({It's tempting to keep the LSB to play for an attack,
but it doesn't work:} 21. Bb3 bxa4 22. Bc2 Bf5 $13) 21... Rxg8 22. Qxb5 Bd8 23.
e4 b6 24. Re1 Ba6 25. Qd7 Bf6 26. e5 Rge8 27. Rd1 (27. d5 $142 Rad8 28. Qa7)
27... Be7 28. Qc6 Rab8 29. d5 $6 (29. Qg6 {followed by f5-f6.}) 29... Bc5+ 30.
Kh1 Rbc8 31. Qg6 Be2 {The players agreed to a draw here, which might be
because of time trouble, or White having too much respect for Black's rating.
Objectively, White's connected passed pawns more than make up for Black's
extra B, and so he could reasonably play on, even against someone rated 200
points higher.} 1/2-1/2
merida
46

..

Author: John Upper
Posted: October 16, 2018, 9:32 pm

 

31 chess tournaments across Canada in October and November 2018. 

Not even one with a "spooky" Halloween theme? Is it because the organizers don't even care anymore?

 

Date Event Location Details Link
October 2018        
         
October 5-7 11th Varennes International l'École secondaire Le Carrefour, Varennes, QC $20,000 guaranteed; 5 round swiss  https://www.echecsvarennes.com/
October 5-7 Markham Open Bill Hogarth SS, Markham, ON 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30; incl. Jr section CFC Discussion Board thread
October 6-8 Maritime Open Championship Saint Mary’s University, Halifax 6 round Swiss; TC: G/2 + 30 http://www.nschess.ca/?p=1265
October 6-8 Alberta Open Championship Calgary Chess Club 5 round Swiss; TC: 40/90 + G/30 + 30s http://www.albertachess.org/2018AO.php
October 6-8 New West Open 2018 Royal City Centre, New Westminster, BC 6 round Swiss; TC: 90 + 30 WestChess
         
October 13 2018 Fredericton Fall Tornado UNB Marshall D'Avray Hall 4 round Swiss; TC: G/60 http://mcc.cdevastation.com/ftonftor18.html
October 13 Octoberfest Active Kitchener City Hall, ON 5 round RR or Swiss; TC: G/25 + 10 KW CC
October 13-14 Almonte Open Mill of Kintail, Almonte, ON 5 round Swiss; TC: 90 + 30 https://eoca.ca/
         
         
October 19-21 Newfoundland and Labrador Open MUN Engineering Blg; St. John's, NL 5 round Swiss; TC: 30/90 + G/30 + 30 http://nlchess.ca/events/
October 19-21 Open d'échecs de Lévis 2018 Patro de Lévis, Lévis, QC Système suisse de 5 rondes; Cad: 30/75m + 45/mat + 30s FQE listing
October 20-21 Aurora Fall Open Newmarket Old Town Hall,  Newmarket, ON 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 Aurora CC
October 20 Alberta Blitz Championship Red Deer, AB 11 round Swiss; TC: 3+2 http://www.albertachess.org/2018ABC.php
         
October 26-28 Edmonton Fall Sectional Edmonton Chess Club 6 player RRs by rating; TC: 40/90 + G/30 + 30s http://www.albertachess.org/2018EFS.html
October 26-28 33rd Jack Taylor Memorial Victoria, BC 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 Victoria CC
October 27-28 Guelph Fall Pro-Am Guelph Universtiy, Guelph ON 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 Chess Talk thread
October 27-28 Manitoba Junior Championship University of Winnipeg 4 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 https://chess.chessmanitoba.org/
         
November 2018        
         
Novembre 2-4 6e Championnat Ouvert de Contrecoeur Centre multifonctionnel, Contrecoeur, QC Cadence: 90m / 30 coups + 30m / mat + 30s FQE listing
         
November 9-11 Remembrance Day Open Mt.St.Vincent U.; Halifax NS 5 round Swiss; TC: 120+30 http://www.nschess.ca/?p=1268
November 10 Robert Breau Memorial TBA, NB 4 rounds; TC: G/60 http://mcc.cdevastation.com/breau18.html
November 10-12 Banff Open Kinnear Centre, Banff, AB 6 round Swiss; TC: 90 + 30 http://www.albertachess.org/2018BO.php
November 10-12 BC Junior Ch. UBC, Vancouver, BC 5 round Swiss; TC: 90 + 30; or Saturday booster event http://www.chess2inspire.org/bcjcc-2018
         
November 16-18 2018 National Capital Open RA Centre, Ottawa, ON 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 CFC Discussion Board thread
November 17 Maritime Scholastic Teams Charlottetown, PEI   http://www.peiyca.ca/calendar-of-events
November 17-18 Aron Kaptsan Memorial University of Winnipeg 6 player RRs by rating; TC: G/50 + 10 https://chess.chessmanitoba.org/?page_id=34
November 17-18 Alberta Junior Championship Edmonton TBA http://www.albertachess.org/Tournaments.html
November 17-18 Nanaimo Winter Open Coast Bastion Hotel, Nanaimo, BC 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 https://nanaimo-open.ca/next_tournament
         
November 24 Oakville Rapid & Blitz Challenge Sandman Hotel, Oakville, ON Rapdi: 25+5; Blitz: 3+2 https://elevatemychess.com/oakvillerapidblitz/
Novembre 24-25 Tournoi Ouvert de Granby Granby, QC Système suisse de 5 rondes FQE listing
November 24-25 Southern Alberta Open Calgary Chess Club 6 round Swiss; TC: 90 + 30 http://www.albertachess.org/2018SAO.php

 

       
Nov. 30-Dec 2 NB Closed & Saint John Open Chinese Community Centre, Saint John, NB

5 round Swiss; TC: 40/100 + G/30+30
http://mcc.cdevastation.com/nbcl18.html

 

 

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: October 12, 2018, 8:43 pm

2018 Olympiad: Canadian Results and Games: Round 4:

After losing both round 3 matches, Canada was paired down and won both round 4 matches by large margins:

  • Canada 3.5 - Colombia (#58) 0 .5 
  • Canada w  4 - Syria w (#92) 0

Notable:

  • Another absurdly smooth win by Nikolay as Black.
  • Bareev shows his class in a complex middlegame.
  • Despite the blowout score for the Canadian women, two of the games were in serious jeopardy, requiring major blunders by their opponents to turn them aound.
  • Nf5 is the winning move in three of the games (Bareev, Demchenko, and (could have been) vs MJO)
  • photo: Lali, Svitlana, Captain GM Gergely Szabo, Maili-Jade, Qiyu. Photo by Paul Truong.

Annotated games below. [edit - game player refuses to show Bareev or MJO games. No idea why...]


Links


..
() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.27"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Gallego Alcarez, Andres Felipe"]
[Black "Hansen, Eric"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E07"]
[WhiteElo "2511"]
[BlackElo "2629"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "91"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "schev"]
[EventRounds "2"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

{A closed Catalan. Black equalizes easily, and neither side gets any chance at
an edge.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 $5 {Eric avoids his usual Grunfeld} 3. Nf3 b6 4.
g3 c6 (4... Bb4+ 5. Nbd2 O-O 6. Bg2 d5 7. O-O Bb7 8. cxd5 exd5 9. Ne5 Bd6 10.
Ndc4 $5 $14 {1-0 (74) Akobian,V (2645)-Hansen,E (2616) chess.com INT 2017}) 5.
Bg2 d5 6. O-O Be7 7. b3 (7. Nfd2 Ba6 8. b3 O-O 9. e4 Nbd7 10. Nc3 Rc8 11. e5
Ne8 12. Re1 Nc7 13. Bb2 c5 14. Nxd5 $5 exd5 15. cxd5 cxd4 16. d6 Nc5 {½- ½ 
(60) Le,Q (2718)-Kovalyov,A (2647) Pan Ams 2016}) 7... O-O 8. Bb2 Nbd7 9. Nbd2
Bb7 10. Ne5 (10. Rc1 Rc8 11. e3 dxc4 12. Nxc4 c5 13. Qe2 cxd4 14. Nxd4 Bxg2 15.
Kxg2 a6 16. Nf3 b5 17. Nce5 Qb6 18. Nxd7 {½-½ Dubov,D (2691)-Korobov,A (2664)
Abu Dhabi 2018}) 10... Nxe5 (10... c5 11. cxd5 exd5 12. Qb1 $6 Re8 13. e3 Bd6
14. Ndc4 Bf8 15. Rd1 cxd4 16. exd4 Ne4 17. Ne3 $14 Ndf6 18. Qc2 Rc8 19. Qd3 g6
20. Rac1 Qd6 21. f3 Ng5 22. Re1 {1/2-1/2 (22) Dobrov,V (2510)-Oparin,G (2609)
Barcelona 2017}) 11. dxe5 Nd7 12. e3 b5 13. cxd5 cxd5 14. Nf3 b4 15. Nd4 Qb6 (
15... Nxe5 16. Nxe6 fxe6 17. Bxe5 Bf6 $14) 16. f4 Ba6 17. Rf2 Nc5 18. Rd2 Rac8
19. a3 Ne4 20. Bxe4 dxe4 21. axb4 Bxb4 {Black has the B pair, but the monster
on d4 is full comp.} 22. Rc2 (22. Rf2 $5 $11) 22... Bd3 $15 23. Rxc8 Rxc8 24.
Rc1 Rd8 (24... Rc5 $5) 25. Rc6 $11 Qb7 26. Qc1 h6 27. Bc3 Be7 28. Ba5 Rd7 29.
Qc3 Kh7 30. Kg2 Bb5 31. Rc7 Qd5 32. Rxd7 Bxd7 33. Bb4 Bd8 34. Bc5 a6 35. Qc4
Qb7 36. Qc3 Qd5 37. Qc4 Qb7 38. Kf2 {Avoiding the repetition.} Bc7 39. Bd6 Bb6
40. Bc5 Bc7 41. h4 Bd8 42. h5 a5 43. f5 Qc8 44. fxe6 fxe6 45. Ne2 Kg8 46. Nc3
1/2-1/2

[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.27"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Preotu, Razvan"]
[Black "Rios, Cristian Camilo"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B43"]
[WhiteElo "2513"]
[BlackElo "2465"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "57"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "schev"]
[EventRounds "2"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

{Razvan gets a promising attacking position on the White side of a Sicilian,
finds a combo to unbalance material and expose his opponent's K, and Black
immediately cracks under the pressure.} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4
a6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Bd3 Nc6 (6... Bc5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. Qg4 g6 9. Qe2 d6 10. O-O Nd7
11. Bd2 Ngf6 12. Bh6 $14 {0-1 (43) Fressinet,L (2687)-Caruana,F (2804) Paris
2016}) 7. Nxc6 dxc6 (7... bxc6 {is also playable,} 8. O-O Nf6 9. Qe2 d5 $14 {
when White usually continues with Bg5 or b3.}) 8. O-O e5 9. f4 Nf6 10. Qf3 (10.
Kh1 Bd6 11. f5 Bc5 12. a4 a5 13. Qf3 $14 b6 (13... O-O $2 14. g4 $16) 14. Qg3
$1 Rg8 (14... Nh5 15. Qh4 $16) 15. Bg5 Qe7 16. Rad1 h6 17. Be3 Bxe3 18. Qxe3
Qc5 19. Qxc5 bxc5 20. Nb1 $1 $16 {1-0 (50) Guseinov,G (2621)-Korneev,O (2618)
Nakhchivan 2014}) 10... Bd6 (10... b5 11. a4 b4 12. Nd1 Bg4 13. Qg3 Bxd1 14.
Rxd1 Nh5 15. Qg4 Nxf4 16. Bc4 Bc5+ 17. Kh1 O-O 18. Rd7 Qc8 $4 (18... h5 $1 19.
Qxg7+ Kxg7 20. Rxc7 a5 $14) 19. Bxf4 {Only move.} $18 exf4 {and e5-e6 will make White's
Q R and B the winners.} 20. Rad1 (20. e5 {unclear.} $18) 20... Qe8 21. Qg5 Bb6 22. e5
Bd8 23. Qf5 g6 24. Qxf4 Be7 25. Qe4 $18 {Vallejo Pons,F (2722)-Nyzhnyk,I (2583)
Bahia Feliz 2011 1-0 (42)}) 11. Qg3 Nh5 ({Other ways to defend g7 leave White
with an initiative and clear play; e.g.} 11... Kf8 12. f5) (11... O-O 12. f5)
12. Qg5 g6 13. f5 {Black's kingside is getting tenderized.} b5 14. Be3 Bb7 15.
Rad1 Nf4 {[#]} 16. Bxb5 $5 {Clearing the d-file for the R.} (16. Bxf4 $5 exf4
17. e5 Bxe5 18. Rfe1 O-O 19. fxg6 $16) 16... cxb5 $1 (16... Be7 17. f6 $16) 17.
Qf6 Bc5 {Only move.} 18. Qxh8+ Ke7 19. Qxh7 Bxe3+ 20. Kh1 {White has RPP for the B pair,
and an exposed black K to attack. Black has to defend precisely, but cracks
immediately...} Rf8 $4 (20... gxf5 {Only move.} 21. Qxf5 Rf8 {Only move.} $16 {with a big
initiative.} (21... b4 $2 22. Nd5+ $18)) 21. Rf3 $1 $18 (21. fxg6 $2 Nxg6 22.
Rf3 Bd4 $14 (22... Bg5 $14)) (21. Rxf4 $1 Bxf4 22. fxg6 $18) 21... Bb6 (21...
Bc5 22. Rxf4 $1 exf4 23. fxg6 Qc8 (23... Qe5 24. g7 $18) 24. Qh4+ f6 25. Nd5+
Bxd5 26. Rxd5 $18) 22. fxg6 (22. Rxf4 $2 exf4 23. fxg6 b4 {Only move.} 24. g7 bxc3 {Only move.} $11
{and White will have to force a perpetual.}) 22... Nxg6 23. Rdf1 $1 Qc4 (23...
Nf4 24. g3 b4 (24... Qc4 25. gxf4 $18) 25. Nd5+ Nxd5 26. Rxf7+ $18) 24. Qg7 Bd4
(24... Kd8 25. b3 Qb4 $18) 25. b3 {Only move.} $18 Qe6 (25... Qxf1+ 26. Rxf1 Bxc3 27.
Qf6+ Kd7 28. Qb6 $18 {and one of the loose pieces will drop off.}) 26. Rf6 $1
Bxc3 27. Rxe6+ Kxe6 28. Rf6+ Ke7 29. Rxg6 1-0

[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.27"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Sanchez, Sebastian Felipe"]
[Black "Noritsyn, Nikolay"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C41"]
[WhiteElo "2424"]
[BlackElo "2482"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "100"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "schev"]
[EventRounds "2"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

{How'd That Happen? A Philidor Defence leaves White with more space and easier
development, until it turns into six major piece ending where Black has all
the trumps, wins by pushing his kingside passers. Nikolay's third win in a row,
all with Black.} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 {Philidor's Defence. Black gives up
central space, but it requires some skill for White to turn that into anything
approaching a win.} 3. d4 exd4 ({Not Morphy's Opera Box game :)} 3... Bg4 $2)
4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Be7 6. Be2 O-O 7. Bf4 Nc6 {[#] With extra space come extra
choices, and White can castle either side.} 8. Qd2 (8. O-O {is also common.}
Bd7 9. Re1 Nxd4 10. Qxd4 Bc6 11. Bb5 Bxb5 12. Nxb5 Nd7 13. Rad1 a6 14. Nc3 Bf6
15. Qd2 Be5 16. Bxe5 Nxe5 {White has more space, better developed Rs which he
can bring into the game faster.} 17. Nd5 Re8 18. Qc3 c6 19. Ne3 Qf6 20. Nf5 d5
21. f4 Nd7 22. Qxf6 Nxf6 23. e5 Nd7 24. Nd6 $16 Reb8 25. c4 Nb6 26. b3 dxc4 27.
bxc4 Na4 28. f5 Kf8 29. Rd3 Nc5 30. Rh3 h6 31. f6 $18 Nd7 32. Nf5 gxf6 33. Rxh6
Ke8 34. Rh8+ Nf8 35. exf6+ {1-0 (35) Fercec,N (2460)-Loncar,R (2368) Pula 2017}
) 8... Nxd4 (8... a5 9. O-O-O Nxd4 10. Qxd4 a4 11. a3 Be6 12. e5 dxe5 13. Qxe5
Bd6 14. Qd4 Bxf4+ 15. Qxf4 Qe7 16. Bf3 c6 17. Rd4 $1 Nd7 18. Rhd1 Nc5 19. h4 h6
20. Nxa4 $16 g5 $2 {Black overloads the Q and wins the Na4, but...} 21. hxg5
hxg5 22. Qh2 {Only move.} $18 {...White has a win on the opposite edge.} Rxa4 23. Rh1
Nb3+ (23... f5 24. Qh8+ Kf7 25. Bh5# {show why White can give up the piece on
a4.}) 24. cxb3 Qc5+ 25. Kb1 {Only move.} Bf5+ 26. Be4 Qxd4 27. Bxf5 {1-0 (27) Perunovic,
M (2565)-Bogosavljevic,B (2561) Kragujevac 2011} (27. Bxf5 Qg7 {stops the mate,
but loses the Ra4 to go a full piece down.})) 9. Qxd4 Be6 10. O-O-O Re8 11. f3
Nd7 (11... a6 12. Kb1 c5 $5 13. Qd2 b5 14. g4 b4 15. Na4 Bd7 16. b3 Bxa4 17.
bxa4 Nd7 (17... Qa5 $2 18. Bxd6 Rad8 (18... Red8 19. Qf4 $1 $16) 19. Qf4 Bxd6
20. Rxd6 Qc7 21. Rxf6 $1 $18) 18. Bxd6 Nb6 19. Qf4 Bg5 20. Bxc5 Bxf4 21. Rxd8
Rexd8 22. Bxb6 Rd2 23. Bd3 Rxh2 24. Rxh2 Bxh2 25. a5 Be5 26. a3 {Fier,A (2624)
-Gelashvili,T (2570) Ureki 2015 0-1 (50)}) (11... a6 12. Bc4 $14) 12. g4 ({Both
} 12. Qd2 {and}) (12. Kb1 {avoid White's next.}) 12... Bg5 {Simple chess:
White has more space, so Black trades his worst minor.} 13. Qd2 Bxf4 14. Qxf4
a6 15. h4 b5 16. g5 Nb6 17. a3 Qe7 {[#]} 18. Rd4 $6 {Is White switching
directions, or just playing some prophylactic moves before going back to the
kingside?} (18. h5 $5 {and computers rate it as clearly better for White, but
Black's flat kingside pawns don't offer any hooks, and the typical g5-g6 then
h5-h6 pawn sac doesn't look like it works either.}) 18... Rf8 $1 {Black spots
a hook to activate his Rs.} 19. Rhd1 (19. Rdd1 f6 $5 (19... f5)) 19... Rae8 20.
Qg3 f5 21. Kb1 fxe4 22. fxe4 Bf7 23. h5 Qe5 24. Qg1 Be6 (24... Bc4 25. Bxc4+
Nxc4 26. h6 $11) 25. Bg4 $2 (25. h6 g6 26. Rxd6 $5 cxd6 27. Qxb6 $13) 25...
Bxg4 $15 26. Qxg4 Qf4 27. Qg1 Re5 28. Nd5 Nxd5 29. exd5 $6 {Fixes the
Iso, but Black's majors control the open files and White's advanced kingside
pawns are dropping.} (29. Rxd5 {unclear.} Rxe4 30. Qa7 Rc4 $13) 29... Qxg5 30. Rg4
Qh6 $1 $17 31. Qa7 Qxh5 32. Rgd4 (32. Rdg1 Re7 $19) 32... Qf7 33. Qxa6 Qd7 34.
Rb4 (34. Qb7 $17) 34... h5 $19 35. Rxb5 Qg4 $1 36. Rc1 h4 (36... Qc4 $1 {
ties White up.}) 37. Rb4 (37. Rb7 h3 38. Rxc7 h2 39. Qxd6 Rh5 $19) 37... Re4
38. Rb3 h3 39. Qd3 (39. Rd3 Qe2 40. Qb7 h2 $19) 39... h2 40. Qg3 Qxg3 41. Rxg3
Rf2 42. b3 Ree2 43. Rh3 g5 44. a4 g4 45. Rh4 Rg2 46. a5 g3 47. a6 Rg1 48. a7
Re8 49. Kb2 Rxc1 50. Kxc1 g2 0-1

[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.27"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Bareev, Evgeny"]
[Black "Martinez Romero, Martin"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D03"]
[WhiteElo "2666"]
[BlackElo "2438"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "121"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "schev"]
[EventRounds "2"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

{A Torre-London System leads to a complicated and unbalanced middlegame where
Black's attempts to stir up piece play leave his position with holes which
White exploits masterfully and eventually creates a zugzwang. See esp. 15.Rae1
and 23.f4!} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Bg5 Bg7 4. Nbd2 O-O 5. c3 d5 6. e3 Nbd7 7.
Be2 Re8 8. O-O e5 9. Bh4 c5 $5 (9... c6 {is much more common} 10. Bg3 (
10. c4 exd4 11. Nxd4 dxc4 12. Nxc4 Nc5 13. Qc2 Qe7 $14 {1-0 (44) Ye,R (2500)
-Chiburdanidze,M (2520) Kuala Lumpur 1994}) 10... e4 11. Ne5 Nxe5 12. Bxe5 Bf8
13. Bg3 Bd6 14. Bh4 h6 $11 {½-½ (73) Kramnik,V (2811)-Radjabov,T (2710)
Shamkir 2017}) 10. dxc5 $14 Nxc5 11. b4 Ncd7 12. c4 h6 13. Qb3 (13. Rc1 a5 14.
b5 d4 15. exd4 exd4 16. Nxd4 Nc5 $14) 13... d4 $6 {Black plays for activity,
but the Iso will be a problem.} (13... dxc4 14. Nxc4 (14. Qxc4 Nb6 15. Qc2
g5 $15) 14... Nb6 15. Rad1 $11 (15. Nfxe5 $6 Nxc4 16. Nxc4 Be6 $13) (15. Rfd1
Qe7 16. Ncxe5 $4 g5 17. Bg3 Ne4 $19) 15... Qc7 $14) 14. exd4 (14. c5 $1 g5 15.
Bxg5 $1 hxg5 16. Nxg5 Re7 17. Bc4 Qf8 18. exd4 {White has more than enough,
since} exd4 $2 19. Rae1 {is close to winning.}) 14... exd4 $14 {White has
a mobile queenside majority and Black's passed d-pawn shouldn't get far.} 15.
Rae1 $1 {This gets the Ra1 off the long diagonal, but don't both c1 and d1
look like they would both leave the Rf1 more active? But White sees that with
Black's Ra8 shut out by the Bc8 that the upcoming R exchange on the e-file
will leave him in charge of the e-file -- currently the only open file on the
board, and the one both sides want to use for their minors.} (15. Nxd4 $2 g5
16. Bg3 Ne4 17. Nxe4 Rxe4 $17) (15. Bd3 $5 g5 16. Bg3 g4 17. Nh4 a5 $5 (17...
Ne5)) 15... a5 {activating the Ra8} 16. a3 (16. Nxd4 Nf8 17. Qd3 axb4 $17)
16... axb4 17. axb4 g5 18. Bg3 b6 $2 (18... g4 {unclear.} $5 19. Nh4 Ne5 $11) 19. Bd3
$1 $16 (19. Nxd4 $2 Nc5 $1 20. bxc5 Qxd4 $13 21. Bf3 Rxe1 22. Rxe1 Qxd2 23. Rd1
Qa2 {Only move.} $14) 19... Bb7 (19... Rxe1 20. Rxe1 Nh5 21. c5 $5 (21. Bd6 $14) 21...
bxc5 $2 22. Bg6 $18) 20. Rxe8+ Nxe8 21. Re1 {White might consider Bc2, Qd3
with pressure on the kingside and on d4.} g4 $2 22. Nh4 {The f5 square is too
big a hole.} Qg5 23. f4 $1 Qd8 (23... gxf3 24. Ndxf3 Bxf3 25. Nxf3 $18 {
White has the B pair, and four isolated pawns to target.}) 24. Nf5 Bf8 25. Ne4
Ndf6 (25... Qc7 26. Qb2 Bxe4 27. Rxe4 $16) 26. Nxf6+ (26. Bh4 $1 $18) 26...
Qxf6 (26... Nxf6 {unclear.} 27. Bf2 Bc8 28. Nxd4 Qd6 $16) 27. Qb2 $18 {There's
no way to defend d4.} Qc6 (27... Rd8 $2 28. Bh4 $18) (27... Bg7 $4 28. Bh4 {
leaves the Q with no safe squares} Qc6 29. Ne7+) 28. b5 Qd7
29. Bf2 Ra3 $2 30. Nxh6+ $1 {Overloading the B.} Kg7 (30... Kh8 31. Bf5 $18)
31. Nf5+ Kg8 32. Nh6+ $1 Kg7 33. Nf5+ Kg8 34. Qe2 Nf6 35. Bh4 ({or} 35. Qe5 $18
) 35... Rxd3 36. Qxd3 Be4 37. Rxe4 (37. Qg3 {unclear.} Qxf5 38. Bxf6 d3 $18) 37...
Nxe4 38. Qxe4 d3 39. Qd5 {Wins, but white had to see the following
series of only moves...} (39. Ne3 Bc5 40. Bf2 (40. Kf2 Bxe3+ 41. Kxe3 d2 42.
Bf6 $18) 40... Bxe3 41. Bxe3 (41. Qxe3 $4 d2 $19) 41... d2 42. Bxd2 Qxd2 43. f5
$18) 39... Qxd5 40. cxd5 d2 41. Ne3 {Only move.} Bc5 42. Kf1 {Only move.} Bxe3 43. Ke2 {Only move.} $19 Kf8
44. f5 Ke8 45. Bg3 Kd7 46. h3 gxh3 47. gxh3 Bh6 48. h4 Be3 49. Be5 Bh6 50. h5
Ke7 51. Kd1 Kd7 52. Kc2 Ke7 53. Kd1 Kd7 54. Bc3 Kd6 55. Bxd2 Bg7 56. h6 Bh8 57.
Bb4+ Kxd5 58. Bf8 Bf6 59. Bg7 Ke5 60. Bxf6+ Kxf6 61. Ke2 {Zugzwang - the K has
to move out of the square, allowing promotion.} 1-0

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.27"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Zhou, Qiyu"]
[Black "Murad, Fatema"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C16"]
[WhiteElo "2207"]
[BlackElo "1649"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "59"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "schev"]
[EventRounds "2"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

{Canada scores 4-0 in a mismatch where they outrated their opponents by 300+ points on each board, and more on their board 1, who was lower-rated than her teammates. But the result could have been very different as Canada was losing on board 2 and down a pawn for nothing on board 4.} 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 b6 5. a3 (5. Qg4 $5) 5... Bf8 $5 {Played more often than you might think, mostly by
theory-avoiders like Yusupov and Vaganian.} 6. Be3 {White wants to avoid
losing tempi with Bf1 moves then ...Ba6, but this is probably not the most
useful other move to make.} (6. b4 $5 c5 7. bxc5 bxc5 8. dxc5 Qc7 $2 9. Nb5 $1
$18 Qc6 (9... Qxe5+ $2 10. Be3 Bxc5 11. Nf3 $18) 10. Be3 (10. Qg4 {unclear.}) 10...
a6 11. Nd4 $2 (11. Nd6+ $1 Bxd6 12. exd6 Nd7 13. Nf3 Nxc5 $2 14. Qd4 $18 {
Forking c5 and g7}) 11... Qc7 12. f4 Bxc5 $14 {½-½ (34) Velimirovic,D (2570)
-Portisch,L (2605) Reggio Emilia 1986}) (6. Nf3 Ne7 7. Bb5+ c6 8. Ba4 a5 9. Ne2
Ba6 10. c3 h6 11. O-O Nd7 12. Re1 g6 13. h4 Rc8 14. h5 $16 {1-0 (67) Benjamin,
J (2544)-Jussupow,A (2580) Dresden 2018}) (6. Bb5+ c6 (6... Bd7 7. Bd3 $14 (7.
Nf3 $14)) 7. Ba4 a5 (7... Bd7 {unclear. Marin}) 8. Nce2 Ba6 9. c3 $14 {1-0 (43)
Morozevich,A (2675)-Vaganian,R (2562) Biel 2017}) (6. f4 Ba6 7. Bxa6 Nxa6 8.
Qd3 Nb8 9. f5 Qh4+ 10. g3 Qg4 11. h3 $5 (11. fxe6 $1 fxe6 12. Nge2 $16 {
White will get the f-file and where is Black's K going?}) 11... Qxf5 12. Qxf5
exf5 13. Nxd5 Kd7 14. Nf3 $16 {1/2-1/2 (74) Samsonkin,A (2594)-Sambuev,B (2632)
Ottawa 2009}) 6... Ba6 7. Nge2 $6 (7. Bxa6 $1 {simplifies and trades the good
B, but also drags the N offside and increases White's lead in development.})
7... Ne7 (7... c5 $14) 8. Ng3 $14 h6 (8... Bxf1 9. Rxf1 (9. Kxf1 {unclear.} c5 $15) (
9. Nxf1 $6 c5 $11) 9... Nd7 10. Qg4 $14) 9. h4 (9. Bxa6 Nxa6 10. Qg4 c5 $16)
9... Bxf1 $14 10. Rxf1 c6 $2 {How will Black get any play without ...c5?} 11.
Qd3 Ng6 $6 (11... c5 $5 12. O-O-O Nec6 $16) 12. h5 $16 Nh4 13. Rg1 (13. O-O-O
$1 Nxg2 14. Bd2 {and White gains more time off the offside Ng2.}) 13... Nd7 14.
O-O-O Qc7 $2 (14... b5 {unclear.} 15. f4 b4 16. axb4 Bxb4 $16 (16... a5 $6 {but
could make it a fight.} 17. b5 $1) (16... Rb8)) 15. f4 $1 $18 c5 16. dxc5
$2 {This capture opens the center and could spark tactics with Nxd5 or f5, but
it gives up most of White's advantage, which is mainly based on Black's minors
having no good squares.} (16. Qe2 $1 {unclear.}  cxd4 (16... Be7 17. Qg4 O-O $18) (
16... Rc8 17. Qg4 $18) 17. Nb5 $1 $18) 16... Nxc5 $4 (16... bxc5 {Only move.} {and White
is still better, but Black can get more play on the b-file this way than she
can on the c-file in the game, unless White tries to blow things up
immediately...} 17. Nxd5 $6 {looks tempting, but Black is OK} (17. Bf2 $14) (
17. f5 $5 Qxe5 $6 (17... Be7 $13) 18. Rge1 Qxg3 19. Nxd5 $1 $18) 17... exd5 18.
Qxd5 Nb6 19. Qe4 Be7 {Only move.} 20. f5 (20. Ne2 {threatening g3} Qc8 $13) 20... O-O 21.
Rh1 (21. f6 $2 Bxf6 $19) 21... Rfe8 $1 $15) 17. Qe2 Be7 18. Qg4 $16 Rg8 (18...
O-O 19. Rh1 Nxg2 20. Bxc5 Bxc5 21. Nxd5 $1 (21. Nf5 $16) 21... exd5 22. Nf5 $18
) 19. f5 Qxe5 {Might as well} (19... O-O-O 20. fxe6 fxe6 21. Nxd5 $18) 20. Bd4
$1 (20. Bxc5 $1 Bxc5 21. fxe6 (21. Rge1 $18) 21... Qg5+ 22. Qxg5 hxg5 23. exf7+
Kxf7 24. Rgf1+ Ke6 25. Rde1+ Kd6 $18) 20... Qd6 21. f6 $1 Nf5 22. Nxf5 exf5 23.
Qxf5 gxf6 24. Bxc5 Qxc5 25. Nxd5 Rg5 26. Qe4 Re5 27. Nxf6+ $1 Bxf6 28. Qxa8+
Ke7 29. Qd8+ Ke6 30. Qd7# 1-0

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.27"]
[Round "4"]
[White "El Yazji, Mada"]
[Black "Ouellet, Maili-Jade"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B84"]
[WhiteElo "1726"]
[BlackElo "2144"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "84"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "schev"]
[EventRounds "2"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

{A close call for Canada. White gets a winning attack in a Schevenningen, and
plays most of it very accurately, but one bad move and Black is equal, and MJ
plays the rest very well to win.} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5.
Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 Nf6 7. O-O d6 8. Be3 Be7 {The game has turned into a
Schevenningen where White is using one of the classical (in both senses)
approaches rather than the very familiar English Attack.} 9. Kh1 (9. a4) (9. f4
{are both more common, though Black is OK on both.}) 9... b5 10. a3 Bb7 11. Bd3
Nbd7 12. f4 O-O 13. Qe2 (13. Qf3 Nc5 14. Bd2 $6 Qb6 15. Qe3 Rfe8 16. b4 Nxd3
17. cxd3 Rac8 18. Rac1 Ng4 19. Qg1 Bh4 $1 20. g3 Bf6 $15 {1-0 (83) Atabayev,M 
(2460)-Sjugirov,S (2647) Kazan 2013}) (13. Qe1) 13... Rac8 14. Rae1 Rfe8 (14...
Qb8 15. Bd2 Qa8 16. Nf3 Nc5 17. b4 Nxd3 18. cxd3 Rc7 19. Rc1 Rfc8 $13 {0-1 (50)
Karthikeyan,M (2432)-Akopian,V (2704) Dubai 2013}) 15. Bd2 Nf8 $5 {Prepares to
retreat the Nf6 if e4-e5} (15... g6 $5) 16. f5 (16. e5 N6d7 $15) 16... Rcd8 $2
(16... e5 {unclear.} $1 $15 17. Nb3 N8d7 (17... d5 $11) 18. g4 $6 d5 $1 $17) 17. fxe6
$14 Nxe6 $2 {If this N was on e5 then Black would be equal, but here
she's lost after...} 18. Nxe6 $4 {Not this.} (18. Nf5 {unclear.} $1 {and White has
too many ways to bring pieces to attack Black's K.} Nc5 (18... Nf8 19. Bg5 $18)
19. Bg5 $1 $18 (19. Nxg7 {is way too hasty, but even this leaves White better!}
) (19. Qf2 $5)) 18... fxe6 $14 19. Qe3 Bc8 {White missed a huge chance with
Nf5, but now she plays really well and is soon winning again.} 20. e5 $1 (20.
Qh3 e5 21. Qh4 Rf8 $14) 20... dxe5 21. Qh3 $1 Rf8 $2 (21... g6 {unclear.} $14) 22.
Rxf6 $1 $18 Bxf6 (22... Rxf6 23. Qxh7+ Kf7 24. Ne4 {Only move.} $18) 23. Qxh7+ Kf7 24.
Qg6+ $6 (24. Rf1 {unclear.} $18) (24. Nxb5 {unclear.} $5 axb5 25. Qh5+ Ke7 26. Bb4+) (24.
Qh5+ {unclear.}) 24... Ke7 25. Ne4 $1 a5 (25... Rd4 26. Bb4+ Rxb4 27. axb4 Bb7 $18)
26. b4 $1 a4 27. Be3 (27. Bg5 $1 $18) 27... Rd4 (27... Rd5 28. Bg5 $1) 28. c3
$1 (28. Qh7 Rf7 29. Bxb5 Bb7 30. Bxd4 exd4 $18) 28... Rd5 (28... Rxd3 29. Bc5+
$18) 29. Bc5+ (29. Be2 Kd8 $18) 29... Rxc5 30. Nxc5 Bd7 {White has played
the past 10 moves much better than her rating, but one weak move gives away
her whole advantage.} 31. Nxd7 $4 (31. Be4 {unclear.} $18) (31. h3 {unclear.} e4 32. Qxe4
Bxc3 33. Nxe6 $18) (31. c4 {unclear.} $16) 31... Qxd7 {Only move.} $11 {Material is equal, and
although Black's pawn structure looks terrible, everything is defended and
White's c-pawn is weak.} 32. Qe4 (32. c4 Rd8 33. Bf1 Qd2 {and Black has
threats.}) 32... Rd8 33. Rd1 (33. Be2 $5 $11) 33... Qd5 $1 $15 34. Qxd5 (34.
Qe2 e4 35. Bc2 Qc4 (35... Qa2 36. Qxb5 $11) 36. Qxc4 Rxd1+ 37. Bxd1 bxc4 38.
Bxa4 $11) 34... Rxd5 35. Be2 e4 $1 36. Rc1 e3 37. Kg1 Kd6 38. Kf1 Be5 39. g3
Rd2 40. c4 $4 (40. Bxb5 {unclear.} $15 Rxh2) 40... Bb2 {Only move.} $19 41. Rd1 bxc4 42. Ke1 c3
0-1

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.27"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Demchenko, Svitlana"]
[Black "Al-Mahmoud, Rola"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B84"]
[WhiteElo "2134"]
[BlackElo "1795"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "79"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "schev"]
[EventRounds "2"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

{A second Schevenningen, and a second game where Black hands the f5 square to White. This time White plays Nf5 and Black is crushed.} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Be2 a6 7. a4 {Restricting
Black's queenside play (...b5), which was how Karpov played this. A much more
aggressive continuation involves f4 and Qe1-g3 or a pawn storm with g2-g4;
for example} (7. f4 Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. Be3 Qc7 10. g4 Re8 11. g5 Nfd7 12. Bd3
Nc6 13. Qh5 g6 14. Qh4 Bf8 15. Rf3 Bg7 16. Nde2 b5 17. Rh3 Nf8 18. f5 Ne5 19.
f6 $18 {1-0 (35) Kasparov,G (2775)-Anand,V (2725) Moscow 1996}) 7... Be7 8. O-O
O-O 9. Be3 Qc7 10. f4 Nbd7 (10... Nc6 {is more common. In part, it hits the
centre more directly, and it also leaves a retreat square for the Nf6 if White
hits it with a pawn via g2-g4-g5 or e4-e6.}) 11. Bf3 (11. a5 $6 b5 $1) (11. g4
$5 d5 (11... Nb6 $2 12. g5 Nfd7 13. a5 Nc4 14. Bxc4 Qxc4 15. f5 $16) 12. e5 $14
(12. exd5 $5 Nxd5 13. Nxd5 exd5 {1/2-1/2 (53) Kovacevic,A (2575)-Ivanovic,B 
(2415) Cetinje 2009})) 11... Nb6 12. Kh1 Nc4 13. Bc1 Bd7 (13... e5 14. Nde2
exf4 15. Nxf4 Be6 16. b3 Ne5 17. Bb2 Rac8 18. Qe2 Rfe8 19. Rad1 Qc5 20. Rfe1
Bd8 21. Nd3 Nxd3 22. Rxd3 Nd7 23. e5 Nxe5 24. Ne4 Qb4 25. Bxe5 dxe5 26. Nd6
Rxc2 27. Qd1 Rf8 28. Nxb7 {Garcia,G (2400)-Ftacnik,L (2515) New York 1986 1/
2-1/2 (64)}) 14. Qe1 Rac8  (14... Qc5 15. Qf2 $11) 15. b3 {Now both sides miss some game winning/losing tactics.} Qc5 $4 (15... Na5 16. Bb2 $14) 16. Nce2 $4 (16. Nde2 $18 Nb6 (16... Ne3 17. b4 {Only move.} Qa7 (17... Qb6 18. a5 $18) 18. Qf2 {Only move.} $18 {pins and wins the N.}) 17. a5 Na8 18. e5 $1 (18. Ba3 Qc7 19. e5 $18) 18... dxe5
19. Ba3 {skewers the Be7.}) 16... e5 $16 17. bxc4 exd4 18. Bb2 Qxc4 19. Nxd4 Bxa4 $4 (19... Rfe8 {unclear.} $13) 20. Nf5 $18 {As in the MJO game, the f5 square is worth at least a pawn in the Scheveningen} Qe6 (20... Rfe8 21. Qg3
Bf8 (21... g6 22. Nxe7+ Rxe7 23. Bxf6 $18) 22. Bxf6 $18 (22. Nxg7 $18)) 21.
Rxa4 Rxc2 22. Bc3 Rc8 23. Nd4 Qd7 24. Ra3 d5 25. Nxc2 dxe4 26. Rb3 (26. Bxf6
{unclear.} $18) 26... exf3 27. Rxf3 Qd5 28. Rb1 Ne4 29. Ne3 Qc6 30. Bd4 b5 31. Nf5
Bf8 32. Re3 Nd6 33. Nxd6 Bxd6 34. Rc3 Qb7 35. Rxc8+ Qxc8 36. Rc1 Qa8 37. Qg3
Bf8 38. f5 Qe4 39. Bxg7 $1 Bxg7 40. Rc8+ 1-0

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.28"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Agbabishvili, Lali"]
[Black "Aborova, Sabrina"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "E60"]
[WhiteElo "2128"]
[BlackElo "1685"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "89"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "schev"]
[EventRounds "2"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

{A second close call for Canada. Lali gets a comfortable position, but
overextends her queenside and loses her d4-pawn for nothing. Luckily, Black
misses a back-rank mate tactic to blunder back a pawn (Bxd5), after which the
major piece ending is clearly in White's favour. Lali plays the rest
purposefully and wins.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d6 5. e3 O-O 6.
Be2 c5 7. O-O cxd4 (7... Nc6 8. d5 Na5 {is a more combative line for
Black, which also scores better than ...d5.} 9. a3 e6 10. Nd2 a6 11. b4 Nxc4
12. Nxc4 Nxd5 13. Nxd5 exd5 (13... Bxa1 $2 14. Ndb6 $18) 14. Nb2 Be6 15. Bf3 c4
16. Bxd5 c3 17. Ra2 {with an interesting mess in: Pantsulaia,L (2606)-Short,N 
(2674) Kolkata 2014 ½-½ (43)}) 8. exd4 d5 ({Here's a game which shows how
difficult it can be for Black to stir up play if White just plays super-solid:
} 8... Bg4 9. h3 Bxf3 10. Bxf3 Nc6 11. Be3 Nd7 12. Qd2 Rc8 13. Rad1 a6 14. Rfe1
Re8 15. Nd5 Nf6 16. Nb4 a5 17. Nc2 d5 18. b3 a4 19. Nb4 axb3 20. axb3 {1/2-1/2
(20) Dreev,A (2606)-Amonatov,F (2598) Krasnoyarsk 2007}) 9. b3 Nc6 10. Bb2 b6 (
10... Bg4 {looks OK.}) 11. Ne5 $14 Bb7 12. Bf3 e6 {[#]} 13. Nxc6 $6 {White
plays to activate her queenside majority, but this helps Black.} (13. Re1 $5) (
13. cxd5 Nxd5 14. Nxd5 exd5 {looks like the kind of advantage -- symmetrical,
one tempo up -- Ulf Andersen would win as White.}) 13... Bxc6 14. b4 $6 Rc8 $15
15. b5 (15. c5 {this wouldn't be bad if White's Bb2 was on g3, but on b2 it
makes it harder to support the queenside pawns.} bxc5 16. dxc5 (16. b5 $2 cxd4
$19) 16... Rb8 $17 (16... d4 $17)) 15... Ba8 16. Ba3 (16. cxd5 Nxd5 {is a good
IQP for Black.}) 16... Re8 17. c5 {Only move.} bxc5 18. Bxc5 Qa5 19. Qb3 Nd7 $1 $17 20.
Bb4 Qb6 21. Rad1 {[#]} Rc4 $1 $17 (21... Bxd4 $4 22. Na4 $16 {and Black has to
give the B for two pawns.}) 22. Be2 Rxd4 23. Na4 Qb8 24. Nc5 Nxc5 (24... Rxd1
$5 25. Rxd1 Nb6 26. Bf1 $19) 25. Bxc5 $17 Rxd1 26. Rxd1 Bf8 27. Bxf8 Rxf8 $17 {
Black is just up a pawn.} 28. Bf3 Rc8 29. h4 {The standard way to stir up
trouble... (esp. when nothing else will)} Qc7 30. h5 Qc4 31. Qb2 Qc3 32. Qe2 (
32. Qxc3 Rxc3 33. Rd4 Ra3 $17) 32... Rc4 (32... Bb7 33. g3 $17) 33. h6 {[#]}
Bb7 $2 (33... Kf8 {unclear.}) (33... Rc5 {unclear.}) 34. Bxd5 $1 $11 {Recovering the pawn
and forcing Black into a major piece ending.} Bxd5 35. Rxd5 Rc8 $6 (35... Kf8
$5 36. Rd7 (36. Rd8+ Ke7 37. Rh8 $2 Rh4 $1 $19) 36... Ke8 37. Rxa7 Rh4 $11) (
35... Qc1+ $2 {hangs the R} 36. Rd1 Qxh6 37. Qxc4) 36. Rd1 $16 e5 $6 {[#]This
gives Black one more loose bit to defend.} 37. a4 {White has more than one way
to win. Keeping the Qs on makes the h6-pawn a constant mating threat, but the
extra firepower on the board also increases the chance of a tactial oversight
by White.} (37. Qd2 $1 {exchanging Qs would allow Rd7 and White's queenside
pawns march in, so} Qc7 38. Qd6 $18) 37... Re8 38. Qe4 Qc5 39. Qh4 Qb6 40. Rd7
e4 41. Re7 Rc8 42. Qxe4 ({or} 42. Qf4 $1) 42... Rc1+ 43. Kh2 Qb8+ 44. g3 Rc8
45. Qd4 1-0
merida
46
..
Author: John Upper
Posted: October 4, 2018, 7:02 pm

In Round 3 the Canadian teams played India and the USA:

  • Men lost to #5 India: +0 =1 -3  -- Hansen lost to Anand, Bareev with the draw.
  • Women lost to #10 USA: +1 =1 -2 -- MJ defeated 2017 US Champ Sabina Foisor with Black.

photo: Canadian women (and Captain GM Gergley Szabo) vs the USA. photo by Alina L'Ami

Links


..
() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.26"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Hansen, Eric"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C70"]
[WhiteElo "2629"]
[BlackElo "2771"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "66"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

{BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR
Eric gets White against one of the three living legends in Batumi (Kramnik and Ivanchuk are the others), and gets a lesson in dynamic central play. }
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 {Steinitz played this against the Lopez, but
it's still called the "Smyslov variation". "He played the one thing I hadn't
prepared for" - Hansen.} 4. c3 {This is currently more popular than the
historically most-played move 4.d4} ({Here's Smyslov against a 13-year old
Kasparov. Garry gets a very good position, but falls apart quickly after
Smyslov's surprise 21...g5 starts some unexpected counterplay:} 4. d4 exd4 5.
Nxd4 Bg7 6. Be3 Nf6 7. Nc3 O-O 8. O-O Re8 (8... Ne7 9. Qd2 d5 {0-1 (43)
Englisch,B-Steinitz,W London 1883; this is the famous game that every book
uses to illustrate how to win an endgame with BB vs NB.}) 9. f3 Ne5 10. h3 a6
11. Be2 d5 $6 (11... d6 $1 $11) 12. f4 Nc4 13. Bxc4 dxc4 14. Qf3 c5 15. Nde2
Bd7 16. e5 Bc6 17. Qf2 $16 Nd7 18. Bxc5 Nxc5 19. Qxc5 Rc8 20. Rad1 Qh4 21. Qe3
g5 $5 22. Nd5 gxf4 23. Rxf4 Qg5 24. Nf6+ Kh8 25. Qf2 Rxe5 26. Nd4 $4 Bxf6 27.
Rxf6 Bxg2 28. Kh2 Re3 29. Qxg2 Qxf6 30. Qxb7 Qf4+ {0-1 (30) Kasparov,G-Smyslov,
V Leningrad (Russia) 1975}) 4... a6 5. Ba4 (5. Bxc6 dxc6 6. Nxe5 Qg5 $15) 5...
Bg7 6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 exd4 8. cxd4 d6 9. h3 Nf6 (9... Nge7 10. O-O O-O 11. Re1
Na5 12. Bc2 c5 13. Nc3 cxd4 14. Nxd4 Bb7 15. Bg5 h6 16. Bh4 Re8 17. Nd5 Bxd5
18. exd5 Qb6 19. Nf3 (19. Ne6 $13) 19... Qb7 $11 {0-1 (27) Najer,E (2679)
-Grischuk,A (2737) Doha (blitz) 2016}) 10. O-O O-O {[#]Classical center, safe
K, sensible places to put your pieces -- what more could White ask for?} 11.
Re1 {White has previously reached this position a tempo down (having played
d2-d3-d4 rather than d2-d4) and that did not go well either in Romanishin,O (2580)-Dorfman,J 
(2515) Lvov (Ukraine) 1984 (0-1, 31)} (11. Bg5 $5 h6 12. Bh4 g5 13. Bg3 g4 $5) 11... Bb7
12. Nbd2 Nb4 13. Nf1 c5 (13... Nxe4 $4 14. a3 $18 {and the Nb4 can't retreat
without losing the Ne4.}) (13... Bxe4 14. Rxe4 Nxe4 15. a3 $1 (15. Qe1 $6 Nxf2
$14) 15... Nc6 16. Bd5 $16 {is the fork we saw earlier/}) ({So} 13... a5 $1 {
threatens to take on e4, as well as ...a4, kicking around the B.}) 14. a3 Nc6
15. d5 Nd4 {move the Nd4 back to d7 and it would be a pretty standard Benoni.}
16. Nxd4 cxd4 17. Qxd4 $6 {"I was a bit surprised he took it" - Anand} ({
Rather than the game move, which opens lines for both black Bs, maybe White
should try to play around the d4 pawn with} 17. Nh2 $5 Nd7 18. Nf3 Qb6) 17...
Nxd5 18. Qd3 Nb6 {[#]} 19. Rd1 (19. Bf4 {is the move White obviously want to
play; it allows Black to take on b2 and a3, but that leaves his kingside dark
squares weak:} d5 (19... Bxb2 20. Rad1 Bxa3 $2 21. Nh2 {and Ng4 will give
White an attack.}) 20. Qg3 Re8 21. Rad1 (21. e5 Nc4 22. Ne3 $13) 21... Bxb2 22.
exd5 Rxe1 23. Rxe1 Bxa3 24. Bc7 Qf6 25. Be5 Qd8 (25... Qe7 $2 26. Ne3 $18 {
crushes with Nf5 and d6.}) {and White can take a draw with} 26. Bc7 $11 ({
or play for the attack with} 26. d6 $1 $16)) 19... Rc8 20. Ng3 (20. Ne3 Qh4 21.
f3 d5 22. Nxd5 Bxd5 23. exd5 Rfe8 24. Be3 Bxb2 (24... Nc4 $1) 25. Bxb6 (25. Ra2
Nc4 $13) 25... Bxa1 26. Rxa1 Re1+ 27. Rxe1 Qxe1+ 28. Kh2 Qe5+ 29. f4 {Only move.} $16 {
gives up a pawn to escape the back-rank tactics.}) 20... Nc4 21. Rb1 h5 22. f3
Qb6+ {"The N doesn't belong on g3, the R doesn't belong on d1.... we were both
surprised at how good it became [for Black] and very fast" - Anand} 23. Kh1 d5
$1 $17 {A strong temporary pawn sac that opens lines in the center to gain
time off White's Q.} 24. exd5 Rfd8 25. Bf4 (25. Bg5 $4 Rxd5 {forks the Q and
Bg5.}) (25. Qe4 Bxd5 (25... Qf2 26. Qe1 Qxe1+ 27. Rxe1 Rxd5 $15) 26. Rxd5 Re8
{Only move.} 27. Qd3 Re1+ 28. Nf1 {Only move.} Qf2 29. Bd2 (29. Bf4 Nxb2 30. Rxe1 {Only move.} Nxd3 31. Bg3
Qb2 32. Rxd3 Bc3 $1 $17) 29... Nxd2 30. Rxe1 Qxe1 31. Qxd2 Qxf1+ 32. Kh2 $15) (
{"I don't see that he has any way to save himself; maybe takes on c4 and Qe2,
but he's going to be worse anyway" - Anand} 25. Bxc4 bxc4 26. Qe4 (26. Qe2 Rxd5
$17) 26... Bxd5 $1 $17 {is similar to the above line.}) 25... Qf6 $1 (25...
Nxb2 $2 26. Rxb2 Bxb2 27. d6 {White has a winning attack; e.g.} Kg7 28. Nxh5+
$1 $18) 26. Bc1 Rxd5 27. Qe2 Re5 28. Qf2 Rce8 29. Bxc4 bxc4 30. Nf1 ({White
would actually be better here... if only his B was on c3. :) But,} 30. Bd2 {
invites a pretty finish} h4 31. Nf1 Re2 32. Qg1 Qxf3 $1 $19) 30... Be4 31. Ra1
Bd3 32. Ne3 Qb6 33. Re1 R5e6 {There are too many pins, and ...Bd4 will be one
more.} 0-1

[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.26"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Sasikiran, Krishnan"]
[Black "Hambleton, Aman"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B49"]
[WhiteElo "2672"]
[BlackElo "2492"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "55"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

{Aman play the Taimanov against an opponent nearly 200 points higher-rated, and just like his game against Shirov he equalizes comfortably. However, here he plays like he is either afraid or unwell -- and between move 14-20 his position gets more uncomfortable until Aman is looking for a way to sac for a fortress (!?). White avoids that line, and a few moves later, Aman blunders terribly.
IMO, a much more disturbing loss than in round 1.}  1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be3 a6 {[#]Aman used
to always play the French, but got his final GM norm when he switched to the
Taimanov (see inserted games).} 7. a3 (7. Qf3 Bd6 8. O-O-O Be5 9. g3 Nge7 10.
Qe2 b5 11. f4 Bxd4 12. Bxd4 Nxd4 13. Rxd4 Rb8 14. e5 Bb7 15. Bg2 Bxg2 16. Qxg2
b4 $11 {0-1 (38) Shirov,A (2693)-Hambleton,A (2434) Reykjavik 2017}) 7... b5 8.
Nxc6 Qxc6 9. Be2 Bb7 10. Qd2 (10. O-O Bd6 11. Qd4 e5 12. Qd3 Nf6 13. Rad1 Bc5
14. Nd5 Nxd5 15. exd5 Qd6 16. Bxc5 Qxc5 17. c4 bxc4 18. Qxc4 Qxc4 19. Bxc4 Rc8
20. Bd3 $11 {1/2-1/2 (72) Motylev,A (2675)-Hambleton,A (2474) London 2017})
10... Rc8 11. Rd1 Nf6 12. Bf3 b4 13. axb4 Bxb4 14. O-O $11 (14. e5 Nd5 15. Bxd5
exd5 $11) 14... Bxc3 15. bxc3 {[#]It might be worth noting that there are many
lines from here that result in materially unequal but drawish positions with
opposite-coloured Bs.} O-O (15... Qxc3 $1 {looks like comfortable equality:}
16. Qd6 (16. Qxc3 Rxc3 17. Rb1 Bc8 $11) 16... Qc7 17. Qxc7 (17. Qb4 a5 18. Qa3
(18. Qb2 O-O $15) 18... Bxe4 $15) (17. Bf4 Qxd6 18. Rxd6 (18. Bxd6 Nxe4 $17)
18... Bxe4 $15) 17... Rxc7 18. Rb1 Bc8 $11 (18... e5 $11)) 16. e5 Nd5 (16...
Ne4 $6 {might be playable, but looks squirmy after} 17. Qd3) 17. Bd4 a5 18. Ra1
Ba6 $2 (18... Ra8 19. Ra3 Qc7 20. Rfa1 Rfb8) 19. Rfe1 a4 20. Bxd5 (20. Re4 $5
Ne7 21. Rg4) 20... Qxd5 (20... exd5 21. Qg5 $14) 21. Rxa4 Bb7 22. f3 {[#]} Bc6
$5 {If you're looking only at the computer evals, then this -- and White's
responses for the next half-dozen moves -- are all blunders.} 23. Rb4 (23. c4
Qxd4+ 24. Qxd4 Bxa4 {computers rate this around +3, but both players thought
this was a (near) fortress for Black. Instead, White just keeps manoeuvering,
and Black soon makes a horrible blunder.}) 23... Rb8 24. Ra1 h6 25. h4 Rfc8 26.
Kh2 Re8 27. Qe3 Bb5 $4 28. Rab1 1-0

[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.26"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Harikrishna, P."]
[Black "Preotu, Razvan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B53"]
[WhiteElo "2743"]
[BlackElo "2513"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "65"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. Nf3 c5 2. e4 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4 Nc6 5. Qe3 $5 Nf6 6. Be2 Bg4 7. O-O {
[#] I thought White might just have been playing junk to get Black out of book,
but he's played this against a fellow 2700+ player.} e6 (7... g6 8. Rd1 Bxf3 9.
Bxf3 Bg7 10. c4 Qc7 11. Nc3 Ne5 12. b3 Nxf3+ 13. Qxf3 O-O 14. Be3 Qa5 15. Rac1
a6 16. Bd2 Rfc8 17. h3 b5 18. Nd5 (18. e5 $1 {is a neat tactic:} dxe5 19. Na4
$1 Qd8 (19... b4 20. a3 $16) (19... Qc7 20. cxb5 $18) 20. Be3 $18 {with a
double threat to the Qd8 and Nb6 fork.}) 18... Qd8 19. Be3 Nxd5 20. cxd5 $11 {
1-0 (33) Harikrishna,P (2732)-Navara,D (2727) Prague (rapid) 2018}) 8. Rd1 Qb8
9. c4 Be7 10. Nc3 O-O 11. b3 Bd8 12. Na4 (12. Ba3 Bb6 13. Qd2 Rd8 {and White
keeps squeezing.}) 12... d5 $1 13. h3 {[#]} Bh5 (13... Bxf3 14. Bxf3 d4 15. Qe2
Nd7 {White has the Bs, but central cloggage and the d4 pawn are some comp.
White could continue with Bg4, maybe Nb2-d3 and aim to open the kingside with
f2-f4.}) 14. g4 (14. exd5 $1 {forces Black to dance at the gunslingers ball}
exd5 15. cxd5 Re8 16. Qd2 Ne4 17. Qf4 Bc7 18. Qh4 Nf6 19. Bg5 Rxe2 {with a
sharp position; e.g.} 20. Bxf6 Bxf3 21. Qg5 g6 (21... Qf8 $142 $16) 22. gxf3 (
22. Qh6 $4 Bh2+ $19 {is mating:} 23. Kf1 (23. Kh1 Bxg2+ 24. Kxg2 Qg3+ $19)
23... Rxf2+ {Only move.} 24. Kxf2 Qg3+ $19) 22... Bf4 23. Qh4 Be3 24. dxc6 (24. d6) 24...
Bxf2+ 25. Qxf2 Rxf2 26. Rd8+ $18) 14... Bg6 15. e5 Ne4 16. Ba3 Be7 $2 (16...
Re8 17. cxd5 exd5 18. Rxd5 Bc7 (18... Bf6 $5) 19. Bb2 (19. Bb5 $13) 19... Nb4
$13 {and the threats on d5 and c2 cost White an exchange.}) 17. cxd5 exd5 18.
Bxe7 Nxe7 19. Nc5 Rd8 20. Rac1 {[#]} (20. Nh4 $2 Nxc5 21. Qxc5 Qxe5) 20... Nc6
$4 (20... Nxc5 $142) (20... h6 $142 21. e6 $5 (21. Bd3 $5)) 21. Na6 $1 $18 {
Certainly missed by Razvan. Now nothing works.} Qc8 (21... bxa6 22. Rxc6 Rc8
23. Rxc8+ Qxc8 24. Rxd5 Nc3 25. Rd6 Nxe2+ 26. Qxe2 $18) 22. Nd4 Nxd4 (22... f5
23. Nb4 $18 {I don't recall ever seeing this way of attacking c6}) (22... bxa6
23. Nxc6 $18 {threatens Nxd8 and Ne7+.}) 23. Rxd4 $1 (23. Rxc8 $4 Nxe2+ 24.
Qxe2 Raxc8 $19) 23... bxa6 (23... Qd7 24. Nc7 Rac8 25. Nxd5 $18) 24. Rxc8 Raxc8
25. Bxa6 Rc3 26. Qe1 Rxh3 27. Qa5 Rf8 28. Rxd5 h5 29. Bf1 Rc3 30. Rd8 Rc8 31.
Rxf8+ Rxf8 32. gxh5 Bxh5 33. e6 1-0

[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.26"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Bareev, Evgeny"]
[Black "Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E15"]
[WhiteElo "2666"]
[BlackElo "2711"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "144"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

{With an average rating of 2690, this is almost certainly the highest-rated
board 4 game Canada will play at any Olympiad.  A long theoretical line in the
Closed Catalan leads to a balanced position where Black has an extra pawn but
White has the center. Vidit plays ambitiously, and is forced to give a N for
two more pawns, and later offers an exchange sac to repair his doubled c-pawns.
Bareev reaches a position which is probably won, but misses key chances to
activate his Rs and the game ends in a repetition.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4
e6 4. g3 Bb4+ 5. Bd2 Be7 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. Qc2 Nbd7 9. Bf4 b6 10. Rd1 Ba6
{[#]} 11. b3 (11. Ne5 Rc8 12. Nc3 Bxc4 13. Nxc4 dxc4 14. e4 b5 15. a4 a6 16. d5
$5 cxd5 17. exd5 e5 18. Bg5 b4 19. d6 bxc3 20. Qxc3 $13 {1/2-1/2 (44) So,W 
(2773)-Karjakin,S (2769) Wijk aan Zee 2016}) 11... Rc8 12. Nc3 h6 (12... Nh5
13. Bc1 Nhf6 14. e4 dxc4 15. Bf4 Bb4 {1/2-1/2 (63) Kovalyov,A (2622)-Nakamura,
H (2787) Tromsoe 2014}) 13. e4 dxc4 14. Nd2 b5 (14... cxb3 $2 15. axb3 $16 {
skewers the a7 pawn.}) 15. bxc4 bxc4 16. Na4 g5 (16... c5 17. d5 exd5 18. exd5
Nh5 19. Be3 Bf6 20. Rab1 Bd4 21. Nxc4 Bxc4 22. Qxc4 Bxe3 23. fxe3 {0-1 (44)
Nielsen,P (2620)-Sasikiran,K (2670) Hastings 2003}) 17. Be3 Ng4 18. Nf1 (18.
Nxc4 Bxc4 (18... c5 $5) 19. Qxc4 Nxe3 20. fxe3 Qa5 21. Rab1 c5 $11 {0-1 (36)
Neelotpal,D (2428)-Castellanos Rodriguez,R (2474) Lille 2014}) 18... Qc7 19.
Bd2 c5 20. d5 Nde5 {Threatening ...Nd3} 21. h3 $1 {[#]Black has a choice of
two ways to give up a N for PP.} Nf6 $2 (21... Nxf2 $1 22. Kxf2 exd5 23. exd5
Nd3+ 24. Kg1 Bf6 25. Bc3 Bd4+ {with comp. White's K is more exposed here than
in the game line.}) 22. Bc3 Nd3 23. d6 $1 Qxd6 24. e5 Qd8 25. exf6 Bxf6 26.
Bxf6 Qxf6 $16 {Black has given up a N for three pawns and the d3-octopus, but
his c-pawns are immobile and his B is not much good.} 27. Rab1 Rfd8 28. a3 {
Possibly trying to stop Nb4-d5?} (28. Ne3 $1 Nb4 29. Rxd8+ Rxd8 30. Qc3 $18)
28... Rd4 {[#]} 29. Nh2 (29. Nc3 Rcd8 30. Rd2 R4d7 31. Ne3 $1 {looks like a
blunder, but...} Nb4 $2 {(or ...Ne1) ...fails to a nice tactical sequence:} (
31... Kf8 32. Bc6) 32. Rxd7 Nxc2 33. Ne4 $1 $18 {Black's Q is overloaded and
White ends up with way too many pieces.}) 29... Rcd8 30. Nf3 $6 (30. Nc3 Qg7
31. Nf1 f5 32. Nb5 $16) 30... R4d7 31. Nh2 h5 32. Rf1 Qg7 33. Qc3 Qxc3 34. Nxc3
f5 35. Rfd1 {[#]} Kg7 (35... h4 $5 {Threatening hxg3 -- which would at least
give Black a passed e-pawn -- is a deep pawn sac to open files on the kingside;
e.g.} 36. gxh4 gxh4 37. Nf3 Kg7 38. Nxh4 Kf6 $13 {with counterplay on the
g-file and N hops to f4.}) 36. Nf1 Kf6 37. Rd2 g4 38. h4 Rd6 39. Ne3 Rb6 40.
Rxb6 axb6 41. a4 Rd4 42. Nc2 Rd6 43. Na3 Rd4 44. Nc2 Rd6 45. Kf1 e5 46. Rd1 Ke6
47. Ke2 e4 48. Ke3 Ke5 49. Bf1 Bc8 50. Ne2 {[#] Black's extra pawns are well
blockaded, but what is White suppsed to do with his tangled pieces? With such
an unusual position, and well into the second time control, it is not
surprising that both sides make mistakes.} Bd7 $6 51. Na3 $1 Rd4 $5 52. Nxd4 $2
(52. Rb1 $1 {activates the R by trading a4 for b6.}) 52... cxd4+ 53. Ke2 (53.
Kd2 $4 c3+ $19) 53... Kd5 $2 (53... Nb2 54. Rb1 d3+ 55. Ke3 c3 56. Rxb2 {Only move.} cxb2
57. Nc4+ Kd5 58. Nxb2 Kc5 $11) 54. Nxc4 $1 Kxc4 55. Kd2 Bxa4 {[#]} 56. Bxd3+ $2
$11 {White misses his last chance.} ({An in-form Bareev would certainly have
found the win here with:} 56. Rc1+ {Only move.} {puts the R on an open file and pushes
the black K further away from supporting his queenside pawns.} Kd5 57. Bxd3
exd3 58. Rc8 $1 (58. Kxd3 $2 Bc6) 58... Ke4 (58... b5 59. Rh8 b4 60. Rxh5 b3
61. Rh8 $18) 59. Rh8 Kf3 60. Rxh5 Kxf2 61. Rxf5+ Kxg3 62. h5 $18) 56... exd3
57. Re1 b5 58. Re8 b4 59. Rc8+ Kd5 (59... Kb3 $11) 60. Rb8 b3 61. Kxd3 {Only move.} {
Otherwise ...Kc4 and either ...Bb5 or ...K walks to a3.} Kc5 62. Kd2 Kc4 63.
Rb7 Bb5 64. Rb8 d3 65. Kc1 $1 Bc6 66. Kd2 Be4 67. Kc1 Kc3 68. Rc8+ {Only move.} Kd4 69.
Kd2 Bd5 70. Re8 Kc4 71. Rb8 Kd4 72. Re8 Kc4 1/2-1/2

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.26"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Zatonsikh, Anna"]
[Black "Matras-Clement, Agnieszka"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D10"]
[WhiteElo "2431"]
[BlackElo "2225"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "94"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. cxd5 cxd5 4. Bf4 Nc6 5. e3 Nf6 6. Nc3 a6 7. Bd3 e6 8. Rc1
Bd6 9. Bxd6 Qxd6 10. f4 $14 {White has a Stonewall with the favourable B trade.
This is the kind of position we'd see Capablanca win in a totally one-sided
game. The embedded games show modern Black players sac'ing a pawn for activity.
} O-O 11. Nf3 b5 $5 (11... Bd7 12. Ne5 {White scores 64% but only +10 Elo from
here.} Rfc8 13. O-O Be8 14. g4 $5 Nd7 15. g5 Ne7 16. Qf3 b5 17. a3 Rc7 18. Ne4
$2 {A clever try, but only good enough for equality.} dxe4 19. Qxe4 {Forking
a8 and h7.} Rxc1 20. Rxc1 Qd5 {Only move.} 21. Qxh7+ Kf8 22. Be4 (22. Qh8+ Ng8 23. Bh7
Nxe5 24. fxe5 Bc6 25. Rxc6 Qxc6 26. Qxg8+ Ke7 27. Qxg7 {should end in a
pepetual.}) 22... Qb3 23. Qh8+ Ng8 24. Rc3 Qd1+ 25. Kf2 Qd2+ 26. Kg3 $4 (26.
Kf3 {Only move.} Nxe5+ 27. fxe5 Qd1+ $11) 26... Qe1+ 27. Kg2 b4 $3 {An excellent
line-opening sac by Black.} 28. axb4 Nxe5 29. fxe5 Rb8 30. Bh7 Ke7 31. Qxg7
Rxb4 32. Rc2 Qxe3 33. Qxg8 Rxd4 34. Rf2 Rg4+ 35. Kf1 Bb5+ {0-1 (35) Volkov,S 
(2627)-Cori Tello,J (2636) Sitges 2017}) 12. O-O Bb7 13. Ne5 Rac8 14. Qe2 {
The Q usually goes to f3 to discourage ...Ne4.} (14. a3 Ne7 15. Qf3 Rc7 16. g4
Rfc8 17. Rcd1 b4 18. axb4 Qxb4 19. Rf2 Ne4 $5 {White plays nervously, but
Black shouldn't get enough for the pawn.} 20. Nxe4 dxe4 21. Bxe4 Bxe4 22. Qxe4
Rc1 23. Rdf1 (23. Rxc1 $1 {Stockfish} Rxc1+ 24. Kg2 Qe1 25. Nf3 $16) 23...
Rxf1+ 24. Rxf1 (24. Kxf1 $1) 24... Qxb2 25. f5 exf5 26. gxf5 Qb6 27. Ng4 h5 {Only move.}
(27... Qd6 28. f6 $18) 28. f6 Ng6 $4 29. Qf5 $1 $18 Qb7 30. Qxh5 Rc2 31. d5 {Only move.}
$18 gxf6 32. Qh6 {1-0 (32) Naiditsch,A (2712)-Movsesian,S (2705) Sibenik 2012})
14... Ne7 $1 {The N retreat lets the Bb7 fight for e4 and the Q defend a6.} 15.
Bb1 Ne4 16. Nd3 f5 17. a4 $6 bxa4 $1 $11 (17... b4 18. Nxe4 dxe4 19. Nc5 $14)
18. Nxa4 Bc6 19. Ndc5 Bxa4 $11 20. Bxe4 dxe4 21. Nxa4 Rxc1 22. Rxc1 Rb8 23. Nc5
Rb6 24. Rc4 h6 25. Qd2 Nd5 26. b3 a5 27. h3 Rb4 28. Rc1 Kh7 29. Ra1 Qb6 30. Kh2
Nf6 31. Qe2 Kg8 32. Qa2 Rb5 33. Qc2 Nd5 34. Re1 Qd6 35. Qe2 Rb4 36. Kh1 Kh7 37.
Qh5 Qe7 38. Qe2 Qd6 39. Ra1 Qb6 40. Qd2 Kg8 41. Re1 Qb5 42. Qd1 Nf6 43. Qc2 Qc6
44. Qd2 Nd5 45. Rc1 Qb5 46. Re1 Kh7 47. Qd1 Nf6 1/2-1/2

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.26"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Zhou, Qiyu"]
[Black "Krush, Irina"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B43"]
[WhiteElo "2207"]
[BlackElo "2423"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "76"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

{GM Irina Krush is the 7-time US Champion, and her experience shows in the opening, where she chooses an excellent line/move order vs Qiyu, whose attempt to go into an English Attack (?) allows an early ...d5 and a middle game where White has no active play. Qiyu uses a lot of time early, and blunders late.} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. Nc3 Qc7 $1 6. Be3 $6 Bb4 $1 {
delaying ...Nc6 means Black now threatens to win a pawn with Xc3.} 7. Qd2 (7.
Qd3 $5 {1/2-1/2 (20) Vovk,A (2644)-Werle,J (2514) Fagernes 2015}) (7. Nb3 Nf6
8. a3 $6 Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 d6 (9... Qxc3+ $15) 10. Bd3 Qxc3+ 11. Nd2 O-O 12. O-O
$15 {0-1 (35) Abrahamyan,T (2239)-Krush,I (2479) Tulsa US Ch, 2008}) (7. Nde2
Nf6 8. a3 Be7 {1/2-1/2 (27) Gamundi Salamanca,A (2443)-Delchev,A (2638) Jaen
2014}) 7... Nf6 8. Bd3 (8. f3 d5 $15) 8... d5 $1 {"This timely blow ensures
equality, or even a slight advantage." - Johan Hellsten, Play the Sicilian Kan
(Everyman, 2010)} 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nde2 Nxe3 $1 11. Qxe3 Nc6 $17 {[#] It's
hard to be sure what evauation symbol to put here. Optically, White's position
isn't so bad -- she has development for the B-pair, and engines rate it as
close to equal -- but there's no clear way to improve White's position, while
Black's play is obvious: extra center pawn, B pair, queenside minority attack.
In part that may explain White's time use for her next six moves.} 12. O-O {
White spend 12 min on this.} (12. O-O-O $5 {would leave White free to push her
K side pawns.}) 12... O-O 13. Rad1 {3 min on this} (13. Na4 Bd7 14. Nb6 Rad8
15. Nxd7 Rxd7 16. Qe4 g6 17. c3 Be7 $15 {0-1 (57) Moshina,C (2185)-Hegedus,I 
(2325) Deva 1998} (17... Rfd8 $1 $15)) 13... b6 14. Na4 {12 min on this} (14.
Ne4 Be7 15. Ng5 h6 16. Nf3 $14 {might improve the Nc3 while preparing for
Black's c-file pressure.}) 14... Rb8 15. Be4 {14 min on this} Be7 16. Qc3 {
12 min on this} Bb7 {[#]} 17. Qe3 $6 {... and 15 min on this. That's 68
minutes on seven indifferent moves. Even equality would be hard to hold with
that much of a time disadvantage against the multi-time US Women's Champion
and GM.} (17. Nd4 $1 {looks strategically right, trying to force off the the B
pair.} Bb4 (17... Bf6 18. Bxc6) 18. Qh3 $15) 17... Nb4 18. Nac3 Rfd8 19. a3
Bxe4 20. Qxe4 Nc6 21. h3 g6 22. Nf4 Bf6 23. Nfe2 Na5 24. Rxd8+ Rxd8 25. Rd1 {
[#]} Rc8 $1 {The c-file is where the action is.} 26. Nd4 (26. Qe3 b5 27. Qc1
Nc4 28. Rd3 Kg7 $17) (26. h4 {is too slow} Nc4 27. h5 Nxb2 $19) 26... Be5 (
26... Bg7 27. Rd3 Nc4 28. Nd1 b5 $17) 27. Nce2 Nc4 28. b3 Nxa3 29. Ra1 Nb5 30.
Rxa6 $4 {A bunder in time pressure: White's weak back rank will cost her the
game.} Nxd4 31. Nxd4 Rd8 {Only move.} $19 32. Ra4 (32. Nf3 Rd1+ 33. Ne1 Bc3 $19) 32... b5
33. Rb4 Qc5 $1 34. c3 Qxc3 35. Qxe5 Qxb4 36. Nc6 (36. Nxe6 {is nothing} fxe6 (
36... Rd1+ 37. Kh2 Qd6 $19) 37. Qxe6+ Kg7 $19) 36... Rd1+ 37. Kh2 Qd6 38. Qxd6
Rxd6 0-1

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.26"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Foisor, Sabina-Francesca"]
[Black "Ouellet, Maili-Jade"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "D31"]
[WhiteElo "2311"]
[BlackElo "2144"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "142"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Be7 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bf4 c6 6. Qc2 g6 7. e3 Bf5 8. Qd2
Nf6 9. f3 h5 {The main move in this position. It looks loose, but keeps the
Bf5 in place(for now), and can be useful later to nudge a piece off g3.} 10.
Bd3 Bxd3 11. Qxd3 Nbd7 12. Nge2 {"The statistics of these variations are
depressing for Black..." - Kasparov.} b5 $5 (12... Nf8 13. O-O-O (13. e4 $5)
13... Ne6 14. Be5 O-O 15. h4 Nd7 16. g4 Nxe5 17. dxe5 hxg4 18. h5 gxf3 19. hxg6
fxe2 20. Rdg1 e1=Q+ 21. Rxe1 Bh4 22. Ref1 f5 23. Rxf5 Kg7 $4 24. Rh5 $18 Rh8
25. R1xh4 Qxh4 26. Rxh4 Rxh4 27. Qf5 Rh1+ 28. Nd1 Rf8 29. Qxe6 Rff1 30. Kc2 {
1-0 (30) Mastrovasilis,A (2517)-Rychagov,A (2552) Kavala 2015}) 13. O-O O-O 14.
Rad1 (14. a3 a5 15. e4 $1 dxe4 16. fxe4 Nc5 17. Qf3 Ne6 18. Rad1 $14 {1-0 (41)
Yu,Y (2759)-Xu,Y (2536) Hangzhou 2018}) 14... b4 15. Nb1 $6 (15. Na4 {is
better, but doesn't stop ...c5, which is always Black's way to get play after
f2-f3.}) 15... c5 $1 $11 16. b3 Qb6 17. Nd2 Rfe8 18. Bg3 (18. Rfe1 cxd4 (18...
a5 $5) (18... Rac8) 19. exd4 Bd6 20. Bxd6 Qxd6 $11) 18... Rac8 19. Bf2 cxd4 $15
(19... c4 $1 20. bxc4 Qa6 $1 21. Rc1 Nb6 $17) 20. exd4 Nf8 21. Kh1 Bd6 22. Bh4
Bb8 23. Rc1 N8h7 24. Bg3 Bxg3 25. hxg3 Ng5 26. Nf4 Ne6 27. Nxe6 (27. Nxg6 $2
fxg6 28. Qxg6+ Ng7 $19) 27... Qxe6 {how can White defend g3?} 28. Qb5 $2 (28.
Kg1 Qd6 29. Rxc8 Rxc8 30. Rd1 (30. Kf2 h4 31. gxh4 Nh5 $19) 30... Rc3 31. Qe2
Qxg3 $17) 28... Qd6 29. f4 (29. Kh2 h4 $19) 29... Rxc1 30. Rxc1 h4 $1 31. Nf3
Re4 $4 (31... hxg3 $1 $19 {this pawn now creates both back rank and h-file
threats.} 32. Ne5 Qe6 33. Qb7 (33. Rc6 Qf5 $19) 33... Ne4 34. Qc6 Qe7 {heading
to h4} 35. Kg1 Nc3 $19) 32. Qc5 (32. gxh4 Qxf4 33. Rc8+ Kg7 34. Qxb4 $11) 32...
Qxc5 33. dxc5 hxg3 34. c6 Re8 {Only move.} 35. Nd4 Rc8 36. Kg1 Kf8 $15 37. Rc5 Ke7 38.
Ra5 Rc7 39. Rb5 (39. Ra6 Nh5 40. Nb5 Rc8 41. Nxa7 Rc7 42. Nb5 Rc8) 39... Kd6
40. Rxb4 $6 (40. Kf1 $142 $17) 40... Kc5 $6 {This will force off White's c6
pawn, leaving a two-result game, so it's a practical choice, especially at the
time control; but it's not objectively best.} (40... Re7 $142 $19 {keeps the
pieces on so mate threats will force White back.} 41. Nf3 (41. Kf1 Ng4 $1 $19)
41... Re2 $18 (41... Kxc6 $19)) 41. Rb7 $1 Ne8 {Only move.} $17 (41... Kd6 $4 42. Nb5+
$18) (41... Rc8 $2 42. Ne2 $13) 42. Ne2 Kxc6 43. Rxc7+ $6 {There may be more
chances for errors with the Rs on.} Nxc7 44. Nxg3 {[#] Black is a passed pawn
up in a N ending with a more active K. Black has a lot of opportunities to
throw away the win through carelessness, but she accurately enough the rest of
the way.} Kc5 45. Ne2 Kb4 46. Kf2 Ka3 47. Nd4 Kxa2 48. b4 Ne6 49. Nc6 a6 50.
Ke3 Kb3 51. g4 Kc3 $1 {Supporting the d-passer.} 52. Ne5 d4+ 53. Ke4 f6 54. Nd3
(54. Nxg6 d3 {Only move.} 55. Ne7 d2 56. Nd5+ Kc2 57. Ne3+ Kc1 $19 58. Kf5 (58. g5 fxg5
59. f5 Nf8 $19) 58... Nd4+ 59. Kxf6 Nc2 $1 $19) 54... Ng7 55. f5 gxf5+ 56. gxf5
Nxf5 $1 57. Nc5 Nd6+ 58. Kd5 Nb5 59. Nxa6 f5 {Only move.} (59... d3 $2 60. Nc5 d2 61.
Ne4+ Kd3 62. Nxd2 Kxd2 63. Ke6 $11) 60. Nc5 Kxb4 {Only move.} 61. Nd3+ Kc3 {Only move.} 62. Nf2 d3
{Only move.} 63. Ke5 d2 {Only move.} 64. Kxf5 Kc2 65. Ke5 Nc3 66. Kd4 Ne2+ (66... Nd1 $2 67. Ne4
$11) 67. Kc4 Nf4 $1 68. Kb5 Nh3 $1 69. Ng4 Kd3 $1 70. Ne5+ Ke4 71. Nc4 d1=Q 0-1

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.26"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Agbabishvili, Lali"]
[Black "Yu, Jennifer"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "D02"]
[WhiteElo "2128"]
[BlackElo "2268"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "170"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

{Black equalizes in a not-very theoretical London System. White has a nominally better LSB, but (as Kramnik asked about the the LSBs in the Stonewall -- why IS White's B better than Black's when it has so little to do? The game goes into a Rook ending where Black has the initiative, and when White doesn't find a way to activate her Rook -- going into a drawn PPP vs R ending -- Black converts to win the match.}1. d4 d5 2. Bf4 Nf6 3. e3 e6 4. Nf3 Bd6 5. Ne5 (5. Bg3 {is more common; one
shocking example being} O-O 6. Nbd2 c5 7. c3 Nc6 8. Bd3 Qe7 9. Ne5 Nd7 10. Nxd7
$1 Bxd7 $2 11. Bxd6 $1 Qxd6 12. dxc5 $1 Qxc5 13. Bxh7+ $3 Kxh7 14. Qh5+ Kg8 15.
Ne4 $18 {and White had a winning attack in Kamsky,G (2709)-Shankland,S (2611)
Sturbridge 2014 (1-0, 31)}) 5... O-O 6. Bd3 c5 7. c3 Nc6 8. Nd2 Qc7 9. Ndf3 {
[#]} b6 (9... Nd7 $2 10. Ng5 $1) 10. Nxc6 (10. h4 $5 {(followed by g4 if Black
closes the queenside with ...c4) is recommended in "The Agile London System"
by Holmes and de Prado (New in Chess, 2016).}) 10... Qxc6 11. Bxd6 (11. Ne5 Qc7
12. Qf3 Ne4 13. Nc4 $6 (13. Bxe4 $2 dxe4 14. Qxe4 Bb7 15. Qd3 cxd4 16. cxd4 (
16. exd4 $4 f6 $19) 16... a5 $1 $17 {aiming for ...Ba6.} (16... Bxg2 $15 {
is obviously riskier.})) 13... Bxf4 14. Qxf4 Qxf4 15. exf4 Ba6 $15 {1/2-1/2 
(95) Giri,A (2798)-Hou,Y (2673) Wijk aan Zee 2016}) 11... Qxd6 12. Ne5 Bb7 13.
O-O Ne4 14. f3 f6 {[#]} 15. Ng4 Ng5 16. f4 (16. h4 Nf7 17. f4) 16... Ne4 17.
Qe2 Qe7 18. Rad1 Rad8 19. Rf3 Bc6 20. Qc2 Be8 21. Rh3 (21. Bxe4 $2 dxe4 22.
Qxe4 $4 f5 $19) 21... Bg6 22. Nf2 Nxf2 23. Kxf2 f5 24. Be2 Rc8 25. Qd2 (25. b3
$5) 25... Rc7 26. Kg1 c4 $1 $15 {[#] Black wouldn't take on d4 when exd4 would
leave the e6-pawn on a half-open file, so Black loses no real flexibility in
pushing to c4. Conventionally, this push makes Black's LSB even worse than it
was, but Black's Rs are more mobile than White's (esp the Rh3) and so can
benefit more from the chance to open the a or b-file.} 27. Rf1 b5 28. a3 a5 29.
g4 (29. Rhf3) 29... fxg4 (29... b4 $1 30. axb4 (30. gxf5 $2 Bxf5 $19 {
White is hanging on h3 and a3.}) 30... axb4 31. cxb4 Rb7 $19) 30. Bxg4 Rf6 $6 (
30... Bf5 31. Qd1 (31. Rg3 Rb7)) 31. Rg3 Rb7 32. Qg2 Bd3 33. Be2 Bf5 34. Bf3
Bd3 35. Be2 Bxe2 36. Qxe2 Qd6 (36... b4 37. axb4 axb4 38. e4 $132) 37. Qg2 (37.
e4 $1 Rxf4 (37... dxe4 38. Qxe4 Rbf7 39. Rg5 Rxf4 40. Rxf4 Rxf4 41. Qe5 $1 $11
(41. Qa8+ Rf8 42. Qxa5 $4 Qf4 $19)) 38. Rxf4 Qxf4 39. exd5 $11) 37... Rbf7 38.
Kh1 Kf8 39. Rg1 Qd7 40. Qh3 Rh6 41. Qg4 Qe7 42. Rh3 Qf6 43. Rxh6 Qxh6 44. Rg3
Qf6 45. h3 Qf5 46. Kh2 Ke8 (46... Qc2+ 47. Rg2 Qe4 48. Qg5 g6 49. Qe5 Qxe5 50.
dxe5 b4 $15) 47. Qe2 h6 48. Qg2 Kf8 49. Qe2 Rb7 50. Qd2 g6 51. Rg2 Kf7 52. Re2
Qe4 53. Rg2 Kg7 54. Re2 Rf7 55. Rg2 Kh7 56. Qc2 Qxc2 57. Rxc2 g5 (57... b4 58.
axb4 axb4 $15) 58. fxg5 hxg5 59. Kg2 Kg6 60. Re2 e5 61. dxe5 Re7 62. Kf3 Rxe5
63. e4 Kh5 64. exd5 Rxd5 65. Ke4 Rd3 {[#]White can bail out to P vs R endings
if she activates her R now.} 66. Rh2 $2 (66. Rf2 Rxh3 (66... Kh4 67. Rf5 Rg3
68. Rxb5 Kxh3 69. Rxa5 $11) 67. Rf5 Rh1 (67... Rh4+) (67... Kh4 68. Rxb5 g4 69.
Rxa5 Rd3 70. Rc5 g3 71. Rxc4) 68. Rxb5 Kh4 69. Rxa5 g4 {[#]} 70. Ra8 (70. Kd4
g3 71. Ra8 g2 72. Rh8+ (72. Rg8 g1=Q+ 73. Rxg1 Rxg1 74. Kxc4 Kg5 $19) 72... Kg3
73. Rg8+ Kf2 74. Kxc4 g1=Q 75. Rxg1 Rxg1 76. b4 $11) 70... Re1+ 71. Kd5 g3 72.
Rg8 Kh3 73. Rh8+ Kg4 74. Rg8+ Kf3 75. Rf8+ Ke2 76. Rg8 Kf2 77. Rf8+ Kg1 78.
Kxc4 g2 79. Rg8 Kf2 (79... Kf1 80. b4 g1=Q $4 81. Rxg1+ Kxg1 82. a4 $18) 80. b4
(80. Rxg2+ Kxg2) 80... g1=Q 81. Rxg1 Rxg1 {Only move.} $11) 66... Kh4 $19 67. Kf5 Rf3+
68. Kg6 Rg3 {Only move.} 69. Kf5 (69. Rh1 Rg2 $1) 69... Rg1 (69... a4 70. Kg6 (70. Rh1
Rg2 $19) 70... Rg1 {Only move.} 71. Kf5 Kg3 $19) 70. Ke4 Kg3 71. Re2 (71. Rd2 $142 Kxh3
72. Rd5 g4 73. Rh5+ Kg2 74. Rxb5 $17) 71... Kxh3 72. Kd4 Rf1 (72... g4 $1) 73.
Re5 g4 74. Rxb5 (74. Rh5+ Kg2 75. Rxb5 g3 76. Rxa5 Rf4+ $1 77. Ke3 Rg4 $19)
74... g3 {[#]} 75. Rb8 (75. Rxa5 g2 76. Rg5 (76. Rh5+ Kg4 {Only move.} 77. Rh8 g1=Q+ {
and there's no skewer because the promotion comes with check.}) 76... Rf4+ $1
77. Ke3 Rf5 $1 78. Rg8 Kh2 $19 79. Kd4 Rf4+ 80. Ke3 (80. Ke5 Rh4 $19) 80... Rf8
$1 $19) 75... g2 76. Rh8+ Kg3 77. Rg8+ Kf3 78. Kxc4 g1=Q 79. Rxg1 Rxg1 80. b4
axb4 81. axb4 {[#] White to move would be a draw, but Black to move wins} Ke4
$19 82. b5 Ke5 83. Kc5 Ke6 84. Kc6 (84. c4 Kd7 $19) 84... Rc1 85. b6 Rxc3+ 0-1
merida
46
Author: John Upper
Posted: September 30, 2018, 12:36 am

The 43rd Chess Olympiad is currently running in Batumi, Georgia, from September 23 - October 7, 2018.

Canada has sent two teams:

  • Canadian Men/Open (ranked #28 of 185)
  • Canadian Women (ranked #40 of 150) 

Results so far...

Rd. 1

  • Men defeated #118 Nepal +3 =0 -1 -- Hambleton upset loss
  • Women defeated #114 Uganda: +3 =1 -0

Rd.2 (annotated games below)

  • Men defeated #61 Venezeuala: +1 =3 -0  -- Noritsyn win
  • Women defeated #46 Moldova:  +2 =2 -0

Rd.3

  • Men lost to #5 India: +0 =1 -3  -- Hansen lost to Anand, Bareev with the draw.
  • Women lost to #10 USA: +1 =1 -2 -- MJ defeated 2017 US Champ Sabina Foisor with Black

Rd.4

  • Men play #58 Columbia
  • Women play #92 Syria


Links

see: http://chess.ca/newsfeed/node/1081


..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Hansen, Eric"]
[Black "Iturrizaga Bonelli, Eduardo"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B42"]
[WhiteElo "2629"]
[BlackElo "2636"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "45"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. Bd3 Nf6 6. O-O Qc7 7. c4 d6 8. Nc3
Nbd7 9. f4 Be7 10. Kh1 b6 11. Qe2 O-O 12. Bd2 Bb7 (12... Re8 13. Rac1 Bb7 14.
b4 Bf8 15. Nb3 Rab8 16. Be3 g6 17. Bd4 Qd8 18. e5 Nh5 $1 (18... dxe5 $2 19.
fxe5 Nh5 20. Be4 (20. a3 Bh6 $1 $15) 20... Bxb4 21. Bxb7 Rxb7 22. Ne4 $16) 19.
Qf2 Qc7 20. Rce1 Bg7 21. Be2 dxe5 22. fxe5 Nxe5 23. c5 $1 $13 {Lagarde,M (2604)
-Shchekachev,A (2540) Brest 2018 (0-1 , 42)}) 13. Rae1 Rad8 (13... Rfd8 14. b4
Rac8 15. a3 Bf8 16. Rc1 g6 17. f5 $1 Re8 (17... e5 $2 18. Nd5 $18 {followed by
cxd5 and Nc6.}) 18. fxe6 fxe6 19. e5 $5 (19. Bb1 $1 Qxc4 $2 20. Qf2 $1 $18 {
and now Ba2 is another attacking vector.}) 19... dxe5 20. Nf3 Nh5 21. g3 $2
Ndf6 22. Kg1 Rcd8 23. Bb1 $2 e4 $19 24. Nxe4 Nxe4 25. Bxe4 Nxg3 $1 26. hxg3
Qxg3+ 27. Qg2 (27. Kh1 {doesn't save the Be4} Qh3+ 28. Kg1 (28. Nh2 Rxd2 $19)
28... Qg4+ $19) 27... Qxg2+ 28. Kxg2 Bxe4 $19 {0-1 (34) Sethuraman,S (2576)-Yu,
Y (2667) Sharjah 2014}) 14. b4 Rfe8 15. a3 Bf8 16. Nf3 g6 17. Qf2 Bg7 18. Qh4
Nh5 (18... d5 19. cxd5 Nf8 (19... e5) (19... exd5 20. e5 Ne4 21. Nxe4 dxe4 22.
Bxe4 $16) 20. Rc1 $16 {1-0 (34) Mas,H (2425)-Cheng,B (2103) Canberra 2009}) ({
Stockfish says:} 18... Rc8 19. Qh3 Nh5 20. Ng5 Re7 $14) 19. Ne2 Ndf6 {[#]
Critical position: g4 or not g4?} 20. Nc3 (20. g4 {wins a N for two pawns, but
Black gets comp on the long diagonal, and Black has a choice of how to play.
Computers prefer White on either continuation, but if you play this sort of
opening as White, you probably prefer to have the initiative, rather than
defending extra material.}) (20. g4 Nxe4 21. Bxe4 {only move.} Bxe4 22. gxh5 Qxc4 23. Qf2
$14 {threatening ...Qd5}) (20. g4 Nxg4 21. Qxg4 Nf6 22. Qg1 $1 {defending and
hitting b6.} (22. Qh3 $5) (22. Qh4 $5) 22... Nxe4 (22... Bxe4 $6 23. Bxe4 Nxe4
24. Rc1 {does not look like long term comp.}) 23. Be3 $1 {White hopes for h3
then Kh2.} (23. Bxe4 Bxe4 24. Qe3 Bb7 $44 (24... Qxc4 $13)) 23... Qc6 (23...
Rd7 $5 24. h3 e5 25. Bxb6 Qc6 26. Kh2 $16) (23... d5 {would be thematic, but
here it blocks the long diagonal.}) (23... Nf6) 24. h3 $14 (24. Bxb6 $4 Nd2 $19
)) 20... Nd7 21. Ne2 Ndf6 22. Nc3 Nd7 23. Ne2 {"Way to defend the White pieces
Eric" was the teasing comment from Yasser Seirawan and Robin Van Kampen when
they saw the end of this game.} 1/2-1/2

[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Ynojosa Aponte, Felix Jose"]
[Black "Noritsyn, Nikolay"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A21"]
[WhiteElo "2370"]
[BlackElo "2482"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "92"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

{A really nice game by Nikolay, and another where he shows exceptional scoring
ability with Black. An unusual Nimzo-English, where Black concedes the B pair
to mangle White's pawns, a middle game where Black's Q looks trapped, followed
by an endgame where Black convincingly shows that there are some positions
with pawns on both sides where a N is (much) better than a B.} 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3
Bb4 3. e4 $5 {[#] Rare, and not particularly well-scoring, but Black does well
after any of the main moves.} (3. Qc2 {and}) (3. g3 {and}) (3. Nd5 {are far
more common.}) 3... Nc6 (3... Nf6 4. Bd3 $5 {A standard development in lines
with ...b6 and ...Bb7, but "creative" here.} O-O 5. Nge2 Bc5 6. O-O a6 7. Bc2
Nc6 8. h3 b5 (8... d6 {looks perfectly OK.}) 9. d3 bxc4 10. dxc4 h6 11. Rb1 Rb8
12. a3 a5 13. Bd2 d6 14. Nd5 Bd7 (14... Nd4 $5 15. Nxd4 Bxd4 16. Bxa5 Nxd5 17.
cxd5 Rxb2 {White might have an edge.}) 15. Bc3 Ra8 $2 16. Kh1 Nh7 17. b4 $16 {
1-0 (31) Jobava,B (2699)-Zvjaginsev,V (2658) Sochi 2015}) 4. Nf3 d6 5. d4 exd4
6. Nxd4 Nf6 (6... Qh4 $5 {poses interesting problems, which Stockfish solves
with} 7. Be2 Qxe4 8. Ndb5 Qe7 9. O-O Bxc3 10. Nxc3 Nf6 {and White has comp
after Bg5 or Nd5 or Re1.}) 7. Nxc6 bxc6 8. Bd3 Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 Nd7 10. Be3 (10.
Qg4 $2 Qf6 $1) 10... c5 11. f4 $6 {The right idea -- pushing the pawn majority
with the chance of opening the center for the Bs with d5 -- but incautious.
Better was 00 and then f4.} Qh4+ $1 12. g3 Qh3 13. Qc2 O-O 14. O-O-O {[#]} Nf6
({Stockfish immediately rates} 14... Rb8 $1 {as winning (+1.8), but it's not
clear why. The reason seems to be that, in addition to putting the R on an
open file and restricting the white K, it also gets out of long diagonal
tactics based on Be4.} {Here is one amusing possiblity, which shows that
Black's Q in no sitting duck:} 15. e5 (15. f5 f6 $19) 15... Nb6 16. Rhe1 Bg4
17. Rd2 Rfe8 18. Bf1 Qh6 19. f5 Rxe5 $3 20. Bxh6 Rxe1+ 21. Kb2 Nxc4#) 15. Rhe1
(15. e5 $1 Ng4 16. Rhe1 Nxe3 17. Rxe3 Rb8 18. exd6 cxd6 19. Rde1 {Black's K is
safer and the White pawns are a bit worse.}) 15... Bg4 16. Rd2 Rfe8 {It would
be really easy to burn a lot of time here trying to trap Black's Q... because
it's so close, and yet it can't be done for free.} 17. Bf1 Qh6 18. f5 $2 (18.
e5 {only move.} $11 dxe5 19. fxe5 Rxe5 {only move.} 20. Bxh6 Rxe1+ 21. Kb2 Rxf1 $13) 18... Qh5 $19
19. h3 Bf3 20. g4 Qh4 21. Bf2 Qh6 22. Be3 {[#]} Bxe4 $1 (22... g5 $1 $19 {
saves the Q and wins the e4 pawn.}) 23. Bxh6 Bxc2 24. Rxe8+ Rxe8 25. Bxg7 Kxg7
26. Kxc2 {[#]Material is equal but Black has a much better minor piece --
White's B won't be able to attack any of Black's pawns.} Kh6 27. Re2 $2 {
Trading Rs increases Black's advantage as White cannot defend the dark squares.
} Rxe2+ 28. Bxe2 Kg5 29. Kb3 Ne4 30. Bd3 Kf4 31. a3 {[#]} c6 $1 (31... f6 $6 {
is tempting (pawns on opposite colour of opponent's B) but gives White chances:
} 32. Ka4 (32. h4 h6 $1 (32... Nf2 $4 {33.Be2 -3.51} 33. g5 $1 $18) 33. g5 Nxg5
$3 34. hxg5 hxg5 $19) 32... Nxc3+ 33. Ka5 h6 34. Ka6 Nd1 35. Kxa7 {is NOT a
race Black should allow.}) 32. Kc2 (32. Ka4 {this time there's no race at all:}
Nxc3+ 33. Ka5 Ke3 34. Bf1 d5 $19 {shows one point of ...c6.}) 32... h6 33. h4 (
33. Bxe4 Kxe4 {and Black's K collects like one of those instructive Capablanca
endgames.}) 33... Nf6 $1 {Almost all of the remaining moves drive home one
point: this N is better than that B.} 34. g5 hxg5 35. hxg5 Kxg5 36. Bf1 Kxf5
37. Bg2 d5 {No diagonal for you!} 38. Kd3 Ke5 39. Bh3 Kd6 40. Ke3 Nd7 41. Kf4
Ne5 42. cxd5 cxd5 43. Bf1 (43. Kf5 Nc4 44. a4 a5 45. Bg4 Nb2 {and takes a4.
Who knew a N could cover both sides of the board so well?}) 43... c4 44. Kf5
Nd7 45. Bg2 Nc5 46. Kf6 Ne4+ 0-1

[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Bareev, Evgeny"]
[Black "Zavarce, Oscar Enrique"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "A47"]
[WhiteElo "2666"]
[BlackElo "2346"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "46"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

{Black plays an interesting manoeuver against the Colle-Zukertort to get the B
pair, and White goes for an early repetition.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. e3 b6 4.
Bd3 Bb7 5. Nbd2 c5 6. b3 (6. O-O {is better} {would avoid Black's upcoming manoeuver})
6... cxd4 7. exd4 Nd5 $5 8. Bb2 (8. c4 Nf4 9. Bf1 Bb4 $5 (9... d5 $11)) 8...
Bb4 $5 {Can White hold onto the Bs after this?} (8... Nf4 9. Bf1 Be7 10. g3 Nh5
11. Bd3 Nf6 12. Qe2 d6 13. O-O O-O {with a hedgehoggy position where White has
more space but Black has no weaknesses; ½-½ (40) Rakhmanov,A (2579)
-Shaposhnikov,E (2533) Voronezh 2011}) 9. c4 (9. Be4 f5 {looks like it
equalizes for Black.}) 9... Nf4 10. Bf1 Qf6 11. a3 Bxd2+ 12. Qxd2 Nxg2+ (12...
Bxf3 $1 13. gxf3 O-O 14. Rg1 d5 $15 {1/2-1/2 (31) Zarkova,G-Vasilev,V (2285)
ICCF email 2011} 15. Bc1) 13. Bxg2 Bxf3 14. d5 e5 15. Bxf3 Qxf3 16. Rg1 $11 d6
17. Rxg7 Nd7 18. Rg3 Qh1+ 19. Ke2 Qe4+ 20. Qe3 Qc2+ 21. Qd2 Qe4+ 22. Qe3 Qc2+
23. Qd2 Qe4+ 1/2-1/2

[Event "Olympiad"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Vivas Zamora, Fabian Ernesto"]
[Black "Hambleton, Aman"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B48"]
[WhiteElo "2363"]
[BlackElo "2492"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "118"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be3 a6 7. Qf3 b5 (7...
Nf6 8. O-O-O Ne5 9. Qg3 b5 10. a3 Bb7 11. Bxb5 Rc8 12. Ba4 Nxe4 13. Nxe4 Bxe4
14. Bf4 Qc4 15. Bxe5 Qxa4 16. Rd2 f6 17. Bd6 Kf7 18. Re1 Bg6 {unclear 1-0 (38)
Vachier Lagrave,M (2789)-Anand,V (2776) Karlsruhe/Baden-Baden 2018}) 8. O-O-O (
8. Nxc6 Qxc6 9. Bd3 Nf6 10. e5 Qxf3 11. gxf3 b4 12. exf6 bxc3 13. Bd4 g6 14.
Bxc3 Bb7 15. Ke2 $14 {1-0 (39) Van Kampen,R (2623)-Ingvason,J (2142) Reykjavik
2015}) 8... Bb7 9. Qg3 ({An exciting 2017 game between Canadian juniors
continued:} 9. Nxc6 Bxc6 10. Bd4 Rc8 11. Bd3 Ne7 12. Rhe1 $2 Nf5 $1 $15 13. Be3
(13. Ne2) 13... Nxe3 14. Qxe3 {preparing Nd5} Be7 (14... Qa5 $1 15. Kb1 Bb4 $15
) 15. Nd5 $1 {unclear} Bxd5 16. exd5 O-O 17. Kb1 Bf6 {unclear} 18. Qe4 g6 19.
h4 Qc5 20. dxe6 dxe6 21. Qf4 Bg7 22. g4 Rfd8 23. Qc1 $2 Qxf2 $17 (23... Rd4 $19
) 24. h5 Rd4 25. Rf1 Qg2 26. hxg6 hxg6 27. Rg1 Qf3 28. Qd2 (28. Rdf1 Qd5 $19)
28... Rxg4 29. Rgf1 Qd5 30. Qf2 Qb7 31. c3 Rg2 32. Qf4 Qc7 (32... b4 $1) 33.
Qf3 Rxb2+ $1 34. Ka1 Bxc3 35. Bxg6 Rb4+ 36. Qxc3 Qxc3# {0-1 Shi,D (2261)-Cao,J
(2328) Calgary, 2017.}) 9... Bd6 10. f4 Nxd4 11. Rxd4 Bf8 12. Be2 (12. Rd2 Nf6
(12... b4 $1 $17 {is better}) 13. Bd3 $2 (13. e5 {is better}) 13... Qa5 (13...
b4 $1 {is better}) 14. Kb1 b4 $1 15. Ne2 Nxe4 16. Bxe4 Bxe4 $17 {0-1 (32)
Anton Guijarro,D (2634) -Ivanisevic,I (2653) Berlin 2015}) (12. Bd3 $5 {
Leaving the Rd4 to its fate.} Rc8 13. Kb1 Ne7 14. a4 Nc6 15. axb5 Nxd4 16. Bxd4
axb5 17. Nxb5 Qa5 18. Bc3 Qb6 19. Bd4 Qa5 20. Bc3 (20. f5 $5) 20... Rxc3 $5 {
unclear 0-1 (42) Ter Sahakyan,S (2580)-Ivanisevic,I (2638) Jerusalem 2015})
12... Rc8 13. Rhd1 Nf6 14. Bd3 {Without ...Nc6 coming White isn't committed to
the exchange sac on d4.} b4 15. Na4 d5 16. exd5 Nxd5 17. Rc4 {One of the
points of leaving the R in the center.} Qa5 18. b3 Be7 $4 (18... Nxe3 {is
better} 19. Qxe3 {Black hasn't finished developing, and his queenside looks
loose, but there is a way through the minefield:} Rxc4 $1 (19... Be7 20. Qa7 (
20. Qd4 Rxc4 21. Qxg7 Rxf4 22. Qxh8+ Bf8 {unclear}) 20... Rxc4 {Only move.} 21.
Qxb7 $2 Rd4 $19 {Only move.}) 20. Bxc4 Be7 (20... Qc7 $2 21. f5 $18) 21. Qa7 (
21. Qd4 Qc7 {Only move.} (21... O-O $4 22. Qd7 $18) 22. Qxg7 $4 Qxf4+ 23. Kb1
Bf6 $19) 21... Bc8 22. Nb6 Bc5 $1 23. Qb8 O-O {Only move.} 24. Nxc8 Qxa2 {
Only move. unclear}) 19. Bd4 $1 Bf6 20. Bxf6 gxf6 21. Rxc8+ (21. f5 $1) 21...
Bxc8 22. Be4 Nc3 23. Qg7 $2 ({White should change gears, collecting Black's
loose pawns and aim to win the endgame:} 23. Nxc3 {is better} bxc3 24. Kb1 Ke7
(24... f5 $2 25. Bc6+ $18) 25. Rd3 Bd7 26. Rxc3 $18) 23... Rf8 24. Bc6+ $2 Ke7
25. Rd3 Ne2+ 26. Kb1 Nxf4 27. Rf3 Qc7 (27... Qg5 $1 {is better} 28. Qxh7 (28.
Qxg5 fxg5 $17) 28... Rd8 $19) 28. Qg3 e5 29. Qe1 Qxc6 30. Rxf4 a5 31. Rc4 Qd6
32. Qe3 Rd8 $17 33. Qa7+ Kf8 34. Qxa5 Be6 $19 35. Rh4 (35. Rxb4 Qd1+ $1 (35...
Rc8 $1) 36. Kb2 Rd2 37. Qc5+ Kg7 38. Nb6 Rxg2 {would be a better version of
the game for Black.}) 35... Qd1+ 36. Kb2 {Not a good time to be low on time.}
Rb8 $4 (36... Bf5 {is better} 37. Qxb4+ Kg7 $19) (36... Kg7 {is better}) 37.
Rxb4 $16 Rc8 38. c4 $4 {Yasser and Robin both thought this was suicidal. They
were right -- White is lost -- but not for what looks like the obvious reason..
..} (38. Nc5 Bf5 39. Rc4 $18) 38... Rd8 $2 {Playing for the attack.} (38...
Qd2+ {is better} 39. Ka3 e4 $19 {and despite White's boxed in K, the game is
not decided by an attack, but by the passed e-pawn.} 40. Rb5 Qc1+ $1 41. Kb4 e3
$19) 39. Rb7 Rd2+ 40. Ka3 Qc1+ (40... Rc2 {threatens ... Qc1+ then ...Rxc4+})
41. Kb4 {unclear} Rxa2 $2 (41... Rd4 42. Qa6 Qd2+ 43. Kb5 (43. Ka3 Qc1+ $11)
43... Rxc4 $3 44. bxc4 (44. Qa8+ Rc8 $19) 44... Bxc4+ {and skewer from e2.})
42. Qd8+ $1 Kg7 43. Nc5 $1 Bf5 44. Kb5 Qd2 45. Qe7 Ra5+ 46. Kc6 Rxc5+ $5 {
A good practical choice, especially after the exhausting complications of the
previous 20 moves.} 47. Kxc5 Qa5+ 48. Kd6 Qa6+ 49. Kd5 Be6+ $2 ({The engine's
mainline is:} 49... Qa5+ 50. Kd6 Qa6+ 51. Kc5 Qa5+ 52. Rb5 Qa3+ 53. b4 Qe3+ 54.
Kd6 Qd4+ 55. Kc7 Qxc4+ 56. Qc5 Qe6 {which is still better for White, but it's
not clear if it's enough to win.}) 50. Kc5 {Only move.} Qa5+ 51. Kc6 Qa6+ 52.
Kc7 Qa8 53. Qc5 Qc8+ 54. Kb6 Qd8+ 55. Ka7 (55. Qc7 $1 $16) 55... Qd2 $1 56. Qc6
$2 Qa5+ $1 57. Kb8 (57. Qa6 Qxa6+ {Only move.} 58. Kxa6 Bc8 59. c5 e4 $11 {
would have continued the excitement, but looks like it ends with both sides
promoting and White giving a perpetual on the c8-h3 diagonal.}) 57... Qd8+ $11
58. Ka7 Qa5+ 59. Kb8 Qd8+ 1/2-1/2

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Matras-Clement, Agnieszka"]
[Black "Baciu, Diana"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B34"]
[WhiteElo "2225"]
[BlackElo "2124"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "97"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 g6 3. d4 Bg7 4. Nc3 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Nc6 6. Be3 {[#]} Qa5 $6 {
A rare and poor-scoring sideline... possibly a move-order error.  The usual 6..
.Nf6 aiming for a quick ...d5 is one of the main points of the accelerated
Dragon. If White stops ...d5 with 7.Bc4 then Black might try 7...Qa5!?, which
probably doesn't equalize, but White's best response (8.0-0) means there's no
Yugoslav Attack.} (6... Nf6 7. Bc4 Qa5 $5 8. O-O $1 $14) 7. Qd2 Nf6 8. f3 a6 9.
O-O-O b5 10. Nb3 Qc7 11. Nd5 Nxd5 12. exd5 Ne5 {[#]} 13. d6 $5 (13. Bh6 $1 Bxh6
(13... O-O 14. h4 $16 {with a Yugoslav-type attack where Black is already
missing his crucial Nf6.}) 14. Qxh6 Bb7 15. Kb1 Rc8 16. c3 b4 {looks deadly
for Black, but White comes out on top:} (16... Qd6 17. Qg7 $14) 17. Qg7 Rf8 18.
c4 $1 $18 (18. d6 $1 {also wins} exd6 19. Qf6 bxc3 20. Rxd6 c2+ 21. Kc1 Nc6 22.
Bc4 $18) 18... Nxc4 19. Bxc4 (19. Rc1 $4 Nd2+ $19) 19... Qxc4 20. d6 $1 Rc6 (
20... exd6 21. Rhe1+ $18) (20... Bd5 21. Rc1 $18) 21. Na5 Qc2+ 22. Ka1 Rb6 23.
Nxb7 Rxb7 24. Rc1 $19) 13... exd6 14. Qxd6 (14. f4 Nc4 15. Bxc4 bxc4 16. Bd4 $1
{clearing the center files for White's majors while trading the Bg7 might be a
better way to exploit Black's mangled pawns.}) 14... Qxd6 15. Rxd6 O-O 16. Nc5
Re8 17. Bf2 Bf8 18. Rd1 d6 19. Ne4 Re6 20. h4 Bb7 21. Ng5 Ree8 22. Bd3 $6 {
Why you no love your Bishop? Why??!!??} (22. h5 $5 Bh6 (22... h6) (22... gxh5)
23. f4 Ng4 24. Bd4 $13) 22... Nxd3+ 23. Rxd3 Re2 24. Rd2 Rae8 25. Kd1 Rxd2+ 26.
Kxd2 f6 27. Nh3 Bh6+ 28. Kd3 $2 (28. Kd1 $15) 28... Bc8 $1 29. Re1 $1 (29. g4
$2 Bb7 $17 {makes things worse.}) 29... Bf5+ 30. Kd4 (30. Kc3 $4 Rc8+ $19)
30... Rxe1 31. Bxe1 Bxc2 32. Bg3 (32. Kd5 $5 {is a good practical try. White
can win the d6 pawn, but there's a risk of the Nh3 getting trapped; e.g.} Kf7
$1 (32... Bb1 33. a3 Bf8 34. Bb4 Ba2+ 35. Kc6 $132) (32... Bf8 33. Bb4) (32...
Bc1 33. Bc3 Kf7 34. Kxd6 Be3 35. Kc6 Bd3 $17) 33. Kxd6 Bb1 34. a3 Bc1 35. Bc3
Be3 $17 {threatening ...Bd3-f1.}) 32... Bb1 33. a4 $5 (33. a3 Bc1 $17) 33...
bxa4 34. Bxd6 $17 {With the B pair and an extra (half) pawn, Black should win
this... but her next move cuts her advantage in half.} Bf8 $2 (34... Bg7 $17) (
34... Kf7 $17) 35. Bxf8 Kxf8 36. Nf4 Kf7 37. Nd5 h5 38. Nb4 $1 a5 39. Nc6 Ke6
40. Nxa5 Kf5 41. Ke3 Ba2 42. Nc6 g5 43. hxg5 fxg5 44. Nd4+ Ke5 45. Ne2 h4 46.
Nc3 Bb3 47. Ne4 Kf5 48. Nd6+ Ke5 49. Ne4 1/2-1/2

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Hincu, Olga"]
[Black "Zhou, Qiyu"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A17"]
[WhiteElo "2124"]
[BlackElo "2207"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "84"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

{White gets creative in a nearly symmetrical Colle-Zukertort vs QID, and Black
turns those wasted tempi into a winning advantage before move 20. White misses
chances to escape to a slightly worse ending and gets completly tied up by
Black's far more active pieces.} 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. e3 e6 3. c4 d5 4. Nc3 b6 5. b3
Bb7 6. Bb2 a6 $5 (6... Nbd7 7. g3 Bd6 8. Bg2 O-O 9. O-O Re8 10. Rc1 a6 11. Qe2
dxc4 12. bxc4 b5 13. cxb5 axb5 14. Nxb5 Rxa2 15. d4 Qb8 16. Ra1 Rxa1 17. Rxa1
Bf8 18. Nc3 c5 19. Rb1 cxd4 20. Nxd4 Bxg2 21. Kxg2 Qa8+ {½-½ Wei,Y (2743)
-Giri,A (2752) Wijk aan Zee 2018}) 7. Qc2 (7. cxd5 exd5 8. d4 Bd6 9. g3 O-O 10.
Bg2 Nbd7 11. O-O Qe7 12. a4 Ne4 $11 {1/2-1/2 (22) Karjakin,S (2785)-So,W (2808)
Wijk aan Zee 2017}) 7... Bd6 8. Be2 h6 9. d4 Nbd7 10. Nd2 $6 {A very strange
move. Was White hoping to force through e4 before castling?} c5 (10... Rc8 11.
e4 $5 c5 $1 12. e5 cxd4 $13) (10... dxc4 $2 11. Nxc4 Bxg2 12. Rg1 $14) 11. a4
$6 (11. dxc5 Nxc5 $11 (11... bxc5 $11)) 11... O-O 12. Ba3 $6 ({I don't
understand why, but after} 12. O-O {engines rate Black around a 1/2 pawn
better. That's hard to explain, since both sides have all their pieces
developed, and White already has his Rs connected while Black does not. Is it
the superior activity of Black's DSB? Maybe it has something to do withthe d4
square?}) 12... Qc7 $15 13. Bf3 Rfe8 {Black has other ways to play, but Qiyu
points her pieces at the K.} (13... Rfc8 $5 14. cxd5 $2 cxd4 15. Bxd6 (15. exd4
Bxa3) 15... Qxd6 16. exd4 Ne5 $1 $19 {pepetrating.} (16... Nxd5 $17)) 14. Kf1 {
After this, when the center opens White will be playing without his Rh1.} (14.
O-O $2 Bxh2+ $17 {shows why the N belongs on f3.}) (14. Ne2 e5 $17) (14. cxd5
cxd4 15. Bxd6 Qxc3 $17) 14... cxd4 15. Bxd6 Qxd6 16. exd4 e5 $1 $19 17. Nxd5
Nxd5 18. cxd5 Bxd5 (18... exd4 19. Nc4 Qc5 $19 {the d5 pawn will drop and
White is playing with only one R.}) 19. Nc4 Bxc4+ 20. bxc4 Rac8 21. d5 Qb4 $2 (
21... b5 {is better} $1 {wins a pawn and rips open central lines for Black's Rs.} 22.
axb5 axb5 23. Be2 Nb6 $19) 22. Be2 Nc5 23. Rb1 (23. Ra2 {is better} $15 {hoping for
g3 and Kg2.}) 23... Qxa4 24. Qxa4 Nxa4 25. Rb4 b5 26. g3 (26. cxb5 $4 {loses to
} Rc1+ $19) 26... Nc3 27. d6 $4 (27. cxb5 $1 {could reach a technical ending
which would be very hard for Black to win; e.g.} Nxd5 28. Rb2 Rc1+ 29. Kg2 Rxh1
30. Kxh1 axb5 31. Rxb5 $15) 27... Red8 28. cxb5 axb5 29. d7 Rc5 $1 (29... Rxd7
$2 {is bad, but doesn't even give away all of Black's advantage after} 30. Bg4
f5 31. Bxf5 Rd1+ $17) 30. Bg4 g6 $1 31. Kg2 f5 32. Bd1 Rxd7 {Black is up two
pawns and White is still playing without her Rh1.} 33. Bb3+ Kg7 34. Be6 Rd6 35.
Bb3 Rd2 36. h4 Rb2 37. Ra1 Nd5 {What a predicament. White plays some spite
checks to avoid resigning (in a team game) so early.} 38. Ra7+ Kf8 39. Ra8+ Ke7
40. Ra7+ Kd8 41. Ra8+ Kc7 42. Ra7+ Kb6 0-1

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Demchenko, Svitlana"]
[Black "Petrenko, Svetlana"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B09"]
[WhiteElo "2134"]
[BlackElo "2156"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "108"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

{A complicated game. Black plays a passive line in the Pirc (...c6) and gets
into serious trouble, but both players make similiar mistakes -- bringing
pieces to the queenside when they could crash through on the kingside -- and
eventually settle on a draw in an equal and almost totally blocked position.} 
1. e4 d6 2. d4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. f4 Nf6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Bd3 c6 7. Be3 {This may
be a bit slack: the B is exposed here, it's not needed to defend d4, it might
go directly to g5 or h6; and since White is almost certainly going to castle
kingside,} (7. O-O $1 {is more popular, better scoring, and recommended in
recent repertoire books by John Shaw (Quality) and Alex Kornev (Chess Stars).}
Qb6 {hitting d4 and b2 isn't a real threat; e.g.} 8. Kh1 Bg4 9. a3 $5 {sets a
cute trap} Bxf3 10. Qxf3 Qxd4 $2 11. Be3 {traps the Qd4.}) 7... b5 8. e5 Ng4 (
8... dxe5 $2 9. fxe5 Nd5 10. Nxd5 Qxd5 11. O-O $16) 9. Bg1 f5 (9... Na6 10. h3
Nh6 11. a4 b4 12. Ne4 f6 (12... Nc7) 13. Qd2 Rb8 14. h4 d5 15. Ng3 {not a
position to look at on a full stomach. 1-0 (33) Vegjeleki,A (2320)-Deneuville,
C (2187) ICCF email 2014}) 10. h3 Nh6 11. h4 Qe8 12. Ne2 Na6 13. h5 (13. Qd2
{is better} {doesn't let Black trade the Na6 for the Bd3.} c5 14. c4 $1 $16 (14. Qa5
$1 $16)) 13... Nb4 14. a3 Nxd3+ 15. Qxd3 Be6 16. hxg6 (16. Ng5 Bc4 17. Qh3 gxh5
18. b3 Bd5 19. Nc3 Bf7 20. Nxf7 Qxf7 21. Qxh5 $14) 16... Qxg6 17. Ng5 Bc4 18.
Qf3 Bd5 (18... Ng4 19. Nxh7 (19. Qxc6 h6 20. Nf3 Rac8 $17) 19... Rfd8 20. exd6
Rxd6 21. O-O-O Bh6 $13) 19. Qh3 Rfc8 20. O-O-O a5 21. Ng3 b4 22. Nh5 (22. a4 $1
) 22... bxa3 23. Qxa3 Bxg2 $4 (23... Bf8 24. Rd3 Ng4 25. Rg3 Rab8 26. Rh4 Rb5
27. Nh3 Rcb8 28. b3 Qe6 29. Ng5 Qg6) 24. Rh2 $18 Bd5 25. Nxg7 $1 Kxg7 26. Bf2
$2 (26. Rd3 $1 {aiming for Rdh3 is crushing.}) 26... Bg8 (26... Rh8 {is better} 27. c4
Ng4 $132) 27. Bh4 $4 (27. Rdh1 $18 Ng4 28. Rxh7+ Bxh7 29. Rxh7+ Kg8 (29... Qxh7
30. Nxh7 Nxf2 (30... Kxh7 31. Bh4 $18) 31. Ng5 $18 {By a standard point count
Black is ahead (RR v Q), but Black's K is exposed and has a lot of loose pawns,
both of which tip the scales toward the Q.}) 30. Be1 $18 (30. Qh3 $2 Nxf2 31.
Rh8+ Kg7 32. Rh7+ Kg8)) 27... Ng4 28. Re2 Ra7 (28... Re8 {is better} $14) 29. Be1 (29.
d5 $1 {a line clearing sac} cxd5 (29... Bxd5 $2 30. Qc3 {threatening Rxd5 and
exd6+}) 30. Nf3 Kh8 31. Be1 Qh6 32. exd6 Qxf4+ 33. Bd2 Qxd6 34. Bc3+ Rxc3 {only move.}
35. Qxc3+ $14) 29... Bc4 30. Rg2 Bd5 31. Rg3 Rca8 32. Nf3 Be4 33. Nd2 Bd5 34.
c4 Bf7 35. Rc3 Qh6 36. Bg3 Kh8 37. Nf3 Bg8 (37... d5 38. c5 a4 {all the play
in the center and kingside is gone and Black is up a pawn.}) 38. Nh4 Rf8 39.
Kb1 (39. exd6 $1 exd6 40. d5) 39... d5 40. c5 e6 41. Qa4 Rc8 42. Rb3 Bf7 43.
Rb6 $2 (43. Rdd3 Be8 44. Rb6 $11) 43... Be8 (43... Ne3 $1 $17 44. Rg1 Qh5 45.
Rxc6 Rg8 $1 {a hard move to see, switching sides and going away from
opponent's K.} 46. Qb3 (46. Bf2 Rxg1+ 47. Bxg1 Nc4) 46... Nc4 $19) 44. Rd3 Qg7
45. Be1 Rca8 46. Rdb3 Qc7 47. Nf3 h6 48. Bh4 Kg8 49. Nd2 Kf8 50. Nf3 Kf7 51.
Nd2 Bd7 52. Nf3 Kf8 53. Kc1 Be8 54. Kb1 Bd7 1/2-1/2

[Event "Olympiad w"]
[Site "Batumi GEO"]
[Date "2018.09.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Partac, Elena"]
[Black "Agbabishvili, Lali"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B53"]
[WhiteElo "2051"]
[BlackElo "2128"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "96"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4 {An anti-Najdorf line that several top
players, including Karjakin, regularly play in blitz.} a6 {prevents Bb5, and
so guarantees that ...Nc6 gets a tempo off the impatient Q.} 5. c4 Nc6 6. Qd2 {
The most popluar retreat, though currently 6.Qe3 is more fashionable at the
top levels.} (6. Qe3 Bg4 7. Nd4 g6 8. Nc3 Bg7 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. h3 Be6 11. Be2
Nf6 12. O-O O-O $14 {1-0 (50) Karjakin,S (2763)-Nepomniachtchi,I (2751) Moscow
2018}) 6... Nf6 7. Nc3 Bg4 (7... g6 8. b3 Bg7 9. Bb2 O-O 10. h3 Qa5 11. Bd3 Re8
(11... b5 $5 12. cxb5 axb5 13. a4 $1 Qb4 14. axb5 Rxa1+ 15. Bxa1 Na5 16. Ne2 (
16. O-O $2 Nxb3 $15 17. Qb2 Be6 {0-1 (52) Bengherabi,K (2201)-Savchenko,S 
(2521) Algiers 2015}) 16... Qxb3 17. O-O $14) 12. a3 e6 13. b4 Qd8 $14 {
1/2-1/2 (78) Heidenfeld,M (2376)-Jones,G (2670) Bunratty 2015}) 8. Nd4 (8. Be2
g6 9. b3 Bg7 10. Bb2 O-O 11. O-O Qa5 12. Qe3 Rfc8 13. Rab1 Nd7 14. a3 Bxf3 15.
Bxf3 Qb6 16. Qxb6 Nxb6 17. Nd5 Nd7 18. Bg4 e6 19. Ne3 h5 20. Bf3 Bxb2 21. Rxb2
Nf6 22. Rd1 Ne8 23. Be2 Kf8 24. h3 Ke7 {1/2-1/2 (64) Dzhumaev,M (2457)-Motylev,
A (2532) Linares 2000}) 8... g6 (8... Nxd4 9. Qxd4 g6 {looks like an OK
Maroczy for Black.}) 9. Nc2 Bg7 10. h3 Bd7 11. Be2 Rc8 12. Rb1 Ne5 13. b3 Bc6
14. f4 $6 (14. Qe3 b5 $5 15. cxb5 Bxb5 16. Nxb5 Rxc2 17. Nc3 d5 $1 $13) 14...
Ned7 15. Bf3 O-O 16. O-O Nc5 17. Qe3 b6 18. Bb2 a5 $2 (18... Nfd7 19. Nb4 Ba8
20. e5 $14) 19. Nd5 (19. Nd4 {is better} Ba8 (19... Bd7 20. e5 $16) (19... Nfd7 20.
Nxc6 Rxc6 21. Rbd1 $16) 20. e5 Nfd7 21. Bxa8 Rxa8 22. Nc6 Qe8 23. Nd5 $18 {
hitting e7 and c7.}) 19... e6 20. Nxf6+ Bxf6 21. Bxf6 Qxf6 22. Rbd1 e5 $1 23.
fxe5 (23. f5 $5) 23... Qxe5 (23... dxe5 $2 24. Bg4 $16) 24. Rd4 Rce8 25. Rfd1
$2 {White definitely missed something here, though there's no telling what.} (
25. Qd2 {is better} Bxe4 26. Re1 f5 27. Rxd6 $13) 25... Bxe4 $1 26. Bxe4 (26. Rxd6 $2
Bxc2 $19) 26... Nxe4 {defending d6.} 27. Re1 f5 $17 28. Rd5 $6 (28. Qd3 Qc5 29.
Kh2 Re5 30. Ne3 Rfe8 31. Rd5 Qc6 $17) 28... Qb2 {only move.} $19 29. Nd4 Nf6 $19 30. Ne6
Nxd5 31. cxd5 Rf7 32. Re2 Qa1+ 33. Kf2 Qd1 34. Rd2 Qc1 35. Qd4 b5 36. Rd1 Qc2+
37. Rd2 Qe4 38. Qxe4 fxe4+ 39. Ke3 Rc8 40. Kxe4 Rf5 41. g4 Rf1 42. Kd4 Rcc1 43.
Rd3 Rfd1 44. Ng5 Rxd3+ 45. Kxd3 Rd1+ 46. Ke4 Ra1 47. Kd4 Kg7 48. Ne4 Rd1+ $1 {
Wins the d pawn.} 0-1
merida
46

..

Author: John Upper
Posted: September 27, 2018, 7:30 am