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Canadian Chess Newsfeed

The diagram is a puzzle created by Martin Thoresen to celebrate the 10th TCEC: with pieces in the shape of a 10, it is mate in 10. 

The key move, with some of the many variations, is shown below.



Schachbundesliga
Oct 21-22, 2017

Rounds 1 and 2 of the German Chess League are on this weekend. Top players include: MVL, Anand, Svidler, Adams, Bacrot, Kasimdzhanov... and that's just perennial champions Baden-Baden!

http://www.schachbundesliga.de/liveportal  


 Chess.Com Speed Chess Championship
Oct 23 & 24, 2017

Two matches this week:

  • Oct. 23: Maxime-Vachier Lagrave vs Alexander Grischuk 
  • Oct. 24: Sergey Karjakin vs Ian Nepomniachtchi

Matches start at 10am PDT, 1pm EST

The format for the Chess.com matches is 3 hours of online play, broken into four formats: 

  1. 90 minutes of 5+2 blitz, 
  2. 60 minutes of 3+2 blitz,
  3. 30 minutes of 1+1 bullet,
  4. one chess960 game in each time control.  

Live Games (with commentary by FM Danny Rensch and ...?)

https://www.chess.com/tv

http://www.twitch.tv/Chess 


 TCEC Season 10

The only computer chess event that matters is the Thoresen Chess Engine Competion. Engines play on identical hardware and use identical opening books, making it the best test of playing strength. It's also the event that the engine developers take seriously, with the top ones submitting development builds of their best programs, including Stockfish, Komodo, Houdini, and Fire.

This year's big innovation is the upgraded hardware: an exceptionally powerful 44 core Xeon server, more than double the power last year's host.

Like it or not, this tournament will have a strong claim to featuring the best chess ever played.

TCEC Season 10 consists of three stages:  

  • Stage 1: 24 engines; single round robin; TC: 60m + 10s. 
  • Stage 2: The top 8 engines from stage 1 play a double RR; TC: 90m + 10s.
  • Superfinal: Top 2 from stage 2 play a 100 game match.

 With the exception of stage 1, engines play both sides of each opening book position.

Live Games  24/7 :

http://tcec.chessdom.com/live.php 



 The diagram is a puzzle created by Martin Thoresen to celebrate the 10th TCEC: with pieces in the shape of a 10, it is mate in 10:

..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "TCEC 10 puzzle"]
[Site "chessdom"]
[Date "2017.10.21"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Mate in 10"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "8/1r3pr1/1P2k2B/1p2p2R/1p2P2N/1P2K2n/1R3PP1/8 w - - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "13"]

{[#]} 1. Bxg7 {There are multiple defences available, but none push the mate
back beyond 10 moves. I have included a few in the solution.} f6 (1... Nf4 2.
Rh6+ Ng6 3. Rc2 Rd7 (3... Ke7 4. Nxg6+ fxg6 5. Bxe5 {#5}) 4. Rc6+ Rd6 5. Nxg6
f6 6. Rc7 Rxb6 7. Bxf6 Kxf6 8. f4 exf4+ 9. Kxf4 Ke6 10. Nh4#) (1... Rxb6 2.
Rh6+ (2. Rd2 {transposes.}) 2... f6 3. Rxf6+ {#7} (3. Ra2 {#7})) (1... f5 2.
exf5+ Kf7 3. Bxe5 {#7} (3. gxh3 {#7})) (1... f6 2. gxh3 Rxb6 3. Rc2 {#7.}) 2.
gxh3 Rxb6 (2... Rxg7 3. Rd2 Rd7 4. Nf5 Rxd2 5. Kxd2 Kd7 6. Rh7+ Kc6 7. b7 {#2})
3. Rc2 Rd6 4. Bxf6 Rd1 (4... Kxf6 5. Rc7 {#4}) 5. Nf3 Kxf6 6. Rc7 Kg6 7. Rch7 {
#3} *
merida
46

..

Author: John Upper
Posted: October 21, 2017, 6:04 pm

The 88th FIDE Congress in Turkey ended October 15, 2017, with two new titles for Canadians: IM for Michael Kleinman, FA for Vadim Tsypin.

Michael's final IM Norm, along with one of his annotated games, was reported on the CFC Newsfeed:
http://chess.ca/newsfeed/node/990

While International Master is a title almost all chess fans can envy, Vadim's title may well be the more instructive and inspiring one, especially for older chess fans: it's not often that someone steps out of retirement to successfully start a "second career" but Vadim was an arbiter at the Canadian Zonal, Montreal Open, Varennes International, and many other competitions, especially those organized by the FQE and Chess 'n Math.

Unlike the (probably) mythical "Self-Taught Chess Master", it should be obvious that noone becomes a FIDE Arbiter without working with and learning from many organizers and officials. With this in mind, Vadim would like to, "extend sincere thanks to my experienced colleagues whose character, skills and professionalism became the standards I strive to emulate. In alphabetical order": 

  • IA Serge Archambault
  • NA Alexandre Ber
  • FA Andrei Botez
  • Sylvain De Lagrave
  • IA Pierre Dénommée
  • NA Raymond Desjardins
  • IA/FT Eduard Duchovny (USA)
  • Andrew Giblon
  • IA Danny Goldenberg
  • FA Aivars Laizans (LAT)
  • S. Warren Lohr (USA)
  • IA/IO Aris Marghetis
  • FA Bernard Ouimet
  • GM/FA/FST Susan Polgar (USA)
  • FA Rene Preotu
  • IA/IO/FI Mihail Prevenios (GRE)
  • IA Alexander F. Relyea (USA)
  • IA Francis Rodriguez
  • GM/FT Eduardas Rozentalis (LTU)
  • IA Ashot Vardapetyan (ARM)

And thanks to the Chess'n Math Association (Larry Bevand), the Fédération québécoise des échecs (Bernard Labadie, Richard Bérubé), and the Chess Federation of Canada (Vlad Drkulec, Fred McKim) for their, "trust, encouragement, and the wonderful opportunities". 

And, last but not least, CFC Executive Director Bob Gillanders and the FIDE Zone 2.2 President and Delegate IA/IO Hal Bond for their "endless patience". 

 (photo: Vadim Tsypin, recording clock times on the 1/2 hour during the 2017 Canadian Zonal.)

Vadim Tsypin FIDE Card

 https://ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?event=2623463

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: October 20, 2017, 9:32 pm

The Jamaica International Chess Festival took place Oct. 12-15, 2017.

Organized and hosted by Jamaican-born GM Maurice Ashley, it was a multi-part event which successfully raised the profile of chess in Jamaica. 

Four of the top young players from the US and Canada were invited and gave talks and simuls at schools, played all-comers at 3min blitz, talked with the Prime Minister of Jamaica, competed in a 4-round team rapid match, and more. They're in the photo above, L2R:

    • GM Awonder Liang - 2017 US Jr. Champion. 
    • WGM Qiyu Zhou - 2016 Canadian Womens Champion
    • GM Maurice Ashley - Organizer and Promoter
    • WIM Akshita Gorti - 2017 US Jr. Girls Champion
    • GM Akshat Chandra - 2015 US Jr. Champion 

Qiyu wrote a report, illustrated by photos from her mom Penny, which you can read on ChessBase:

http://en.chessbase.com/post/first-jamaica-international-festival

Author: John Upper
Posted: October 19, 2017, 12:09 am

Phil Haley: 1924-2017

Phil Haley, long-time Canadian chess organizer, International Arbiter, Olympiad official, and chess player, died at the age of 94. 

In 1977 he was awarded a medal from the Governor General of Canada for his contributions to Canadian chess. 

At the 2016 Baku Olympiad he was made made a FIDE Honorary Member, joining long-time chess contributors as Max Euwe, Victor Kortchnoi, Arpad Elo, and Canada's John Prentice. 

Among his contributions: President of the CFC (71-73), FIDE rep for Canada (94-99), and a FIDE official at multiple Olympiads.

Rather than repeat all is his achievments and awards, the Newsfeed suggests reading the excellent Obit in the Globe and Mail, and reading (and contributing) to the posts about Phil on ChessTalk (links below).

Globe and Mail Obituary

http://v1.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/Deaths.20171014.93393945/BDAStory/BDA/deaths

ChessTalk posts

http://forum.chesstalk.com/showthread.php?16384-Phil-Haley-1924-2017-R-I-P


Six Decades Playing Against Canada's Best

Reviewing databases shows that Phil Haley played against the very best Canadians for a full 60 years! What is remarkable is not Phil's results -- he has a losing record against the best, as does almost everyone -- but the fact that these games span a full 60 years, most of them at Canadian Opens ranging across the country, the last one sees him playing a 28-year-old GM when Phil was 81 years old.

Below are six annotated games against six of the best Canadian chess players:

    • 1945 - Abe Yanofsky
    • 1953 - Frank Anderson
    • 1962 - Lawrence Day
    • 1988 - Bryon Nickoloff
    • 1999 - Kevin Spraggett
    • 2005 - Dimitri Tyomkin

No doubt this list could be extended if more games were available. 


 


() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "CAN-ch"]
[Site "Saskatoon CAN"]
[Date "1945.??.??"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Haley, Phil"]
[Black "Yanofsky, Abe"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B50"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "100"]
[EventDate "1945.??.??"]
[EventType "tourn"]
[EventRounds "12"]
[EventCountry "CAN"]
[SourceTitle "HCL 41"]

{"I joined the Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer reserve. I was on Atlantic duty
until June, 1945, when I went home on leave and spent part of it defending my
Canadian title at Saskatoon." - Yanofsky, Chess the Hard Way.} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3
d6 3. c3 Nf6 4. Na3 $146 Nc6 (4... Nxe4 $4 5. Qa4+ $18) 5. d4 cxd4 6. cxd4 {[#]
} d5 $11 (6... Nxe4 $1 {allows White to get some annoying play for the pawn,
but Black comes out ahead in the end:} 7. d5 Qa5+ (7... Na5 $4 8. Qa4+ $18) 8.
Bd2 Nxd2 $15 (8... Qxd5 $5) 9. Qxd2 Qxd2+ 10. Kxd2 Nb4 11. Nb5 Nxd5 12. Bc4 Bd7
13. Nxd6+ $15 {White will have a big lead in development, but Black will have
an extra pawn and his B-pair should be able to keep out the White Rooks.}) 7.
e5 Ne4 (7... Nd7 8. Nc2 {is a decent advance French for White.}) 8. Nc2 Qa5+ 9.
Nd2 Bf5 10. Be2 Qb6 11. Nf3 Qa5+ 12. Nd2 Rc8 13. O-O Nxd2 14. Bxd2 Qb6 15. Bc3
$14 e6 (15... Bxc2 16. Qxc2 Nxd4 $2 17. Qa4+ Nc6 18. e6 $1 $16) 16. a4 Be7 17.
Ne3 Be4 18. f3 Bg6 19. f4 Be4 20. a5 Qc7 21. Bf3 Bxf3 22. Rxf3 (22. Qxf3 g6 23.
f5 $5 gxf5 24. g4 $5 {unclear.}) 22... f5 23. g3 (23. exf6 $5 Bxf6 (23... gxf6 $4 24.
f5 $18) 24. Ng4 {unclear.}) 23... Bb4 $5 {[#] Trading the DSB for the blob on c3
looks totally anti-positional. OTOH, the threat to the a5-pawn gives White a
choice of allowing Black to trade on c3, leaving c3 backward on a half-open
file, or trading DSBs and leaving the d4-pawn as a target.} 24. Bxb4 (24. a6 $5
) 24... Nxb4 25. Qa4+ Nc6 26. Rc1 a6 27. b4 O-O 28. Nf1 Qb8 29. Rd3 {[#]} (29.
Qa1 $2 Nxd4 30. Rxc8 Nxf3+ $19) 29... Nxd4 $3 $17 {Well calculated!} 30. Rxc8
Rxc8 31. Qd7 {Taking the N loses the exchange.} (31. Rxd4 Qa7 32. b5 axb5 33.
Qb4 Rc4 $19) 31... Rd8 32. Qe7 Re8 33. Qc5 Nb5 34. Rd1 {[#] Black has an extra
pawn which is also a protected passed pawn, and so he simply threatens to
trade pieces, which will leave him with either a winning pawn ending, or a
winning ending with an extra pawn and more active pieces.} Qa7 35. Rc1 Qxc5+
36. Rxc5 Kf7 37. Kf2 Ke7 38. Ne3 Kd7 39. Rc2 Rc8 {[#]} 40. Rd2 $2 {Now Black
has an extra pawn and controls the only open file.} (40. Rxc8 $142 Kxc8 41. Nc2
Kc7 42. Ke2 {Black is obviously much better, but the backwards pawn on e6 
(which can be attacked from d4 or c5) gives Black headaches.} Nc3+ $6 (42...
Kc6 43. Kd3) 43. Kd3 Ne4 44. Nd4 Kd7 45. Nb3 {How will Black improve?}) 40...
Rc3 41. Nc2 Rc4 42. Ke3 Na7 43. Ke2 Nc6 44. b5 axb5 45. Na3 Rc5 46. Rb2 b4 47.
Nc2 Rxc2+ $1 48. Rxc2 Nd4+ 49. Kd3 Nxc2 50. Kxc2 Kc6 {Black will be up three
pawns. Black went on to tie for first with Frank Yerhoff (each with +9 =3) in
this Canadian Championship.} 0-1

[Event "Ontario ch"]
[Site "Toronto CAN"]
[Date "1952.04.12"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Anderson, Frank"]
[Black "Haley, Phil"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C43"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "53"]
[EventDate "1952.04.11"]
[EventType "tourn"]
[EventRounds "6"]
[EventCountry "CAN"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. d4 exd4 (3... Nxe4 {is better-scoring and more popular
these days, but both moves have a long history.}) 4. e5 Ne4 5. Qxd4 d5 6. exd6
Nxd6 7. Nc3 Nc6 8. Qf4 {[#]} Be7 (8... Nf5 9. Bb5 Bd6 10. Qe4+ Qe7 11. Bg5 $6 (
11. Bd2 $5 {Kasparov}) 11... f6 12. Bd2 Bd7 13. O-O-O Qxe4 14. Nxe4 Be7 15. g4
a6 16. Bc4 Nd6 17. Nxd6+ Bxd6 18. Rde1+ {½-½ Kasparov,G (2800)-Karpov,A 
(2730) Lyon/New York W.Ch. 1990.}) (8... Bf5 9. Bb5 Be7 10. Nd4 Bd7 11. Bxc6
Bxc6 12. Nxc6 bxc6 13. O-O O-O 14. Be3 $14 {0-1 (32) Chigorin,M-Pillsbury,H St
Petersburg 1896}) 9. Bd3 a5 {Hoping to get rid of the Bd3 with ...Nb4.} 10. a3
{Stopping ...Nb4. Both sides have spent a tempo with their a-pawns, but the
pair of moves is good for White: White's a3-pawn is defended by a pawn, while
Black's a5-pawn will either have to be defended by pieces or by moving his
b-pawn, which will weaken his queenside light squares.} Be6 11. O-O h6 12. Be3
g5 {Consistent with ...h6, but Black's K won't be safe on either side now, and
soon White's Rs will be on the open center files.} 13. Qa4 Qd7 14. Rad1 Bg4 (
14... O-O 15. h4 $1 g4 16. Nd4 {when Black's loose kingside promises trouble.})
15. Be4 (15. Nd5 $1 Bxf3 16. gxf3 O-O 17. c4 $16 Nf5 $2 18. Bxf5 Qxf5 19. Qxc6
$1) 15... O-O-O $4 {This loses outright. Black has played creatively to get an
unbalanced middlegame, but the only way to hold it together requires very
precise tactics.} (15... Ne5 {Only move.} 16. Nxe5 (16. Qd4 $5 Bxf3 17. Qxe5 f6 18. Qd5
Bxd1 19. Rxd1 {White has comp.}) 16... Qxa4 17. Rde1 $3 {unclear.} {Black is up a Q
for a N, but there is no way to save the Q.} (17. Nxa4 $6 Bxd1 18. Bxb7 Nxb7
19. Rxd1 $17)) 16. Bxc6 Qxc6 (16... bxc6 17. Qxa5 Qf5 18. Ne5 $1 $18) 17. Qxg4+
$18 {White is up a whole piece.} f5 18. Qa4 Qxa4 19. Nxa4 g4 20. Ne5 Rdg8 21.
Nc3 h5 22. Nd5 Bd8 {[#]White treats us to a very pretty finish:} 23. Nb6+ $1
Kb8 24. Ned7+ Ka7 25. Rd5 $1 Ka6 26. Nb8+ $1 Ka7 27. Rxa5+ {It's Ra8# next.}
1-0

[Event "CAN-op"]
[Site "Ottawa CAN"]
[Date "1962.08.31"]
[Round "10"]
[White "Day, Lawrence"]
[Black "Haley, Phil"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B01"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "35"]
[EventDate "1962.08.26"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "9"]
[EventCountry "CAN"]

1. e4 {Day was 17 when this game was played.} d5 2. Nf3 $5 {The Tennyson
gambit.} dxe4 3. Ng5 {If Black's c-pawn was on c5 this would be a reversed
Budapest. That would be good for White, except here (unlike a regular Budapest)
Black can respond to Bb5+ with ...c6.} Nf6 (3... e5 $5 {returns the pawn for
free development.} 4. d4 (4. Nxe4 f5 $15) 4... exd3 5. Bxd3 Be7 $15) (3... Bf5
$1 4. Nc3 (4. g4) 4... Nf6 5. f3 exf3 6. Qxf3 e6 7. Qxb7 Nbd7 $15 {is similar
to a Blackmar-Diemer Gambit.}) 4. Bc4 e6 5. Nc3 b6 6. Ncxe4 (6. f3 exf3) 6...
Nxe4 7. Nxe4 Bb7 8. d3 Bxe4 $6 (8... Be7 9. Qg4 Nc6 $1 {is the computer's move}
(9... O-O 10. Bh6 Bf6 11. O-O-O $14) 10. Qxg7 Qd4 $1 11. Qg3 (11. Bh6 Qxg7 12.
Bxg7 Rg8 $15) 11... O-O-O $15) 9. dxe4 $14 Qxd1+ 10. Kxd1 Bc5 11. Ke2 O-O 12.
Rd1 Nc6 13. Be3 $6 {Giving up the B pair can't be White's best.} (13. c3 $1 $14
Ne5 14. Bb3 Ng4 $6 15. f3 $16 {the N goes back or gets trapped.}) 13... Bxe3
14. Kxe3 Rad8 15. c3 Ne5 16. Be2 c5 17. f4 Ng6 18. g3 $16 {White has the
better minor piece, more space, and a more active K. I would expect a more
experienced version of Lawrence to push here.} 1/2-1/2

[Event "CAN-op"]
[Site "Scarborough CAN"]
[Date "1988.07.15"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Haley, Phil"]
[Black "Nickoloff, Bryon"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "A48"]
[WhiteElo "1795"]
[BlackElo "2439"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "50"]
[EventDate "1988.07.15"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "10"]
[EventCountry "CAN"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Nbd2 $5 {White threatens e2-e4 when Black would be
playing a Pirc rather than a KID. Black can stop this with ...d5, but that
mightn't be the kind of unbalanced position Black would enjoy. From what I
know about Bryon, he probably spent 20+ minutes on this position ... :)} c5 4.
e3 {A Colle System.} (4. dxc5 Qa5 5. a3 Qxc5 6. b4 {would be a sort of
reversed Catalan.}) 4... Qc7 $146 5. c3 d5 6. Ne5 Bg7 7. Be2 (7. Bd3 {looks
like the natural square, since Black's not going to threaten ...e5-e4.}) 7...
O-O 8. O-O b6 9. f4 Bb7 $5 (9... Ba6 {would be the stereotypical way to trade
the good B in this reversed Stonewall.}) 10. Qe1 Ne8 11. Qg3 f6 12. Ng4 (12.
Nxg6 $5 hxg6 13. Qxg6 Nd6 $15) 12... e6 13. Nf3 Nd6 14. Bd2 Qe7 15. Qh3 Ba6 16.
Rae1 Bxe2 17. Rxe2 Nd7 18. Rfe1 {[#]Bryon's play has been a model of how to
play against a Stonewall: use the f-pawn to keep your oppnent from getting the
e-file outpost, trade the opponent's good B, keep options of breaking in the
center or expanding on the queenside.} e5 $6 (18... a5 $5 {aiming to squeeze
the queenside.}) (18... f5 $5 {Stops e4, which leaves White's doubled rooks
looking stupid, and aims for a middlegame/ending with the better minor piece:}
19. Nge5 Nxe5 20. Nxe5 (20. fxe5 Ne4 $15) 20... Bxe5 $15) 19. dxe5 $1 fxe5 20.
Ng5 (20. e4 $5 Nxe4 21. Ne3 {unclear.}) 20... Bf6 (20... h5 $5 {is disgusting-looking,
but not so bad:} 21. Nf2 e4 22. g4 Bf6 $17) 21. Ne6 $1 Rfc8 (21... Qxe6 $4 {
loses the Q} 22. Nh6+) 22. Nh6+ Kh8 23. fxe5 Bxe5 $6 {Gives up control of g5.}
(23... Nxe5 $142 $1 {unclear.}) 24. e4 $1 Nxe4 (24... dxe4 25. Rf2 {threatening Ng5.})
25. Bg5 (25. Ng5 $1 Rf8 (25... Nxg5 $2 26. Bxg5 $18) (25... Nxd2 $2 26. Nhf7+
$18 {Xh7}) 26. Nxe4 dxe4 27. Rxe4 {with equal material but much more active
pieces.}) 25... Bf6 {A draw against a player who outrates you by 646 points --
nothing to sneeze at!} ({After} 25... Bf6 {the game might have gone} 26. c4
Bxg5 27. Nxg5 Nxg5 28. Rxe7 Nxh3+ 29. gxh3 Nf6 {and White can repeat} 30. Nf7+
Kg8 31. Nh6+ $11) 1/2-1/2

[Event "CAN-op"]
[Site "Vancouver CAN"]
[Date "1999.??.??"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Spraggett, Kevin"]
[Black "Haley, Phil"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A21"]
[WhiteElo "2521"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "51"]
[EventDate "1999.07.02"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "11"]
[EventCountry "CAN"]
[SourceTitle "CA OP"]
[Source "ade"]

1. c4 {In this game, Spraggett gives a lesson in using central breaks in the
Botvinnik System.} d6 2. Nc3 e5 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. d3 f5 6. e4 (6. e3 {
and 6.e4 are equally common, and score equally well.}) 6... Nf6 7. Nge2 c6 (
7... O-O 8. h3 c6 9. Be3 Be6 10. Qd2 fxe4 11. Nxe4 Nxe4 12. Bxe4 d5 13. cxd5
cxd5 14. Bg2 Nc6 15. O-O Qd7 16. Kh2 d4 17. Bg5 Bd5 18. Be4 Rf7 19. Kg2 Qe6 20.
Bxd5 Qxd5+ 21. f3 a5 22. h4 a4 23. Ng1 a3 24. Rfb1 Bf8 25. bxa3 Rxa3 26. Rb2 b5
27. Rab1 b4 $17 {0-1 (46) Ljubojevic,L (2610)-Kasparov,G (2780) Linares 1992})
8. O-O Be6 (8... O-O 9. exf5 Bxf5 10. d4 Nbd7 11. h3 Qc7 12. b3 Rae8 13. d5 Nc5
14. Be3 a5 15. g4 $1 Bc8 16. Qd2 {I think of this as a KID, where Black has no
pawn storm and White can play to use e4.} Rf7 17. Rad1 Bf8 18. Ng3 Kh8 19. f4
Nfd7 20. f5 $18 Nf6 21. fxg6 hxg6 22. Bxc5 dxc5 23. d6 Qd7 24. g5 Nh5 25. Rxf7
Qxf7 26. Nxh5 gxh5 27. d7 Bxd7 28. Qxd7 {1-0 (28) Spraggett,K (2530)-Baragar,F
(2285) Can. Ch, Hamilton 1994}) 9. b3 Nbd7 (9... f4 $2 10. gxf4 Nh5 11. f5 $16
(11. d4 $16)) (9... O-O 10. exf5 Bxf5) 10. exf5 $1 Bxf5 (10... gxf5 {is the
move every Russian schoolboy knows to play... though here White gets the
advantage anyway:} 11. d4 $1 O-O (11... e4 12. d5 $1 (12. f3 $5) 12... cxd5 13.
Nd4 $16) 12. Ba3 {and Black will have an accident on d6.} Ne8 13. dxe5 Nxe5 14.
Nf4 Bf7) 11. d4 $1 Qc7 12. h3 Be6 13. Ba3 a6 14. Qd2 Bf7 15. Rad1 $16 Bf8 16.
f4 $1 exd4 (16... exf4 {keeps the d6-pawn, but loses to} 17. Nxf4 O-O-O 18. d5
c5 19. Ne6 $18) 17. Qxd4 {Black collapses in the center.} c5 (17... Be7 18. Ne4
) 18. Qe3+ Be7 19. g4 Nb6 20. f5 g5 ({Allowing White to open the f-file loses
material:} 20... O-O-O 21. fxg6 Bxg6 (21... hxg6 22. g5 $18) 22. Rxf6 Bxf6 23.
Qe6+ $18) 21. Qxg5 h5 22. Qh4 $1 (22. Qf4 $2 hxg4 23. hxg4 Rh4 {unclear.}) (22. Nf4 $5
hxg4 (22... Nxg4 $2 23. Rfe1 $18) 23. Ng6 Rh5 24. Qf4 $18) 22... Nxg4 (22...
O-O-O 23. g5 $18 {White's pawns roll over Black's minors, which are all on bad
squares.}) 23. f6 $1 Nxf6 24. Rxf6 Bxf6 25. Qxf6 Rf8 26. Ne4 1-0

[Event "CAN-op"]
[Site "Edmonton CAN"]
[Date "2005.07.09"]
[Round "1.10"]
[White "Tyomkin, Dimitri"]
[Black "Haley, Phil"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B07"]
[WhiteElo "2549"]
[BlackElo "1772"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "47"]
[EventDate "2005.07.09"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "10"]
[EventCountry "CAN"]

1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 c6 {The Pribyl System, which was played a lot in the
1990s by Czech players like IM Martin Pribyl, and more recently by GM Var
Akobian.} 4. f4 Qa5 5. Bd3 (5. e5 Ne4 6. Qf3 {is White's most aggressive
response.}) 5... e5 6. Nf3 (6. fxe5 dxe5 7. dxe5 Ng4 $1 {unclear.}2) 6... Nbd7 (6...
exd4 7. Nxd4 g6 8. O-O Bg7 9. Kh1 O-O 10. f5 Nbd7 11. Qe1 Nc5 12. Qh4 Qb4 13.
Nf3 Nxd3 14. cxd3 {with good attacking chances for White. 1-0 (68) Dominguez
Perez,L (2658)-Arencibia Rodriguez,W (2530) Havana 2005}) 7. Bd2 (7. Be3 Be7 8.
Qd2 O-O 9. O-O Qc7 10. Kh1 b5 11. Rae1 Bb7 12. a3 a6 13. h3 $6 Nh5 14. Ne2 c5
$1 15. c3 f5 $1 16. d5 c4 17. Bc2 fxe4 18. Bxe4 exf4 19. Bxf4 Nc5 $17 20. Bc2
Nd3 $17 21. Bh2 (21. Bxd3 cxd3 {hangs the Ne2 or the Bf4.}) 21... Nxe1 22. Rxe1
{was not one of Topalov's legendary exchange sac wins in: Topalov,V (2645)
-Adams,M (2640) Cap d'Agde 1994 (0-1, 36).}) (7. dxe5) 7... Qc7 8. Qe2 Be7 9.
g4 $5 (9. O-O-O a6 10. g4 Nxg4 11. Rhg1 Ngf6 12. Rxg7 Nh5 13. Rxf7 $1 Nxf4 (
13... Kxf7 14. Ng5+ $18) 14. Bxf4 exf4 15. Rxe7+ $1 Kxe7 16. Qg2 Rf8 17. Qg5+
Ke8 18. e5 $1 d5 19. Bxh7 Rf7 20. e6 Rxh7 21. Qg6+ {1-0 (21) Prie,E (2460)
-Vatter,H (2310) Strasbourg 1991}) 9... exd4 (9... Nxg4 $5 10. Rg1 h5 (10...
Ndf6 $2 11. dxe5 dxe5 12. h3 Nh6 13. fxe5 $18) 11. h3 exd4 $1 12. Nxd4 Qb6 {unclear.}2
(12... Bh4+ $5)) 10. Nxd4 Nc5 11. g5 Nxd3+ 12. cxd3 Nd7 13. Nf5 Bf8 14. Rc1 $1
{Threatening Nd5 then Bc3 with a winning attack. Compare this position with
the position after 8.Qe2: Black's Nf6 and e5-pawn are gone but the rest of his
pieces are on the same squares. In contrastm White has his Rc1 on a half-open
file, his pawn on g5 cramping Black, and a Nf5.} Qd8 15. Nd1 Nb6 (15... g6 {
isn't actually threatening to take the Nf5, since White gets the piece back
along the e-file:} 16. O-O (16. Bc3 $1) 16... gxf5 17. exf5+ Qe7 18. Qf3 Rg8
19. Kh1 $1 {and there's no good defence to Re1.} (19. Re1 $2 Ne5 $1)) 16. Nde3
Be6 17. Bc3 Rg8 18. Qh5 Qd7 19. Qxh7 f6 20. Nd4 Be7 21. f5 $1 {The B runs out
of squares on the diagonal, which leaves the Rg8 undefended.} Bxa2 22. Ra1
O-O-O (22... Bf7 23. g6 $18) 23. Rxa2 fxg5 24. Ne6 1-0
merida
46
Author: John Upper
Posted: October 15, 2017, 2:17 am

The 10th Championnat international d'échecs de Varennes, Oct 6-8, 2017, will be the strongest weekend swiss in Canada this year, and may be the strongest ever: 7 GMs, 5 IMs, 8 FMs, and 1 WIM, including: 

1 GM BRUZON Lazaro CUB 2660
2 GM LENDERMAN Aleksandr USA 2591
3 GM SAMBUEV Bator CAN 2535
4 GM ORTIZ SUAREZ Isan Reynaldo CUB 2528
5 GM ALVAREZ PEDRAZA Aramis CUB 2489
6 IM HAMBLETON Aman CAN 2479
7 GM VERA  Reynald CUB 2446
8 IM RUIZ SANCHEZ Orlen CUB 2409
9 FM THAVANDIRAN Shiyam CAN 2385
10 IM HEBERT Jean CAN 2376
11 FM SAI Krishna G V IND 2369
12 GM PEREZ RODRIGUEZ Luis Manuel CUB 2368
13 FM CHIKU-RATTE Olivier-Kenta CAN 2317
14 IM PEREZ GARCIA Rodney Oscar CUB 2315
15 FM MORELLA CABRERA Julio Antonio CUB 2248

The only surprise (for me, anyway) is why this event ends Sunday, rather than add 1 or 2 more rounds on Holiday Monday.

Homepage
http://www.echecsvarennes.ca/Home.php

Crosstables and Results
http://chess-results.com/tnr306180.aspx?lan=1&art=2&rd=3&flag=30&wi=821

Live Games
http://lavariante.ca/varennes/tfd.htm

 


Our Canadian Tactic comes from the game GM Bator Sambuev - GM Louis Manuel Perez-Garcia, from the board 1 round 3 game of the still-in-progress, 2017 Varennes International.

White has just played Bb2 and now it is Black to play.

..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Verennes"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2017.10.07"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Sambuev, Bator"]
[Black "Perez-Garcia, Luis Manuel"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A22"]
[WhiteElo "2535"]
[BlackElo "2368"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "99"]

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. e3 $5 {both Nf3 and g3 are much more common, but
Carlsen has played this twice in fast games in 2017 against Anand and MVL.} d5
4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Qc2 (5. Nf3 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bd6 7. d4 Qe7 $1) 5... Nb4 6. Qb1 Bd6
(6... N8c6 7. a3 Nd5 8. Nf3 {would be a reversed Taimanov Sicilian, where
White is a tempo up.}) (6... c5 7. Nf3 N4c6 8. a3 Be7 9. Be2 O-O 10. O-O Be6
11. d3 {is a reversed Hedgehog, Wirig,A (2477)-Shirazi,K (2448) Metz 2008 (1-0,
49).}) 7. a3 N4c6 8. b4 O-O 9. Nf3 a6 10. Bc4 Bg4 11. Ne4 Bf5 12. Rg1 $5 Nd7
13. Bd3 {Controlling e4 before pushing g4.} (13. g4 $6 Bxe4 14. Qxe4 Nf6 15.
Qb1 e4 $15) 13... Bg6 14. g4 Nf6 15. h4 Bxe4 16. Bxe4 Nxe4 17. Qxe4 f6 18. Bb2
Qe7 19. h5 {[#] White has more space, but is that so important with four
minors off the board? Black's Bd6 is not very impressive, but is it worse than
the one on b2?} Qf7 20. Nh4 a5 21. b5 Nd8 22. Nf5 Ne6 23. Qc4 Nc5 24. Qxf7+
Kxf7 25. Ke2 Na4 26. Bc1 $5 {Is White being provocative? Just trying to keep
more pieces on the board? Or claiming that the Na4 is worse than the Bc1.} (26.
Bc3 $11) 26... g6 27. Ng3 Rfd8 28. Rh1 Kg7 29. Ra2 Rac8 30. Rc2 c6 31. bxc6
Rxc6 32. Rxc6 bxc6 33. Kd1 {[#]} c5 $6 (33... Nc5 $5 {trying to bring the N to
d3.} 34. hxg6 hxg6 35. Kc2 Be7) 34. hxg6 hxg6 35. Rh4 {Threatening g5,
attacking the Na4 and breaking up Black's pawns.} Nb6 36. Kc2 Be7 37. g5 f5 (
37... fxg5 38. Re4 (38. Rg4) 38... Kf6 39. Bb2 Nd7 40. Ra4 Ra8 41. Bc3 Nb6 42.
Rxa5 Rxa5 43. Bxa5 Nc4 $11) 38. Bb2 {[#]} Bxg5 $2 (38... Rd5 $1 39. f4 (39. Rh6
Bxg5 40. Nxf5+ $2 Kf6 {Only move.} $19) 39... Nc4 $1 $11 {Black's counterplay arrives
just in time.} 40. Bc3 Nxa3+ 41. Kb3 Nb1 $1 (41... c4+ $5) 42. Bxe5+ Rxe5 $1
43. fxe5 Nxd2+ 44. Kc3 Nf3 $11 {Black will win a couple of pawns, but White
should be able to force a draw.}) 39. Bxe5+ Bf6 $2 (39... Kf7 40. Rh7+ Ke6 41.
Bc7 Rd7 {Only move.} 42. Rxd7 Nxd7 43. Bxa5 $16) 40. Nxf5+ $1 $18 {All three of White's
remaining pieces are hanging, but Black -- (as Tal said) -- can take only one
at a time.} Kf7 (40... gxf5 41. Bxf6+ Kxf6 42. Rh6+ $18 {with an extra pawns
and vastly better structure.}) 41. Nh6+ Ke6 42. Bxf6 Kxf6 43. Rf4+ Ke6 44. Ng4
Nd7 45. Re4+ Kd5 46. Re7 $1 {Threatening Rxd7 then Nf6+.} Nb6 47. Re5+ Kc6 48.
Rg5 {Simplest.} (48. Re6+ Kb5 49. Nf6 $1 (49. Rxg6 $2 Nc4 $16 {Black has some
counterplay.}) 49... Nc4 50. Ne4 Nxa3+ 51. Kb3 {threatens Nc3# and taking the
Na3.}) 48... Nc4 49. Ne5+ $1 {Forcing off the Ns leaves a winning Rook ending.} Nxe5 50. Rxe5 {White has an extra pawn and all
three of Black's pawns are isolated and weak.  Sambuev leads with 3/3 but with
11 players 1/2 a point back, including GM Alex Lenderman, who has White
against Sambuev in round 4.} 1-0
merida
46

..

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: October 8, 2017, 3:23 am

Chess.Com Speed Chess Championship

 Oct. 4, 2017  (10 a.m. Pacific, 1 p.m. EST)

The last match in the first round of the Chess.Com Speed Chess Championship is:  Magnus Carlsen vs. Gadir Guseinov

Carlsen is the defending Chess.com Speed Chess Champion, and of course, the World Champion. GM Guseinov won the chess.com qualifier.

The winner plays Wesley So, who edged Anish Giri 15.5/14.5.

The format for the Chess.com matches is 3 hours of online play, broken into four formats:

  1. 90 minutes of 5+2 blitz, 
  2. 60 minutes of 3+2 blitz,
  3. 30 minutes of 1+1 bullet,
  4. one chess960 game in each time control. 

Live Games (with commentary by FM Danny Rensch and GM Eric Hansen)

https://www.chess.com/tv

http://www.twitch.tv/Chess


"Closing Gambit"

Official trailer to a 2018 documentary on the 1978 World Championship between Champion Anatoly Karpov and Viktor Korchnoi in Baguio, Philippines, featuring interviews with surviving witnesses and many of today's top GM commentators.

For those who weren't born then or don't study chess history, the match was dramatic for several reasons:

  • Politics: the Soviet Hero vs Soviet Enemy. Karpov was a Soviet hero, for having returned the World Championship title to the Soviet Union after Fischer forfieted to him in 1975, while Kortchnoi defected from the Soviet Union in 1976 and his name was no longer reported in the Soviet press and his chess events were boycotted by all Soviet players.
  • Circus: Both sides used off-board tactics to upset their opponents: protests about flags on the table, parapsychologists in the audience, reflective sunglasses, refused handshake...
  • Chess 1: Karpov and Kortchnoi were clearly the two strongest players in the world, and their positions could have been reversed if Kortchnoi had won their Candidate's Final match in 1974, after which Fischer might have forfeited the title to him
  • Chess 2: Karpov led the "first to six wins" match +5 =20 -2, before losing games 28, 29 and 31... 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P63mq4LZgUU

 


Does Chess Make a Good Public Lecture Topic?

As chess fans we're certainly biased -- we might even watch a documentary on a 40 year old match 🙂 -- but lectures aiming at the broader non-chess audience are a different matter: they typically have less hard-core chess content (which non-players couldn't follow) and try to explain how lessons from chess expertise might transfer to other domains. I haven't found any of those attempts convincing, but here are two that illustrate the genre and its limitations:

Judit Polgar

November 2016 TED Talk: "Giving checkmate is always fun!"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-ttu7dyBCU

 

Jennifer Shahade

2014 TEDx Talk: "Understanding Chess Mastery"

Makes a sensible distinction between a hackneyed question " How many moves ahead can you see?" and a possibly more insightful question "How do you know when to think so hard?"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPopQaY7Og4

 

Category:

Author: John Upper
Posted: October 4, 2017, 5:33 pm

September 29 - Oct. 1, 2017

RA Fall Open
RA Centre, Ottawa

5 round Swiss; Open, U1900, U1600
TC: 90 + 30

http://forum.chesstalk.com/showthread.php?16226-2017-RA-Fall-Open-Sept-29-Oct-1&p=117076&viewfull=1#post117076

 


 September 30 - Oct. 1, 2017

 

Edmonton Junior Regional Championship
Edmonton Chess Club 

Open: 5 round Swiss; TC: 90 + 30
U1300: 7 round Swiss; TC: G/45 + 30

http://www.albertachess.org/2017EJR.php

 

October 1, 2017

CMA Sunday Tournament
Marshall McLuhan Catholic Secondary School|Toronto

K-12 students

https://chess-math.org/pdf/toronto/tournament_01_10_2017.pdf

 

2017 Vancouver Junior Chess Championship
Oakridge Centre, Vancouver

4 sections: U5, U8, U11, U14

http://www.chess.bc.ca/events.shtml

 


 October 6-8, 2017

10th Championnat international d'échecs de Varennes

10 GMs Confirmed!
Guaranteed $16,000 Prize Fund!!

the strongest Canadian weekend tournament... ever?

5 round Swiss
TC: 40/75min + G/30 + 30s

http://www.echecsvarennes.ca/Home.php

 

October 6-9, 2017

2017 BC Closed
Accent Inn, Victoria 

8-player RR.
Invitation Only

http://victoriachessclub.pbworks.com/w/page/118874565/BC%20Closed%202017

 

October 7-9, 2017

2017 Maritime Open
Chinese Commerce Centre (Kent Theatre), St. John, NB

6 round Swiss
TC: 40/2 + G/1

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/marop17.html

 

2017 Alberta Open
Chateau Lacombe Hotel, Edmonton

$3,000 in Prizes Guaranteed
6 round Swiss
TC: 40/90 + G/30 + 30

http://www.albertachess.org/2017AO.html

 

New West Chess Open
Douglas College, New Westminster, BC

6 round Swiss; 
10am & 3pm each day

https://westchess.com/tournament/new-west-open-2017

 


 

October 14-15, 2017

31e Championnat Ouvert de Jonquière
Pavillon Saint-Philippe, Jonquière, QC

Système suisse de 4 rondes
Cad: 30c/75m + 45m/mat + 30s

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/activite/championnat-ouvert-de-jonquiere

 

2017 Aurora Fall Open
Royal Canadian Legion, Aurora, ON

Sat: 9:30; 2; 6:30. Sun: 10; 2:30

http://www.aucc.club/aurora-weekend-tournaments/2017-aurora-fall-open/2017-aurora-fall-open-details/

  


 October 20-22, 2017

Automnal 2017 de Sherbrooke
Bibliothèque Éva-Senécal, Sherbrooke, QC

Système suisse de 5 rondes
Cad: 30c/75m + 40m/mat + 30s

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/activite/automnal-2017-de-sherbrooke

 

October 21-22, 2017

Steinitz-Menchik Chess Classic
Calgary Chess Club, Calgary 

5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://calgarychess.com/WORDPRESS/?page_id=9932

 


 

 October 27-29, 2017

 

2017 Edmonton Fall Sectional
Edmonton Chess Club

6-player RRs by rating; NO BYES
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.albertachess.org/2017EFS.html

 

October 28-29, 2017

Almonte Open
Almonte, ON

no info available

https://www.eoca.ca/#/

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: September 30, 2017, 12:23 am
WYCC 
September 16-25, 2017 
Montevideo, Uruguay
The World Youth Chess Championship (WYCC) took place in Montevideo, Uruguay. For the second year, the WYCC has only the U14, U16 and U18 players, with the U8, U10 and U12 held in the World Cadet Championships, this time in Brazil from Aug. 21-31, 2017. 
16 Canadians played. Top Canadian Finishers were:
    • Svitlana Demchenko, 6th in U14G 
    • Richard Chen 7th in U16 
    • Rohan Talukdar, 12th in in U14 and 
    • Sergey Noritsyn (U14) and Jiayan Wang (U18G) both 17th. 
As a whole, the Canadian team gained 560 FIDE Elo rating points. 
Complete Canadian results, sorted by final Rank:
SNo   Name Rtg 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Pts. Rk. rtg+/- Group
12 WFM Demchenko Svitlana 1985 1 1 ½ 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 7.5 6 25.2 U14_Girls
30 CM Chen Richard 2189 1 ½ 1 0 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 7.5 7 122.8 U16_Open
21 CM Talukdar Rohan 2132 1 1 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 0 7 12 40.4 U14_Open
32   Noritsyn Sergey 2038 1 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 0 1 1 7 17 60.4 U14_Open
36   Wang Jiaying 1822 ½ 0 0 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 0 6 17 96.8 U18_Girls
34   He Emma 1664 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 6 21 64.4 U14_Girls
33   Liang Hairan 2131 1 0 1 ½ ½ 0 1 0 ½ 1 0 5.5 36 20 U16_Open
54   Feng Richard 1648 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 6 39 30.8 U14_Open
52   Li Eric M 1844 0 1 1 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 1 1 5.5 40 72 U16_Open
42   Zhu Brandon 2015 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 5 43 14.4 U18_Open
44   Zhong Joey 1984 0 1 0 ½ 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 4.5 46 -32 U18_Open
37   Gaisinsky Adam 1965 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 0 0 0 5 51 34.4 U14_Open
43   Li James 2013 ½ 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 ½ 1 0 4 51 -90.4 U18_Open
48   Liu Zhanhe 1912 0 1 1 0 ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ 0 4.5 52 28.8 U16_Open
55   Tao Ellen 1561 ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 1 0 0 3.5 57 23.6 U16_Girls
68   Makarczyk David 1385 0 0 1 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 1 5 58 48.4 U14_Open
Congratulations and thanks to the players and Team Canada team: HOD Christina Tao, and Coaches IM Nikolay Noritsyn, IM Kaiqi Yang who also passed their FIDE Trainer exams to earn the FT title! Also on hand, but too busy and too principled to do anything as an official member of Team Canada was IA Hal Bond, the WYCC Chief Arbiter. 
Thanks to Her Excellency Madame Joanne Frappier, the "Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Canada to Uruguay", who greeted Team Canada before Rd 10. 
Photos of Canadian Team (thanks to HOD Christina Tao):
https://www.facebook.com/pg/Canadianwycc2014/posts/ 
Author: John Upper
Posted: September 27, 2017, 3:47 pm

Isle of Man International
September 23 - October 1, 2017

The strongest Swiss of the year and -- with the current World Champion and his two immediate predecessors -- one of the strongest swiss tournaments ever. In addition to the World Champs, it has 67 GMs, including 13 over 2700:

Rank Name FED Rtg
       
1 Carlsen Magnus  NOR 2827
2 Kramnik Vladimir  RUS 2803
3 Caruana Fabiano  USA 2799
4 Anand Viswanathan  IND 2794
5 Nakamura Hikaru  USA 2781
6 Adams Michael  ENG 2738
7 Gelfand Boris  ISR 2737
8 Eljanov Pavel  UKR 2734
9 Vallejo Pons Francisco  ESP 2716
10 Almasi Zoltan  HUN 2707
11 Naiditsch Arkadij  AZE 2702
12 Vidit Santosh Gujrathi  IND 2702
13 Howell David W L  ENG 2701

Other Notables include a FIDE World Champion, two World Championship Challengers, and two Women's World Champions:

14 Short Nigel D  ENG 2698
17 Leko Peter  HUN 2679
18 Kasimdzhanov R  UZB 2676
22 Hou Yifan  CHN 2670
31 Shirov Alexei  LAT 2630
44 Timman Jan H  NED 2573
52 Kosteniuk A  RUS 2552

Canadians in Master Group:

  • IM Aman Hambleton
  • IM Leon Piasetski

GM Eric Hansen  was listed on the site a week ago, but is not listed there the night before. That's because he has decided to be Aman's second, to help him get his final GM Norm (and a shave).

Round 1 Novelty
Pairings for round 1 were done at random which has resulted in the #3 and #2 seeds
 Caruana - Kramnik paired against each other in round 1.

Homepage
http://iominternationalchess.com/

Live Games
http://iominternationalchess.com/live.html

https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/isle-of-man-2017/

 

Standings and Results
http://chess-results.com/tnr303618.aspx

Note: the image above is not the symbol of some cabal of James Bond villains; it's the center of the Isle of Man flag. 


 WYCC

September 16-25, 2017

The World Youth Chess Championship (WYCC) takes place in Montevideo, Uruguay. For the first year the WYCC has only the U14, U16 and U18 players, with the U8, U10 and U12 held in the World Cadet Championships.

16 Canadians are playing. After 7 rounds:

  • the top Canadian is Richard Chen with 5/7 in the U16. 
  • Next up, with 4.5/7, are: Rohan Talukdar, Sergey Noritsyn, and Adam Gaisinsky (all U14), and Svitlana Demchenko (U14G). 
  • As a whole, the Canadian team is up 133 rating points.

Full Canadian Team Stangings:
http://chess-results.com/tnr297049.aspx?lan=1&art=25&fedb=CAN&turdet=YES&flag=30&wi=821

Photos of Canadian Team (thanks to HOD Christina Tao)
https://www.facebook.com/pg/Canadianwycc2014/posts/

2017 WYCC Homepage
http://fuajedrez.org/wyccuruguay2017


2017 World Cup 
Zurabistan

Lev Aronian and Ding Liren qualifed for the Candidates by finishing atop their halves of at the World Cup. They play a four game match for bragging rights and more money. Regardless of the outcome, Ding will be the first Chinese man to qualify for the Candidates.

Anyone still interested in goings on in Zurab's fiefdom can find links elsewhere.

Author: John Upper
Posted: September 23, 2017, 4:41 am

CFC President Vlad Drkulec has sent an Open Letter to FIDE regarding the treatment of Canadian GM Anton Kovalyov at the 2017 World Cup. 

You can read it below, or download the PDF from this page: http://chess.ca/newsfeed/file/792

Note: this website does not allow us to fully reproduce the formatting of the letter, which has the picture above positioned after the second paragraph.

 


An Open Letter to FIDE, from the Chess Federation of Canada regarding the Kovalyov incident at the World Cup. 

Dear Mr. Makropoulos, 

I would like to thank you for your September 15, response to Hal Bond’s protest on behalf of Canadian 

chessplayer Anton Kovalyov on the incident at the World Cup. I would like to preface my remarks by 

saying that I respect you and all you’ve contributed to FIDE and the world of chess. I would also like to 

say that I understand that GM Zurab Azmaiparashvili has made huge contributions to chess organization 

and fundraising and I respect that as well. I am aware of an incident in a previous World Youth Chess 

Championship where he was a voice of reason and was instrumental in resolving a problematic situation 

in favour of a very young Canadian who had made an improper claim of threefold repetition. I would 

certainly not expect nor hope that this current World Cup incident will be that which the Grandmaster 

and President of the ECU will be remembered for. 

 

The comments made by the president of FIDE, Kirsan Ilyumzhinov certainly gave hope that some 

measure of justice might be hoped for in this most unfortunate situation and that FIDE recognized the 

seriousness and implications of trying to minimize what happened to Mr. Kovalyov. 

I would ask that we avoid the error of seizing upon some pretext to explain the unexplainable and the 

unconscionable act which took place. An organizer and member of the Appeals Committee intervened 

moments before a competition to distract and insult a Grandmaster who only a few moments before 

became aware that there might be a problem with the way he was dressed. 

[screencap above from YouTube video]

https://ss.sport-express.ru/userfiles/materials/108/1080297/large.jpg

 

I would like to point out this photograph dated September 7, 2017 where Zurab is himself pictured in 

shorts/capri pants at the same tournament in the presence of Magnus Carlsen. The photograph came 

from the Russian sports news site 

https://www.sport-express.ru/chess/reviews/istoriya-kovaleva-kakproigrat-turnir-zhizni-iz-za-otsutstviya-shtanov-1307659/ 

The picture appears to be a frame grab from the youtube video at the following location which shows the whole incident in context.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0iBa18sGC0 

 

Any random check of coverage on sites like Chessbase.com shows that jeans and tee shirts are worn by 

many of the other Grandmasters. One example of this is Grandmaster Aronian’s cat tee shirt, which I 

will not criticize, but which does seem to me to be no less problematic from a FIDE dress code 

perspective than Anton’s attire. If it tries to reframe this episode as a question of a dress code which is 

vaguely formulated and sporadically enforced at this tournament FIDE will make itself look ridiculous 

and hypocritical to all independent observers. If Anton saw Zurab’s shorts at that September 7 th photo 

opportunity in the presence of both the current World Champion and Georgia's former Women's World 

Champion, and remembering that there were no warnings or complaints from Arbiters before or after 

any of the previous four games when he had worn those pants at this World Cup, Anton could be 

forgiven for not anticipating that there would be a problem if he wore them again for a fifth game. 

The future for chess in Canada appeared quite bright based on the performance of Anton up until the 

moment when Anton was inhospitably abused over his attire. If the Chess Federation of Canada which 

has been a good citizen of FIDE since the day of its founding can expect this kind of treatment within 

FIDE for one of its top players, in his shining moment, the brightest moment of his chess career, with the 

world spotlight upon him, who is then safe? I am certain I don’t need to point out that this has brought 

a great deal of unfavourable attention to chess and FIDE in the worldwide press coverage. Please do not 

stoop to explanations which attempt to justify the unjustifiable. We can accept the idea that there can 

be a dress code for chess competition. Given everything that has gone on before and during this World 

Cup, we cannot accept that a young Grandmaster deserves to be distracted and insulted moments 

before a game that is part of the qualification for the World Chess Championship, merely because the 

organizer doesn't like his pants. 

 

If there is to be a dress policy it needs to be clearly enunciated before the tournament and should be 

enforced for all participants. If chess is going to make inroads in the demographic groups which 

advertisers crave we must avoid the appearance of ridiculousness which this situation invokes. It is a 

pity that instead of focusing on the chess that was played we are focusing on a pair of shorts. 

I think that a sincere apology to grandmaster Kovalyov from grandmaster Azmaiparashvili for this 

incident without qualification or blaming the victim of this outburst would be the first step required to 

move forward from this unfortunate situation. As Hal Bond said in his letter about this incident “Mr 

Azmaiparashvili's behaviour in this case clearly violated the rules and norms of FIDE.” Please do not 

send the message to the world at large that this is not the case and this behaviour is within the rules and 

norms of FIDE. 

 

Respectfully, 

[signed]

Vladimir Drkulec 

President, Chess Federation of Canada 

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: September 18, 2017, 4:51 am