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Canadian Chess Newsfeed

The 2019 Canadian University Chess Championship took place January 12-13 at McMaster in Hamilton, ON.

The top section was a 6-team RR which ended in a tie for first between Western and the University of Toronto 'A', who won based on their superior result against the third-place team, the University of Ottawa.

Team Rd.1 Rd.2 Rd.3 Rd.4 Rd.5 Total
U of T  'A' W5 W3 D2 D4 W6 4
Western W4 W5 D1 W6 D3 4
Ottawa W6 L1 W4 W5 D2 3.5
Waterloo L2 W6 L3 D1 W5 2.5
McGill L1 L2 D6 L3 L4 0.5
U of T 'B' L3 L4 D5 L2 L1 0.5

 

The Reserve section was won by Queen's (5/5), followed by Ryerson (4), and Western 'B' (3.5/5).  

As at previous CUCC events, no teams west of Ontario or east of Quebec managed the logistics and expense of attending the two-day competition.


 

Links

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: January 17, 2019, 12:03 am

2019 TATA Steel

The 81st annual tournament at Wijk aan Zee runs January 12-27, 2019. The top section is a 14-player RR featuring six of the world's top eight players, including World Champion Magnus Carlsen.

Rank Name FIDE NAT World
1 Carlsen, Magnus 2835 NOR 1
2 Mamedyarov, Shak 2817 AZR 3
3 Ding, Liren 2813 CHN 4
4 Giri, Anish 2783 NED 5
5 Kramnik, Vladimir 2777 RUS 7
6 Anand, Viswanathan 2773 IND 8
7 Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2763 RUS 13
8 Radjabov, Teimour 2757 AZR 14
9 Duda, Jan-Krzysztof 2738 POL 19
10 Rapport, Richard 2731 HUN 23
11 Shankland, Samuel 2725 USA 27
12 Fedoseev, Vladimir 2724 RUS 28
13 Vidit, Gujrathi 2695 IND 45
14 Van Foreest, Jorden 2612 NED 192

Notes:

  • Carlsen has the record of 6 tournament wins in Wijk
  • Anand has won 5 of the 18 times he has played in the Wijk tournament.
  • van Foreest qualified by winning the 2018 Challengers group.

 

The Challengers group is also a 14-player RR, with the winner qualifying for the 2020 Masters. Canadian Evgeny Bareev comes out of his semi-retirement to play for the fifth time in Wijk; he won the main event in 2002 (ahead of Grischuk, Adams, Morozevich, Leko, etc.) 

Update: In round 1, Bareev won on the Black side of the French against the third youngest GM in chess history: 13-year-old Indian GM Rameshbabu Praggnanandhaa.


Links

Live Games with Commentary

There are several options for watching live games with GM commentary:

  • IMs Anna Rudolf & Lawrence Trent are the hosts on the official site and on the chess.com twitch feed. They're onsite, with video and player interviews.
  • The Chessbrahs do live commentary on their twitch stream; GM Aman Hambleton and Eric Kurtz hosted for round 1
  • GMs Peter Svidler & Jan Gustafsson do commentary on chess24, but only for premium members.

 

photo from official site: Wijk aan Zee on a rare non-rainy and relatively wind-free day.

 

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: January 12, 2019, 5:54 pm

December 24, 2018 marks the 150th anniversary of World Champion Emanuel Lasker's birth. 

Lasker won the World Championship by defeating Wilhelm Steinitz in an 1894 match held in New York City, Philadelphia, and -- for games 12-19 -- Montreal.

Here is the final game of that match, along with fragments from other games from the match, and comments from both Lasker and Steinitz. 

photo: Steinitz vs Lasker in Montreal, in what appears to be a position from late in game 15.

 

..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "5th World Championship"]
[Site "Montreal"]
[Date "1894.05.26"]
[Round "19"]
[White "Lasker, Emanuel"]
[Black "Steinitz, William"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D40"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "103"]
[EventDate "1894.03.15"]
[EventType "match"]
[EventRounds "19"]
[EventCountry "CAN"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceVersion "2"]
[SourceVersionDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceQuality "1"]

{Before the match, Steinitz said, "I believe that Lasker is a really fine
player. Moreover, the latter had the chance to study all my games, my books
and therefore my style and if I do lose he will have to beat me with my own
weapons…” (NYT, March 11, 1894). One of Steinitz's weapons was the Bishop
pair, and Lasker showed he had learned well...} 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4.
Nf3 Be7 5. e3 O-O 6. Bd3 c5 {[#]} 7. dxc5 {Like Kramnik over 100 years later,
Lasker believed that a good way to defeat the World Champion was to go for
queenless middlegames. But he had already proved he could beat Steinitz in a
more complex middlegame:} ({Game 15 of the match continued:} 7. O-O cxd4 8.
exd4 dxc4 9. Bxc4 Nbd7 10. Bb3 Nb6 11. Bg5 $14 {and Lasker went on to win this
IQP middlegame; 1-0 (44) Lasker,E-Steinitz, WC m g15, Montreal 1894}) 7... dxc4
8. Bxc4 Qxd1+ 9. Kxd1 {[#]} Nc6 $6 {Steinitz had already played this in game
11 of the match; he lost that game, but had found an improvement at move 11.
"Already inaccurate. The most comfortable development for Black involves
fianchettoing his queen's bishop, so Black's knight will belong on the
d7-square." - Schuyler, "Your Opponent is Overrated".} ({Here's how Black
should develop:} 9... Bxc5 10. Ke2 a6 11. Bd3 Be7 12. Rd1 b5 13. a3 Bb7 14. b4
Nbd7 15. Bd2 ({On} 15. Bb2 {Black will maneuver a N to c4, more-or-less
forcing White to concede the B-pair with Bxc4.}) 15... Rac8 16. Rdc1 Rfd8 17.
Be1 Nb6 18. e4 Nc4 (18... Nh5 19. g3 (19. Bd2 Bf6 20. g4 $2 {traps the N, but
loses to} Bxc3 $19 {when ...Bxa1 or ...Nf4 will win.}) 19... f5 $1 $17) 19.
Bxc4 bxc4 20. Nd2 Nd7 21. Rc2 Ne5 22. f3 f5 23. Bf2 Bf6 24. Rb1 Rd3 25. Na4 c3
26. Nb3 fxe4 27. fxe4 Bxe4 28. Nbc5 Bg6 29. Re1 Rd2+ 30. Rxd2 Bh5+ 31. Ke3 Ng4+
32. Kf4 cxd2 33. Rd1 g5+ {0-1 (33) Bogdanovich,S (2567)-Korobov,A (2715) Kiev
2013}) 10. a3 Bxc5 11. b4 {[#]} Rd8+ {Improving over game 11.} (11... Bb6 $6
12. Ke2 Bd7 13. Bb3 Rac8 14. Bb2 a5 $2 15. b5 $16 Ne7 16. Ne5 Be8 {Black 
(temporarily) keeps the Bs, only to give one back to reconnect his Rs.} 17. a4
Bc7 18. Nc4 Bd7 19. Rac1 Ned5 20. Nxd5 Nxd5 21. Ne5 Bxe5 (21... Be8 $2 22. Nd3
$1 f5 23. Ba3 $18) 22. Bxe5 f6 23. e4 $1 {Giving up the Bishop pair for a
structural advantage.} fxe5 24. exd5 Kf7 25. Rhd1 (25. d6 $1 Rxc1 26. Rxc1 Rc8
27. Rxc8 Bxc8 28. Ke3 {and the tactics work for White in this B ending; e.g.}
b6 29. Bc2 Bb7 30. Bxh7 Bxg2 31. Bg8+ $1) 25... Ke7 26. d6+ Kf6 27. Ke3 Rxc1
28. Rxc1 Rc8 29. Rxc8 Bxc8 30. Bc2 Kf7 31. Bxh7 g6 32. Ke4 Kf6 (32... Kg7 33.
Kxe5 Kxh7 34. Kf6 $18 {the d-pawn will cost Black his B, and Black has no way
to use the intervening moves.}) 33. g4 g5 34. Kf3 Kf7 35. Be4 Ke8 36. h4 Kd7
37. h5 Ke8 38. Ke3 {1-0 (38) Lasker,E-Steinitz,W g11, Philadelphia, 1894}) 12.
Ke2 Bf8 13. Bb2 $11 Bd7 $6 {"Even with the c6-knight misplaced, it is still
better to fianchetto this bishop after ...b7-b6, or ...a7-a6 and ...b7-b5.
Where it stands, the bishop is both an obstruction and a target, just as in 
[game 11]." - Schuyler, "Your Opponent is Overrated".} 14. Rhd1 Rac8 15. Bb3
Ne7 16. Nd4 (16. Ne5 Be8 $14 {White should be able to get his minors to better
squares faster than Black after the impending exchange of Rs.}) 16... Ng6 17.
Rd2 {[#]} e5 $6 {Another small mistake. Dislodging the N and clearing a
diagonal for the Bd7 seems perfectly sensible, but the pawn becomes exposed on
e5, and defending it ties up Black's minors.} (17... Ne5 18. Rad1 Be7 (18...
Nc4 $6 19. Bxc4 Rxc4 20. Nf3 Rc7 21. Ne5 Be7 $14) 19. Ndb5 Ne4 $17 {according
to Steinitz, though it's hard to see any advantage for Black after} 20. Rd4)
18. Nf3 Bg4 (18... Bc6 19. Rad1 Rxd2+ 20. Rxd2 Be7 21. Bc2 Re8) 19. Rxd8 $1
Rxd8 20. h3 $1 Bxf3+ {Black gives up the B pair, and is left with light square
weaknesses.} (20... Bc8 $5 21. Ng5 Nh8 22. Nb1 {with better Bs and pressure on
e5.}) 21. gxf3 (21. Kxf3 $2 Rd2 {with the initiative.}) 21... Be7 22. Rc1 Kf8
23. Na4 $5 {[#] For me, this is the most interesting move of the middlegame:
it semi-threatens both Rc7 and Nc5, neither of which is winning, and both of
which can be stopped by Black's next move, which White of course saw. So why
play Na4? Partly, it may just be "maneuvering"... keeping the game going and
forcing the opponent to discern the threats from the non-threats and respond
accordingly. Partly, it is a way to encourage Black's pawns to move -- this
reduces their future mobility and weakens some squares (the pawns can't go
back) and so makes other maneuvers possible while limiting Black's defensive
options.} b6 24. Nc3 Bd6 25. Rd1 {Tying Black further.} Ne8 (25... Ke7 $2 26.
Nb5 Bb8 27. Rxd8 Kxd8 28. Bxf7 $18) (25... Bc7 26. Rxd8+ Bxd8 27. Nb5 a6 28.
Nd6 {wins f7 or e5.}) 26. Nb5 Rd7 $6 27. Bc2 $1 Ke7 28. Bf5 $18 {White wins
the a-pawn or (as Black prefers) the exchange.} a6 (28... Rb7 29. Be4 ({or} 29.
Bc8 Rb8 30. Nxa7 Ra8 31. Nc6+ $18) 29... Rd7 30. Bc6 $18) 29. Bxd7 Kxd7 30. Nc3
f5 31. b5 $1 axb5 (31... a5 32. Nd5 $18 {wins the b6-pawn.}) 32. Nxb5 Ke6 (
32... Kc6 33. Nxd6 ({or} 33. a4 {, but exchanging on d6 leaves the c-file open
for White's R.}) 33... Nxd6 34. Rc1+ Kd7 35. a4 $18) 33. Bc3 Ne7 34. Nxd6 Nxd6
35. Bb4 Nd5 36. Rc1 (36. Bxd6 $4 Nc3+ $14) 36... Nf7 (36... Nxb4 37. axb4 b5
38. Rc7 $18) 37. Bd2 Nd6 38. Kd3 Kd7 39. e4 $1 Nf6 40. Be3 fxe4+ 41. fxe4 b5 (
41... Ndxe4 42. Bxb6 $18) 42. f3 Nc4 43. Rc3 (43. Rxc4 {also wins, but
Lasker's regrouping is much faster.}) 43... Ne8 44. Bc1 {Dominating the Nc4
and freeing the R.} Ncd6 45. Rc5 Nc7 (45... Ke6 46. Bb2 Nc4 47. Rxb5 $18) 46.
Rxe5 Ne6 47. Rh5 h6 48. Re5 g5 49. h4 gxh4 50. Rh5 Kc6 51. Rxh6 Nc5+ 52. Kc2 {
This win ended the match +10 = 4 -5, making Lasker the new World Champion. 
"When Steinitz entered this contest he felt sure of victory. But when fate
went against him and he found himself, for the first time in his life, beaten,
he behaved with the utmost chivalry. His way of resigning the last game of the
match was to call for cheers for the new champion of the world.”  - Lasker,
Lasker's Chess Magazine, 1906.} 1-0
merida
46

..

Category:

Author: John Upper
Posted: December 25, 2018, 9:04 pm

Chessbase has posted a report by WIM Agnieszka Matras-Clement on the 2018 Banff Open, with pictures, a game annotated by tournament winner Mark Ginsburg, and even Canadian chess personality bobbleheads...! Read it here.

 

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: December 23, 2018, 4:58 pm

The RA Winter Open ran December 7-9, 2018. For the first time in living memory, GM Bator Sambuev did not win the weekend tournament in Ottawa! The three-time and current Canadian Champion was held to draws by juniors Olivier-Kenta Chiku-Ratte in round 3 and Svitlana Demchenko in round 5 to finish with 4/5. Kenta defeated Shawn Rodrigue-Lemieux in round 5 to finish with 4.5/5 and clear first place, worth $350... and Big Bragging Rights. GM Sambuev was second and Demchenko was third. 

Other Winners:

  • U1900 - Dan Kearnan (4/5) 
  • U1600 - Michael Shi (4/5)

 

photos on the CFC Newsletter facebook page:


Our Canadian Game of the Week is the final round board 1 game between Canada's new #1 CFC-rated woman, Svitlana Demchenko, and the current Canadian Champion GM Bator Sambuev. Going into the round, Sambuev was tied for 1st with Olivier-Kenta Chiku-Ratte, and knew he needed to beat his 15-year-old opponent to win the tournament. He played a Dragadorf Sicilian, and the game was very interesting...

..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "RA December Open"]
[Site "Ottawa "]
[Date "2018.12.09"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Demchenko, Svitlana"]
[Black "Sambuev, Bator"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B75"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "111"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. f3 a6 {
[#]The "Dragadorf", a hybrid Dragon-on-the-kingside and
Najdorf-on-the-queenside. It started to become very popular in the late 1990s,
but was played in 1957 by Reshevsky (with ...b5 and ...h5) and three times by
Botvinnink in the early 1960s.} 8. Qd2 {The most popular move.} ({Here's a
classic game in the Dragadorf that started with White's second most popular
move:} 8. Bc4 b5 9. Bb3 Bb7 10. Qd2 Nbd7 11. O-O-O (11. Bh6 $5 Bxh6 12. Qxh6
Nc5 13. O-O-O Nxb3+ 14. cxb3 $1 $14) 11... Nc5 12. Kb1 Nxb3 13. cxb3 $5 {
Top players invariably capture this way, but maybe it's not clear just why. 
About a similar position against Larsen, Fischer wrote, "Black cannot make any
attacking headway against this particular Pawn configuration. White is lost in
the King and Pawn ending, it's true, but Black usually gets mated long before
then. As Tarrasch put it: "Before the endgame the gods have placed the middle
game."" - Fischer, M60MG, g.2. I thought Fischer's idea is that this
recapture makes it nearly impossible for Black to attack on the a and b-files,
but in his recent book about Botvinnik, Lakdawala writes that the open c-file
helps White defend against an attack on his King by exchanges. But if Fischer
is right, wouldn't those trades just lead to a losing endgame? I'm sure
Fischer was the better player, but Lakdawala was writing with 50+ years of
practice since Fischer wrote M60MG.} O-O 14. Bh6 (14. b4 a5 $1 $132) 14... Bxh6
15. Qxh6 {[#]} b4 $1 16. e5 $6 (16. Nd5 $142 $1 Bxd5 17. exd5 Qd7 {guarding f5.
} (17... Nxd5 18. Nf5 $1 {with an attack.}) 18. h4 (18. g4 Nxd5 19. Nf5 gxf5
20. gxf5) 18... Nxd5 19. h5 Nf6 20. g4 {gives White an attack for the pawn,
but Black may be able to hang on to the extra material. An interesting battle
lies ahead. - Simon Williams "The New Sicilian Dragon".}) 16... Nd7 $1 (16...
bxc3 $2 17. exf6 exf6 18. bxc3 $16) (16... dxe5 $2 17. Nf5 gxf5 18. Rxd8 $16)
17. h4 $2 (17. exd6 e5 $1 $19) (17. Ne4 Bxe4+ {only move.} 18. fxe4 Nxe5 $17) 17... bxc3
18. h5 dxe5 $1 (18... c2+ 19. Nxc2 g5 20. Qxg5+ Kh8 21. exd6 $44) 19. hxg6 Nf6
20. bxc3 (20. Nf5 c2+ {only move.} 21. Kxc2 Qc8+ {only move.} $19) 20... exd4 21. gxh7+ Kh8 22.
Rxd4 Qa5 $19 {0-1 (28) Littlewood,J-Botvinnik,M Hastings 1961}) 8... b5 {
Most annotators say Black should wait for 000 before playing ...b5, as
otherwise White can castle short and get queenside play with a4.} 9. O-O-O (9.
a4 b4 10. Nd5 (10. Na2 $5 a5 11. c3 (11. Bb5+ $5)) 10... Nxd5 11. exd5 Bb7 12.
Bc4 Nd7 13. a5 Nf6 $6 (13... Qc7 $14) 14. Ne2 (14. Qxb4 Bxd5 15. Bxa6 $16)
14... O-O 15. Ra4 Rc8 16. b3 (16. Bb6 $1) 16... Rc5 17. Rxb4 Rxd5 $6 18. Bxd5
Bxd5 19. Rb6 Qc8 20. O-O Bb7 21. c4 Nd7 22. Rc1 (22. Rb4 $1 $16) 22... Nxb6 23.
axb6 h5 {Kramnik,V (2808)-Nakamura,H (2785) Stavanger blitz 2017 ½-½ (61)})
9... Bb7 (9... h5 $5 {discouraging g2-g4, but falling provocatively far behind
in development.} 10. Nd5 Bb7 11. Nxf6+ Bxf6 12. Bg5 (12. Kb1 Nd7 13. c4 $13 {
1-0 (36) Najer,E (2669)-Shabalov,A (2569) Philadelphia 2009}) 12... Bxg5 13.
Qxg5 e5 14. Qxd8+ Kxd8 15. Nb3 Ke7 16. Na5 Ra7 {1/2-1/2 (49) Balogh,C (2660)
-Belezky,A (2451) Germany 2014}) 10. g4 h5 11. g5 Nfd7 12. Kb1 O-O 13. Bd3 $6 {
White should leave the Bf1 where it is until it's clear where it belongs --
BxNc4, Bh3, and Bd3 are all still options.} (13. f4 $5 $13 {or Rg1 preparing
f4-f5 are both better.} e5) (13. Bg2 Nb6 14. a3 $2 Nc4 15. Qd3 Nxe3 16. Qxe3
Nd7 (16... b4 $1 17. axb4 Nc6 $1 18. Nxc6 Bxc6 19. Nd5 Rb8 $19) 17. f4 e5 $1
18. Nf3 exf4 19. Qxf4 Ne5 $17 {0-1 (48) Griffiths,R (2104)-Jones,G (2509)
Bunratty 2007}) 13... Nc5 14. Rhe1 Nbd7 15. f4 b4 16. Nd5 e6 $17 17. Nf6+ {
[#] A critical position White would get a better attack if her Re1 was on g1,
but she still gets a dangerous attack here.} Bxf6 $2 (17... Kh8 $2 18. Nxh5 $1
gxh5 19. Qe2 {and White has Qxh5, Rg1 and g6.}) (17... Nxf6 {only move.} 18. gxf6 Qxf6 (
18... Bxf6 19. f5 {with an attack for the pawn.}) 19. f5 Qe5 (19... exf5 20.
exf5 Nxd3 21. Qxd3 Rae8 $17 {Lc)}) 20. fxg6 fxg6 $19) 18. gxf6 Bxe4 $2 (18...
Nxf6 $1 19. f5 $1 Nfxe4 (19... e5 20. Nb3 Ncxe4 21. Qxb4 $16) 20. Qxb4 exf5 21.
Nxf5 {only move.} Rb8 (21... gxf5 22. Bxe4 $1 Bxe4 (22... Nxe4 23. Qxb7 $18) 23. Bxc5
dxc5 24. Qc3 $18) 22. Qa3 $13) 19. Bxe4 (19. Nxe6 $1 fxe6 20. Bxc5 Nxc5 21.
Bxe4 Nxe4 22. Rxe4 $16 {Lc0}) 19... Nxe4 20. Qg2 $1 {[#]} Nexf6 $6 (20... Ndc5
21. Nxe6 Nxe6 22. Qxe4 Qxf6 23. Rxd6 $16) (20... Ndxf6 $2 21. Nxe6 fxe6 22.
Qxg6+ {is worse than the game, since the Ne4 will be hanging.}) 21. Nxe6 $1 $18
fxe6 22. Qxg6+ Kh8 23. Bd4 $5 (23. Qh6+ $1 Nh7 24. Bd4+ Rf6 (24... Ndf6 25.
Rxe6 $18) (24... e5 25. fxe5 dxe5 26. Bxe5+ $18) 25. Rxe6 $18) (23. Rxd6 $1 Qe8
(23... Qe7 24. Bd4 $18) 24. Qh6+ Nh7 25. Rxe6 $18) 23... e5 (23... Qe7 24. Rxe6
{only move.} $18 Qg7 (24... Qxe6 25. Qxh5+ $18 {and Rg1}) 25. Qg5 Rf7 26. Rxd6 $18) 24.
fxe5 dxe5 25. Bxe5 Nxe5 $1 26. Qh6+ Nh7 27. Rxd8 Raxd8 {[#]} 28. Qxh5 {Wins a
pawn, but leaves the R defending the back rank. Instead, moving the a-pawn
activates the R -- threatening RxN and Re7 -- and still leaves the h-pawn
hanging.} (28. a3 $1 Ng4 29. Qxh5 Ngf6 30. Qa5 bxa3 31. Qxa3 $18) (28. a4 $1
Rf6 (28... bxa3 $2 29. Rxe5 $18) 29. Qxh5 Nc6 30. Rg1 $18 {Black will have to
trade a R to get his K and Nh7 into the game, and the R exchange will probably
make it impossible to hold the queenside pawns.}) 28... Nf3 $1 {This wouldn't
be possible if the a-pawn had moved, since Re7 would win immediately.} 29. Rc1
Rf6 30. b3 Rd4 31. Qe8+ $2 (31. c4 $142 $1 bxc3 32. Rxc3 Rdf4 33. a4 {White is
clearly still playing for the win. Computers rate this as +2, but it's not as
easy at that makes it seem: Black has more pieces and none of them are
vulnerable to capture, though the exposed K will always allow White some free
tempi. My hunch is that advancing White's queenside pawns will eventually cost
Black a piece, though that might still not be enough to win.}) 31... Kg7 32.
Qe7+ Rf7 {[#]} 33. Qe6 $2 ({White misses her last real chance.} 33. Rg1+ $3 {
forces a R trade. That means neither side will get any serious threats against
the opponent's K, and that Black will have a harder time defending his
queenside pawns.} Nxg1 (33... Nhg5 $4 34. Rxg5+ Nxg5 35. Qe5+ $18) 34. Qe5+ Rf6
35. Qxd4 Nf3 36. Qg4+ Kf7 (36... Kh6 37. Qxb4 $18) 37. h4 $18 a5 38. Qh5+ $18)
33... Rf6 34. Qe7+ Kg6 35. Kb2 Nhg5 36. Qe8+ Kg7 37. Qe7+ Rf7 38. Qc5 Ne4 {[#]}
39. Qb6 (39. Rg1+ {only move.} $18 Kh6 (39... Neg5 40. Rxg5+ $18) 40. Qc8 $1 Neg5 $1 (
40... Nxg1 $2 41. Qh8+ $18) (40... Nc3 $4 41. Qe6+) 41. Qxa6+ Kh5 42. Rg2 {
compared to the game, White has won a pawn and put the black K in a worse spot.
}) 39... Rf6 40. Qb7+ Kg6 41. Rf1 Neg5 42. Rf2 Re4 43. Rg2 Rfe6 44. Qa8 Kf5 45.
Qf8+ Rf6 46. Qc8+ Rfe6 47. Qf8+ Ke5 48. Qc5+ Kf6 49. Qf8+ Nf7 50. Rf2 Rf4 51.
Qa8 N7e5 52. Qf8+ Nf7 53. Qa8 N7e5 54. Qf8+ (54. a3 $5 bxa3+ 55. Kxa3 {and
White is still playing for a win (but don't ask me how).}) 54... Nf7 55. Qa8
N7e5 56. Qf8+ 1/2-1/2
merida
46

..

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: December 18, 2018, 12:32 am

17 tournaments across Canada in December 2018 and January 2019.
Last chances to end the year right... and first chances to begin the New Year right.

 


Date Event Location Details Link
Nov. 30 - Dec 2 NB Closed & Saint John Open Chinese Community Centre, Saint John, NB 5 round Swiss; TC: 40/100 + G/30+30 http://mcc.cdevastation.com/nbcl18.html
         
December 2018        
December_1 Mississauga Open 2018 Tomken Twin Arena, Mississauga, ON 4 round Swiss; 50m + 10 http://miltonchess.ca/images/gord/misschippawa2018v3.pdf
Decembre_1 Tournoi Ouvert de Chambly Chambly QC 5 ronde suisse; 25 + 5 http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/regions/clubs/tournoi.php?club=74&id=13700
December_1 Brandon Chess Tournament Brandon University, MB 5 round Swiss https://chess.chessmanitoba.org/
December_2 Chippawa Open 2018 Niagara Falls Fire Hall #4, Niagara Falls, ON 5 round Swiss;TC: 30 + 5 http://miltonchess.ca/images/gord/misschippawa2018v3.pdf
         
December 7-9 RA December Open RA Cenre, Ottawa 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 http://www.chesscanada.info/forum/showthread.php?4926-2018-RA-December-Open-December-7-8-9&p=29789#post29789
December 8th Ontario Chess Challenge Qualifier 1   5 round Swiss https://senecahillchess.com/tournaments/cfc-junior-grand-prix/
         
December 14-16 Hart House Holiday Open Toronto, ON 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 https://harthousechess.com/2017/11/01/hart-house-holidays-open/
December 15-16 WBX Tournament Edmonton CC 5 round 3-player Team Tournament http://www.albertachess.org/2018WBX.php
         
Decembre 26-30 Père Noël Centre communautaire St-Henri, Montréal 5 round Swiss; TC: 30/75 + 30m/mat + 30s http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/regions/clubs/tournoi.php?club=&id=13660
         
2019        
January        
January 4-6, 2019 Scheinich Memorial Calgary Chess Club    
         
January 12-13, 2019 Ontario Junior Sandman Hotel, Misssissauga 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 https://elevatemychess.com/ontario-junior/
         
January 17th Charity Simul for Syrian Family RA Centre, Ottawa vs GM Bator Sambuev  
January 18-20 RA Winter Open RA Centre, Ottawa 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 https://eoca.ca/#/
January 18-20 Victoria Open Comfort Inn and Suites, Victoria BC 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 http://victoriachessclub.pbworks.com/w/page/100118877/Victoria%20Open
January 19th UPEI Winter Quick UPEI Charlottetown 5 round Swiss; TC: 25+5 delay http://mcc.cdevastation.com/upeiwqck19.html
January 20th PEI Closed UPEI Charlottetown 5 round Swiss; TC: 25 + 15 sec delay http://mcc.cdevastation.com/peicl19.html
         
January 25-27 Oakville Winter Open Holiday Inn, Oakville ON 5 round Swiss; TC: 90+30 https://elevatemychess.com/oakvillewinter/

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: December 1, 2018, 9:17 pm

Stockfish 10

Stockfish is now 10 years old! The open-source engine has been the world's strongest chess entity* for more than 5 years and continues to win every computer competition it enters. With contributors from all around the world, and a well-developed testing framework, Stockfish improves continuously and development versions appear almost daily. Once a year they commit to a new version name, and on November 29 they released Stockfish 10, so now is a good time to update.

The Stockfish team release compiles for different OS's -- PC, Linux, Mac, Android -- but also release different versions for PC which perform differently on various hardware. Intel i7 users should get the ones with the BMI2 instructions, while AMD users should stick with the POPCNT versions; YMMV, but you can always test each one on your own by using the -bench parameter.

*not counting the (mostly?) unavailable AlphaZero, see below.


AlphaZero Returns... sort of

AlphaZero is (probably) the strongest chess entity of all time. But it is also a science and PR project which is not available to the public. Last year the AlphaZero developers released a paper about it, along with 10 amazing games it played against Stockfish 8... and then it disappeared.

But during the Carlsen - Caruana World Championship match Demis Hassabis, head of Google DeepMind and the AlphaZero project, dropped in to watch and was interviewed at the start of game 8. You can watch the interview, but the tempting bits were, "we are going to release more games", and, "I think people are going to find some of these newer games, with an even stronger version of AlphaZero, quite fascinating, I hope." The latter suggests that DeepMind have done further training on AZ!?

We now know that the games they intend to release will be part of a book "Game Changer" by GM Matthew Sadler and WIM Natasha Regan, who previously collaborated on "Chess for Life". DeepMind has been letting Sadler use AZ to analyze chess, and Sadler has posted videos summarizing what he has discovered about the Carlsen-Caruana match games. It's not quite as interesting as you might hope, but it's hard to do better for a review of the match than a very strong GM using the world's strongest and most exclusive chess engine. You can find Sadler's videos here:

If you want more computer insight into the Carlsen - Caruana match, especially the amazing endgame in game 6 -- where Carlsen created a piece-down fortress which could have been broken, but not by any human -- see Ken Reagan's blog post.


Chess.Com Speed Chess Championship 2018: Semis and Final

The Semifinals and Final of the 2018 Chess.Com Speed Chess Championship take place November 30-December 2, 2018. The semis feature:

  1. GMs Wesley So vs Jan-Krzysztof Duda (Nov 30; 1pm EST)
  2. GMs Hikaru Nakamura vs Levon Aronian (Dec. 1; 1pm EST)

the winners meet in the Final Sunday, December 2, at 3pm EST.

Duda is a rating underdog vs So, but has already eliminated favourites Karjakin and Grischuk. Naka is the clear favourite to win it all. 

The format for the Chess.com matches is 3 hours of online play, broken into three formats:

    • 90 minutes of 5+2 blitz, 
    • 60 minutes of 3+2 blitz,
    • 30 minutes of 1+1 bullet

Live Games (with IM Daniel Rensch and GM Robert Hess)


"Computer games are boring" ??

... is what people who don't look at computer games (used to?) say.

Here's a bonus game: Stockfish 10 vs Leela in a fascinating King's Indian where Leela does what other engines do not: play ...g4-g3 and sac LOTS of material for an uncalculatable attack. Both sides find amazing resources.

Nerd Info: 

  • White: Stockfish 10
  • Black: Leela Chess Zero (0.19.0, network 31682)
  •  TC: 2 + 2
  • OB: Nunn Test Suite
  • Hardware: AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X 16-Core Processor 3394 MHz.
    • SF was using 16 cores; Leela was using twin 1080Ti's. 
    • Speed:
      • W=34.4 plies; 24,296kN/s 
      • B=13.6 plies; 167kN/s 

Note: this last number was reported by the Fritz GUI, but it is clearly incorrect: on this hardware Lc0 runs closer to 8kN/s and maxes out in simple positions around 45kN/s. This lower node count is typical for neural net programs, which have much larger (and so slower) evaluation functions than the A-B engines we're all used to.

I have added a few notes, and a couple of similar games, but most of the notes are directly from the engines. The numbers following the moves indicate: the evaluation of the engine which played that move/ply depth; the number of seconds spent on that move; the best move according to the other engine (if different from the move played). This gets particulary interesting around move 30, when the engine evaluations deviate wildly.

..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Blitz 2m+2s"]
[Site "Alienware"]
[Date "2018.11.29"]
[Round "16"]
[White "Stockfish 10 64 POPCNT"]
[Black "Lc0 v0.19.0"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E98"]
[Annotator "SF10, Lc0; JKU"]
[PlyCount "185"]
[TimeControl "120+2"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Be2 O-O 6. Nf3 e5 7. O-O Nc6 8. d5
Ne7 9. Ne1 Ne8 {Left on their own, both Leela and Stockfish prefer ...
Nd7, which is by far the most popular move among top players today, but they
were both following the Nunn Opening Test Suite up to White's next move.} 10.
Be3 {Both last book move} f5 {0.56/8 4} 11. f3 {1.27/26 10} f4 {0.54/10 3 (b6)}
({In the game with colours reversed, SF played} 11... h6 12. a4 {and Black
defended on the queenside and manged to draw.}) 12. Bf2 {1.22/22 2} g5 {
0.53/11 4 (c5)} 13. Nd3 {1.20/24 7 (a4)} ({Dr. GM John Nunn is the author of
this test suite, and still chooses this line of the KID in his own games:} 13.
c5 Rf6 (13... h5 14. a4 Rf6 15. a5 Rg6 16. Nb5 a6 17. cxd6 Nxd6 18. Nxd6 cxd6
19. Bb6 Qe8 20. Rc1 g4 21. Kh1 g3 22. Rc7 gxh2 23. Rf2 Bf6 24. Bf1 h4 25. Rfc2
Rg7 26. Qc1 $14 {1-0 (91) Ragger,M (2687)-Andriasian,Z (2594) Minsk 2015}) 14.
Rc1 Rg6 15. Nb5 a6 16. cxd6 cxd6 17. Nc7 Nxc7 18. Bb6 Bd7 19. Bxc7 Qe8 20. Nd3
h5 21. Nf2 Nc8 22. b3 Bf6 23. h3 {White is ideally prepared against ...g4.
Black's N should be on h6.} Rg7 24. Qd2 Bd8 25. Rc2 Bb5 26. Bxb5 axb5 27. Rfc1
Bxc7 28. Rxc7 Qd8 29. Qc3 Nb6 30. Rxg7+ Kxg7 31. Qc7+ Kg6 32. Qxb7 Rb8 33. Qc7
Qxc7 34. Rxc7 Kf6 35. Nd3 Ra8 36. Nb4 Nc8 37. Kf2 Ne7 38. Rd7 {1-0 (38)
Lenderman,A (2598)-Nunn,J (2602) London 2014}) 13... h5 {0.12/9 5 (Nf6)} 14. c5
{1.21/22 2} Rf7 {0.06/10 6 (Rf6)} ({Relevant:} 14... Ng6 15. Rc1 Bh6 16. cxd6
cxd6 17. a4 Rf7 18. Nb5 Bd7 19. Rc3 Rg7 20. h3 Nf8 21. Be1 g4 22. fxg4 hxg4 23.
Bxg4 Bxg4 24. hxg4 Nh7 25. Nf2 a6 26. Na3 Bg5 27. Nh3 Rc8 28. Nc4 b5 29. axb5
axb5 30. Na3 Rxc3 31. bxc3 Bh4 (31... Qd7 $19) 32. Nxb5 Bxe1 33. Rxe1 Qb6+ 34.
Nd4 Nef6 35. Nf2 exd4 36. Qxd4 Qb8 37. e5 Nxg4 38. Nxg4 Rxg4 39. exd6 Nf8 40.
d7 Qd6 41. d8=Q Qxd8 {1/2-1/2 (41) Schinke,A (2505)-Mannermaa,J (2501) ICCF
email 2008} 42. d6 $11) 15. Nb5 {1.23/24 5} (15. a4 Nf6 16. a5 Ng6 17. a6 b6
18. cxd6 cxd6 19. Nb4 g4 20. Nc6 Qf8 21. Nb5 g3 22. hxg3 $2 (22. Be1 $16) 22...
fxg3 23. Bxg3 Bh6 24. Bf2 Nf4 25. Kh1 h4 $19 26. Bc4 Rg7 27. Rg1 N4h5 28. Bxh4
Ng3+ 29. Bxg3 Rxg3 30. Re1 Be3 31. Rxe3 Qh6+ 32. Kg1 Qxe3+ 33. Kf1 Rh3 {
0-1 (33) Talla,V (2430)-Koziak,V (2441) Chotowa 2007}) 15... Ng6 {0.11/13 3}
16. cxd6 {1.15/25 11 (a4)} cxd6 {0.18/12 4 (Nxd6)} 17. Nxa7 {1.16/22 1} Bd7 {
0.26/11 3} 18. a4 {1.10/26 4} Bf8 {0.36/11 6 (Nf6)} 19. Nb5 {0.99/27 7 (Kh1)}
Rc8 {0.14/8 10 (Nf6)} 20. b3 {1.24/22 2 (Na7)} Rg7 {0.18/10 5} 21. Kh1 {
1.49/24 2} Nf6 {0.20/13 6 (Nh8)} 22. Rc1 {1.25/26 11} g4 {0.20/14 0 (Rxc1)} 23.
Rxc8 {1.41/25 2} Bxc8 {0.21/15 3} 24. Qc2 {1.18/27 7} Bd7 {0.33/13 4 (Nh7)} 25.
Qc7 {1.47/27 3 (Nc7)} Qe7 {1.13/14 6} 26. Bb6 {1.32/27 12} Kh7 {1.31/15 13 (h4)
} 27. Nc3 {1.42/25 6 (Qd8)} Nh4 {0.16/10 6} 28. Ne1 {1.61/25 3} Qe8 {0.50/14 5}
29. Qd8 {1.67/24 2} Qf7 {0.50/11 0 (Qe7)} 30. Rg1 {2.09/26 11 (a5)} Be7 {
0.25/11 12 (g3)} 31. Qc7 {2.40/24 1 SF10 rated this position +2.4, but after
Black's next move -- the obvious one for any human KID player -- it took its
longest think of the game (30s) and lowered its evaluation to +.95... while
Leela raised its evaluation to -1.26. In a world where the top three engines
-- Stockfish, Komodo, and Houdini -- are almost always very close to each
other in their evaluaitons (with SF being a little faster to get there), it is
encouraging to see another engine who sees things very differently.} g3 {
-0.05/14 9} 32. Bb5 {0.95/29 30 (h3)} (32. h3 Qg6 33. Nb5 (33. Bb5 $4 Bxh3 34.
gxh3 g2+ $19) 33... Bxh3 34. gxh3 g2+ 35. Nxg2 Nxf3 36. Bxf3 Qg3 37. Rf1 Qxh3+
38. Kg1 Ng4 39. Bxg4 Qxg4 $15) 32... Bxb5 {-1.26/15 3} 33. Nxb5 {0.62/29 4} Ng4
{-1.09/14 2 (gxh2)} 34. fxg4 {0.31/27 6 (Nxd6)} (34. h3 Nf2+ $19) 34... hxg4 {
0.02/20 4} 35. Qxb7 {0.30/28 3 (Nxd6)} Qe8 {-1.11/10 8 (f3)} 36. Nc3 {0.99/23
4 (Nc7)} Bg5 {-1.07/11 7 (Qh5)} 37. Qa6 {0.00/32 10} Qh5 {-1.04/12 1} 38. Qc8 {
0.00/32 5} Rf7 {-0.88/13 4} 39. Nd1 {0.00/31 3 (a5)} Rf6 {-0.69/13 5 (Nf5)} 40.
Bf2 {0.00/28 3 (h3)} (40. h3 gxh3 41. Qd7+ {with a perpetual} (41. Qxh3 Rh6 $19
(41... Qxd1 $4 42. Nf3 $18))) 40... Kg7 {-1.22/10 5 (Nf5)} (40... gxf2 41. Nxf2
g3 42. Ng4 $18) 41. b4 {0.00/26 3 (Bb6)} Rf8 {-1.68/11 4 (Nf5)} 42. Qd7+ {
-0.59/27 7} Rf7 {-1.48/14 3} 43. Qe6 {-1.00/32 7 (Qc8)} Rf8 {-1.02/12 10 (Ng6)}
(43... Kh7 $5) 44. b5 {0.00/27 2 (Qd7+)} Rf6 {-0.45/10 4} 45. Qc8 {0.00/29 1 
(Qd7+)} Rf8 {-0.86/10 4} 46. Qe6 {0.00/30 2 (Qc7+)} Rf6 {-0.21/11 4} 47. Qc8 {
0.00/32 1 (Qd7+)} gxh2 {-0.37/17 4 (Rf8)} 48. Rf1 {0.00/25 3} g3 {-0.37/10 0}
49. Qc4 {0.00/28 1 stopping ...Qe2} Nxg2 {0.41/18 5} 50. Bxg3 {0.00/32 2} (50.
Nxg2 f3 $19) 50... Nxe1 {0.29/25 2} 51. Bxe1 {0.00/36 3} Qxd1 {0.38/24 3} 52.
Bh4 {0.00/37 2} Qg4 {0.35/27 3} 53. Bxg5 {0.00/38 1} Qxg5 {0.33/27 4} 54. Qc7+
{0.00/38 2} Rf7 {0.33/24 1} 55. Qc2 {0.00/39 2} f3 {0.34/18 0} 56. Qxh2 {
0.00/41 2} Kf8 {0.33/17 0} 57. b6 {0.00/40 4 (Qh3)} Ke8 {0.45/19 8} 58. b7 {
0.00/41 3} Rxb7 {0.46/22 5} 59. Qh8+ {0.00/38 1} Ke7 {0.43/23 3} 60. Qh3 {
0.00/42 5} Rc7 {0.39/22 3} 61. Rg1 {0.00/41 1 (a5)} (61. a5 Kd8 $11) 61... Rc1
{-0.45/17 7} 62. Qe6+ {0.00/42 1} Kf8 {-0.41/18 5 (Kd8)} 63. Qxd6+ {0.00/39 5}
Ke8 {-0.41/19 4} 64. Qe6+ {0.00/42 1} Kd8 {-0.45/17 2} 65. Qb6+ {0.00/43 3 
(Qd6+)} Kd7 {-0.44/12 4} 66. Qb7+ {0.00/41 1 (Qa7+)} Kd6 {-0.43/13 3} 67. Qa6+
{0.00/43 3 (Qb6+)} Kc5 {-0.45/13 2 (Kd7)} 68. Qb5+ {0.00/42 2} Kd6 {-0.45/14 1}
69. Qb4+ {0.00/43 1} Kc7 {-0.53/19 2 (Kd7)} 70. Qa5+ {0.00/42 1 (Rxc1+)} Kb7 {
-0.53/13 3 (Kd7)} 71. Qb5+ {0.00/34 1} Ka7 {-0.42/16 2} 72. Qa5+ {0.00/39 3}
Kb7 {-0.42/16 2} 73. Qb5+ {0.00/39 1} Kc8 {-0.38/14 4 (Kc7)} 74. Qa6+ {0.00/39
4} Kd7 {-0.32/13 2} 75. Qa7+ {0.00/45 8 (Qb7+)} Kd8 {-0.33/11 2 (Ke8)} 76. Qb6+
{0.00/40 1} Kd7 {-0.20/11 2} 77. Qc6+ {0.00/46 3} Ke7 {-0.04/7 1} 78. Qb7+ {
0.00/43 1 (Qe6+)} Kf8 {-0.33/11 3 (Ke8)} 79. Qc8+ {0.00/46 4 (Qb8+)} Ke7 {
-0.03/8 3} 80. Qb7+ {0.00/44 2 (Qe6+)} Ke8 {-0.26/11 2} 81. Qb5+ {0.00/45 1 
(Qb8+)} Kf8 {-0.28/11 1 (Kf7)} 82. Qb8+ {0.00/46 4} Kf7 {-0.25/12 1} 83. Qc7+ {
0.00/44 1} Ke8 {-0.16/10 2 (Kf8)} 84. Qb8+ {0.00/43 2} Kf7 {-0.04/8 4 (Ke7)}
85. Qb7+ {0.00/46 1 (Qc7+)} Kf6 {-0.14/10 3} 86. Qb6+ {0.00/46 4} Kf7 {-0.04/8
1} 87. Qe6+ {0.00/45 2} Kf8 {-0.01/7 1} 88. Qc8+ {0.00/46 3 (Qd6+)} Kf7 {
-0.01/4 2 (Ke7)} 89. Qd7+ {0.00/38 2} Kf8 {0.00/3 1} 90. Qd6+ {0.00/46 2 (Qc8+)
} Ke8 {-0.01/5 4} 91. Qc6+ {0.00/43 3 (Qe6+)} Kf7 {-0.03/4 2 (Rxc6)} 92. Qe6+ {
0.00/40 2 (Qd7+)} Kf8 {0.00/3 1} 93. Qc8+ {0.00/43 2 Draw accepted} 1/2-1/2
merida
46

..

Author: John Upper
Posted: November 30, 2018, 6:47 pm

The 28th World Senior Chess Championship is underway in Bled, Slovenia. It runs November 18-29, 2018 which is a relatively sedate pace for an 11 round event, which means it is a senior-friendly one-round per day with one day off. It has attracted 330 players, with the Open 65+ section the largest at 180!

 


Canadians

11 Canadians are playing, 7 in the 50+ section and 4 in the 65+. After 9 of 11 rounds, top Canadians are:

IM David Cummings is a point behind coleading GMs Karen Movsziszian and Giorgi Bagaturov (6.5), IM Edward Porper, FM Victor Plotkin, FM Dale Haessel with 6 each in the 50+ section. 

Victor also won the first Blitz tournament with 7.5/9, beating second-place IM Leon Mazi and third-place GM Keith Arkell along the way.

Bill Doubleday is top Canadian in the 65+ with 4.5/9.

 


Links

 


Game of the Week 

It is Black to play after 18.Ng3. What happens if 18... Nd3? What should Black play?

FM Michael Dougherty has 5/9, but is outperforming his FIDE rating by over 150 points. That's largely due to the 3.5/4 he has scored against IMs. Our Canadian Game of the Week is his round 7 win over Slovakian IM Peter Petran

It's funny to think of a 1...g6 player gambiting his pawns for a kingside mating attack, but one of the main ideas of these defences is to tempt White's pawns forward where they and squares behind them can be attacked. So, although this game gets settled by a sharply calculated mating attack, the weak squares that made that attack possible are the goal of Black's opening strategy.

..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "World Senior 50+"]
[Site "Bled"]
[Date "2018.11.26"]
[Round "7"]
[White "Petran, Peter"]
[Black "Dougherty, Michael"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A25"]
[WhiteElo "2256"]
[BlackElo "2155"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "50"]

1. g3 g6 {It's funny to think of a 1...g6 player gambiting his pawns for a
mating attack, but one of the main ideas of these defences is to tempt White's
pawns forward where they and squares behind them can be attacked. So, although
this game gets settled by a sharply calculated mating attack, the weak squares
that make that attack possible are the goal of Black's opening strategy.} 2.
Bg2 Bg7 3. c4 e5 4. Nc3 Nc6 5. e3 d6 6. Nge2 Be6 7. d4 exd4 (7... Bxc4 8. d5
Bxe2 9. Qxe2 Nb8 10. Qb5+ Nd7 11. Qxb7 $14 Rb8 12. Qxa7 Nc5 13. Qa5 f5 14. O-O
e4 15. Nb5 Ne7 16. Rd1 O-O 17. Bf1 Rb7 18. Rb1 Qb8 19. a4 Kh8 20. b3 $16 {
this setup -- Nb5, a4, b3 -- is also a strong way to kill Black's queenside
play in the Benko.} Ng8 21. Ba3 Nf6 22. Bxc5 dxc5 23. Bc4 Ng4 24. d6 cxd6 25.
Nxd6 Ra7 26. Qxc5 Ne5 27. Rd5 Nf3+ 28. Kg2 h5 29. Nb5 Re7 {1-0 King,D (2560)
-Wolff,P (2540) New York, 1990.}) 8. exd4 $2 (8. Nxd4 $1 Bd7 9. O-O Nge7 10. b3
O-O 11. Nde2 Qc8 12. Bb2 {White is clearly better: extra center space,
potential to use d5, and ability to advance his e and f-pawns without
weakening his K much.} Bh3 13. Qd2 Ne5 14. Nf4 Bxg2 15. Kxg2 Nf5 16. e4 Ne7 17.
Ncd5 Nxd5 18. Nxd5 Qd8 19. Rae1 Nd7 {Black will really have to play ...c6 at
some point, but doesn't get around to it until it's too late.} 20. Bxg7 Kxg7
21. f4 f6 22. h4 Re8 23. h5 a5 24. e5 $1 c6 25. exd6 cxd5 26. Rxe8 Qxe8 27. Re1
Qc8 28. Re7+ Kh6 29. hxg6 f5 30. Qd4 Nf8 31. Qf6 {1-0 (31) Flores,D (2562)
-Pancevski,F (2464) Tromsoe Olympiad, 2014.}) 8... Bxc4 $15 9. d5 Ne5 (9...
Nce7 $2 10. Qa4+ b5 11. Nxb5 $14) 10. O-O ({There are no forcing ways to take
advantage of the slightly loose Bc4:} 10. Qa4+ Qd7 $19) (10. f4 Nd3+ $19) 10...
Ne7 11. f4 $2 {White is down a pawn for nothing, and clearly feels he has to
force matters; but just like the Pachman game below, Black plays good moves
and White's position just gets worse.} Nd7 $1 (11... Nd3 $2 12. Qa4+ $13) 12.
Rf2 (12. g4 h5 $1 13. f5 hxg4 $1 14. f6 Nxf6 15. Qd4 Bxe2 16. Rxf6 O-O (16...
Bf3 $1) 17. Ne4 Nf5 $1 18. Qc3 Qe7 19. Bg5 Qe5 20. Re1 Qxc3 21. bxc3 Bc4 22.
Nd2 Bd3 {0-1 (22) Pachman,L-Emma,J Mar del Plata, 1959. This loss cost Pachman
clear 1st at Mar del Plata, where he still tied for first with Najdorf and
finished just ahead of the 15-year-old Fischer.}) 12... Nf5 {Both ...00 and ...
h5 are good too, but this move has the added bonus of goading White into
trying to punish Black... and weakening his own king in the process.} 13. g4
Nh4 {Outpost!} 14. Bh1 (14. b3 Ba6 15. Be3 Bxe2 $6 (15... Nxg2 $17) 16. Rxe2
Bxc3 $4 17. Bd4+ $18) 14... h5 $1 15. gxh5 Qe7 $1 (15... Rxh5 {is also good}
16. Ng3 Qe7 $5 (16... Rh7 $17) 17. Nxh5 gxh5 {with ...000 and ...Rg8 and
positional comp that the computer rates as winning for Black.}) 16. hxg6 O-O-O
$1 17. gxf7 Nc5 $1 18. Ng3 {[#]Critical Position What happens after ...Nd3?}
Nd3 $1 {Black gets an octopus on d3, but hangs the Bg7. This is another move
the computer ranks as best, but only if you play the forcing continuation in
the game.} (18... Qxf7 {defends the Bg7 and also wins:} 19. Be3 Bxc3 20. bxc3
Rdg8 $19) 19. Qg4+ Kb8 20. Qxg7 {White is up a piece and two pawns, but Black
has a winning attack with a series of only moves:} Qe1+ {Only move.} 21. Rf1 (21. Nf1 $2
Qxf2#) 21... Nf2 {Only move.} 22. Bg2 (22. Rxe1 Nh3#) (22. Qg4 {Is an ugly way to
prolong the game, but Black has choices of ways to win, including} Bxf1) 22...
Nf3+ $1 (22... Bxf1 $1 {is mate in six, with variations similar to the game:}
23. Bxf1 (23. Nxf1 Nf3+ {Only move.} 24. Bxf3 Nh3+ 25. Kg2 Qf2+ 26. Kh1 Qxf1+ 27. Qg1
Qxg1#) 23... Nh3+ 24. Kh1 Qf2 25. Bxh3 Nf3 26. Nf1 Qxf1+ 27. Bxf1 Rxh2#) 23.
Bxf3 {Only move.} Bxf1 $1 (23... Nh3+ {also wins, but requires Black to find an
additional sac:} 24. Kh1 Bxf1 {Only move.} 25. Be3 Nf2+ $1 26. Bxf2 Rxh2+ {Only move.} {and mate
in 3.}) 24. Bd2 (24. Nxf1 Nh3+ 25. Kg2 Qf2+ {is the same mate as above.}) 24...
Nh3+ {Only move.} 25. Kh1 Be2+ (25... Bg2+ {is slightly faster} 26. Kxg2 Qf2+ 27. Kh1
Qxf3#) (25... Be2+ {is less efficient but more stylish, giving Black another
chance to sac his Q for a minor piece mate:} 26. Nf1 (26. Rxe1 Bxf3#) 26...
Bxf3+ 27. Qg2 Bxg2+ 28. Kxg2 Qf2+ 29. Kh1 Qg1#) 0-1
merida
46

..

Author: John Upper
Posted: November 27, 2018, 8:43 pm

The CFC received an excellent offer from DGT (Digital Game Technology) to make a purchase of Electronic Chess Sets and Clocks, for tournament use. They are promoting their new line of more affordable, plastic based e-equipment. 

 We are being offered these products at "developmental" prices, that are being offered to many FIDE countries. This is a one time offer. We have received permission to allow our partners to participate as well. It is important to note that you will have to agree that any products you purchase are not to be resold.  

 Our eligible partners are:  

  1. Provincial Associations 
  2. Chess clubs/organizations holding CFC Tournaments 
  3. Organizers holding CFC Tournaments 
  4. Organizers in the process of bidding for upcoming CFC events 
   

We have sent this notice to a preliminary list of eligible partners, but of course we fully anticipate that we have left a number of potentially eligible people off of the list. To become eligible contact Bob Gillanders at the CFC Office, Fred McKim, CFC Treasurer, or Vlad Drkulec, CFC President with your credentials and we’ll approve you within 24 hours. 

 E-mails for all of the above can be found at http://chess.ca/governors-page 

Author: John Upper
Posted: November 9, 2018, 6:28 pm

Our second Canadian Game of the Week is the Round 1.2 game between Canadian Champion WIM Maili-Jade Ouellet and Russian GM Aleksandra Goryachkina at the 2018 Women's World Chess Championship in Khanty-Mansiysk Russia. 

 

The FIDE Women's World Chess Championship runs November 3 - 23, 2018 in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. It is a 64-player knock-out tournament to determine the 2018 FIDE Women's World Championship. All the top women, except Yifan, are competing. Format: 2 game matches with rapid playoffs if necessary. The pairings are 1 vs 64, 2 vs 63 etc. With the sixth-lowest rating, MJ got paired against the #6 seed who outrated her by 409 points, but their first game ended in a draw after both players missed chances. 

MJ had White in game 2 (below). She got a difficult position out of a Nimzo-Rubinstein, and eventually got tangled up defending against Black's pressure on her weak queenside pawns.
Result: Goryachkina advances 1.5 - 0.5.


Links


 
() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "WWCC 2018"]
[Site "Khanty-Mansiysk, RUS"]
[Date "2018.11.04"]
[Round "1.2"]
[White "Ouellet, Maili-Jade"]
[Black "Goryachkina, Aleksandra"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "E56"]
[WhiteElo "2125"]
[BlackElo "2534"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "138"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 d5 6. Nf3 dxc4 7. Bxc4 c5 8. O-O
Nc6 9. a3 {[#]} Ba5 (9... Bxc3 {is an equally popular and viable option.}) 10.
dxc5 $2 {White has tried lots of other moves, though none of them promised a
plus:} (10. Ne2 $5) (10. Qd3) (10. Bd3) 10... Bxc3 $1 {[#] Black hasn't lost a
tempo over 9...Bxc3 since in that line White hadn't (and wouldn't) take on c5;
but now White has three queenside isos to defend.  Stockfish and Leela both
rate this as between equal and slightly better for White, but the further you
follows their lines the better for Black they rate it.  Between humans, Black
scores 68% and Elo +100 from here.} 11. bxc3 Qxd1 {Goryachkina is a grinder.} (
11... Qa5 {is equally popular.} 12. Bd3 e5 13. Qc2 Rd8 14. Ng5 h6 15. Ne4 Nxe4
16. Bxe4 Qxc5 $15 {0-1 (43) Ubiennykh,E (2307)-Kosteniuk,A (2556) Sochi 2016})
12. Rxd1 Na5 {The first of five times Black will play a N to this square.} 13.
Ba2 (13. Rd4 Nd7 14. a4 Nxc5 15. Ba3 b6 16. Ba2 (16. Bxc5 bxc5 17. Rh4) 16...
Bb7 (16... Ncb3 $5 17. Bxf8 Nxd4 {Only move.} 18. cxd4 {is still a position Black could
hope to play for a win.}) 17. Bxc5 bxc5 18. Rd6 $1 Rfd8 19. Rad1 Nc6 20. Bc4
Kf8 21. Rxd8+ Rxd8 22. Rxd8+ Nxd8 23. Nd2 Ke7 $11 {0-1 (51) Bouget,A (2256)
-Favarel,A (2359) Condom 2015}) 13... Bd7 14. Rd4 Rfc8 15. Bb2 (15. a4 $5 {
is a try to wrong-foot Black, but Black just has to take her time and she'll
come out with a slightly better position} Be8 $1 (15... Rxc5 {is fine too} 16.
Ba3 Rc7 17. Ne5) 16. Ba3 Nd7 $11) 15... Rxc5 16. Rad1 Be8 17. Ne1 Nc6 {[#]} 18.
Rc4 ({trading Rs makes it easier for Black's minors to dominate.} 18. R4d2 $5
$15) 18... Rxc4 19. Bxc4 Na5 $15 20. Ba2 Ba4 21. Rd4 Bb3 $1 {Trades White's
better B or pushes it to a worse line; either way, Black increases control
over c4.} 22. Bxb3 Nxb3 23. Rb4 Na5 24. e4 b6 25. f3 Rc8 26. Kf2 Nc6 27. Rb3
Ne8 28. Ke2 Nd6 29. Nd3 {[#]} f5 $6 {I don't understand this move: there's no
need to try force or allow pawn structure changes when Black dominates the
only area of the board with pawn weaknesses.} ({Slow playing with} 29... f6 {
keeps the advantages (play on the c-file) without opening up anywhere else.})
30. Nf2 (30. exf5 $1 $15 {or on the next moves looks sensible, avoiding
another isolated pawn.}) 30... Kf7 31. a4 Nb7 32. Nd3 {[#]} Rd8 $6 (32... Nca5
33. Rb4 Nc6 {testing} 34. Rb3 (34. Rc4 $2 Nba5 {traps the R} 35. Ne5+ Kf6 $19)
34... fxe4 35. fxe4 Nd6 $17) 33. Bc1 ({Again,} 33. exf5 $1 exf5 {should
simplify White's defence. Surprisingly, Stockfish rates this position as equal
after} 34. c4) 33... fxe4 (33... Rxd3 $2 34. Kxd3 Nc5+ 35. Kc2 {and Black has
just traded two active pieces for two poor ones.}) 34. fxe4 {Now White has
three isos to Black's one, but White's can be attacked more easily than the
one on e6.} Nd6 35. Nf2 e5 36. Rb1 Ke6 37. Be3 Rc8 38. Rd1 (38. Kd3 Rd8 39. Ke2
Na5 $17) 38... Na5 39. Kd3 Ndc4 40. Bc1 Nb3 $19 {Threatening ...Nxc1 then ...
Nb2+ wins the a-pawn. White is too tied up to stop it.} 41. Kc2 (41. Ng4 Rd8+
42. Ke2 (42. Kc2 $2 Na1+ {gets an exchange}) 42... Nxc1+ 43. Rxc1 Rd2+ 44. Kf3
Ra2 $19) 41... Nc5 {[#]A picture of Black making the most of the c-file.} 42.
a5 Nxa5 43. Ba3 Ncb7 44. Rd3 Nc4 45. Bc1 Nc5 46. Rg3 Rc7 47. h4 Nd6 48. Re3 Na4
49. Kb3 b5 50. h5 Nc5+ 51. Ka2 Nc4 52. Rg3 Rf7 53. Rf3 Nd6 54. Be3 Ndxe4 55.
Nxe4 Nxe4 56. Rxf7 Kxf7 {[#]} 57. Bxa7 (57. Kb3 {doesn't help} a6 58. Kb4 h6
59. c4 bxc4 60. Kxc4 Nf6 {with an easy win.}) 57... Nxc3+ 58. Kb3 Nd5 59. Kc2
Nf6 60. h6 gxh6 61. Be3 h5 62. Bc5 Ke6 63. Kd3 Kf5 64. Bf2 Nd5 65. Ke2 e4 66.
Bd4 b4 67. g3 Kg4 68. Be5 b3 69. Kd2 Kf3 0-1
merida
46

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Author: John Upper
Posted: November 6, 2018, 9:07 pm