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The San Miguel Open is a 7-round Swiss tournament taking place from 17-23 September 2018 in Trevias, Spain. Players receive 90 minutes for the entire game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one. Live game with analysis will be provided daily with the best chess software competing in the Top Chess Engine Championship – [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: September 17, 2018, 6:24 pm
The Satka Autumn Russian Cup Women is a 9-round Swiss tournament taking place from 11-19 September 2018 in Satka, Russia. Players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one. Live game with analysis will be provided daily with the [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: September 12, 2018, 2:46 pm
The 5th Anogia “Fischer Memorial” GM-norm tournament is held from 11-19 September 2018 in Anogia, Crete, Greece. The tournament is part of the Heraklion IT Grand Prix, which is in its 8th year, and is part of a series of closed norm tournaments. It is a 10-player invitational round-robin event. Players receive 90 minutes for [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: September 11, 2018, 12:12 pm
The 5th Anogia “Capablanca Memorial” GM-norm tournament is held from 11-19 September 2018 in Anogia, Crete, Greece. The tournament is part of the Heraklion IT Grand Prix, which is in its 8th year, and is part of a series of closed norm tournaments. It is a 10-player invitational round-robin event. Players receive 90 minutes for [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: September 11, 2018, 12:09 pm
The 3rd Anogia “Capablanca Memorial” IM-norm tournament is held from 11-19 September 2018 in Anogia, Crete, Greece. The tournament is part of the Heraklion IT Grand Prix, which is in its 8th year, and is part of a series of closed norm tournaments. It is a 10-player invitational round-robin event. Players receive 90 minutes for [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: September 11, 2018, 12:06 pm
The Chess House GM tournament is a 10-player round-robin tournament taking place from 8-16 September 2018 in Aarhus, Denmark. Players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one. No draws are allowed before move 30. Live game with analysis [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: September 10, 2018, 11:01 am
The Croatian League 1A is a 10-team round-robin tournament taking place from 8-16 September 2018 in Biograd, Croatia. Players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one. Live game with analysis will be provided daily with the best chess [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: September 9, 2018, 2:35 pm
The World Girls Junior Championship is an 11-round Swiss open taking place in Gebze, Kocaeli, Turkey from 5-15 September 2018. The winner becomes the World Girls Junior Champion and receives 2,000 Euros and the WGM title. The 2nd and 3rd placed players receive the WIM title. The time control is 90 minutes for 40 moves [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: September 5, 2018, 8:21 am
The World Junior Championship is an 11-round Swiss open taking place in Gebze, Kocaeli, Turkey from 5-15 September 2018. The winner becomes the World Junior Champion and receives 3,000 Euros and the GM title. The 2nd and 3rd placed players receive the IM title. The time control is 90 minutes for 40 moves then 30 [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: September 5, 2018, 8:17 am
The Santiago Masters is a 10-player round-robin tournament taking place from 5-13 September 2018 in Santiago Compostela, Spain. Players receive 90 minutes for the entire game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one. Live game with analysis will be provided daily with the best chess software competing in the Top Chess Engine Championship – [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: September 4, 2018, 5:56 am

Canadian Chess Newsfeed

The past two years have been unprecedented in Canadian chess publishing history, with five chess book written by Canadians being published:

  • IM David Cummings, The English (Everyman, 2016)
  • IM Raja Panjwani, The Hyper Accelerated Dragon (Thinker's Press, 2017)
  • George Huczek, A to Z Chess Tactics (Batsford, 2017)
  • IM Jean Hébert, The Sicilian: Thematic Sacrifices and Attacks (Le pion passé, 2017)
  • IM Michael Song and GM Razvan Preotu, The Chess Attacker's Handbook (Gambit, 2017)

Everyman Chess has announced an upcoming publication which will be the sixth chess book in two years written by Canadians:  

brothers Joshua Doknjas and FM John Doknjas: Opening Repertoire: The Najdorf, 320 pages; publication dates: Europe: Nov. 2018, North America: Jan. 2019

Links


A Najdorf book by who?

A skeptical first thought might be: how can a young FM, and an even younger NM, possibly write a good book on the Najdorf? 

That's actually two questions:

  1. How could an FM and NM write a good Najdorf repertoire book? 
  2. How could anyone write a good Najdorf repertoire book? 

Let's look at that second question first.

The Massively Theoretical Najdorf

The Najdorf is the most tactically and strategically complex opening in chess, with decades of history and thousands of top-level games.

The Najdorf Sicilian begins with the following  opening moves:

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6

After which White has a wide choice of reasonable continuations: 

6. Bg5, Be2, Be3, Bc4, f3, f4, h3, g3, a4, Rg1, even a2-a3, and others. 

That's a lot of options for White which Black has to be ready for, and none of those moves are safely ignored as silly sidelines: Magnus Carlsen has played six of those 11, and Kasparov, Anand, and Fischer have played the others. The first four of those options have more than 20,000 games in the ChessBase Megabase -- each. Even restricting ourselves to games played between 2600+ players in the past 10 years -- so no Kasparov, no Fischer, no Tal -- and there are still a daunting 1900+ games. 

That volume of games has not daunted everyone. Here is a list of recent Najdorf books from the Black side:

  • Winning with the Najdorf Sicilian, (New in Chess, 2013) by GM Zaven Andriasyan
  • The Sharpest Sicilian, (Chess Stars, 2012) by GMs Kiril Georgiev and Atanas Kolev
  • Play the Najdorf Sicilian, (Gambit, 2010) by IM James Rizzitano
  • Starting Out: Sicilian Najdorf, (Everyman, 2007), IM Richard Palliser 
  • Mastering the Najdorf (Gambit, 2004), by a Spanish GM and IM.

Three things are worth noticing about this list:

  • only 4 books in 10 years on the Najdorf is surprisingly few for an opening which is popular at all levels;
  • there hasn't been an Everyman book on the Najdorf for over 10 years;
  • there are no Quality Chess books in this list.

That last point is particularly interesting, and suggests a challenge with writing a repertoire book for the Black side of the Najdorf. Quality Chess is the current gold-standard for high-level and detailed repertoire books. You can find anti-Najdorf repertoires in the Quality Chess books by GM Parimarjan Negi (Grandmaster Repertoire - 1.e4 vs The Sicilian I) and by GM John Shaw (Playing 1.e4: Sicilian Main Lines). The Negi book is 306 dense pages and deals only with 6.Bg5 lines. 

But Quality Chess has not yet attempted a Najdorf repertoire book from the Black side. They announced "Playing the Najdorf" -- a title which QC uses for books where complete games outline a repertoire, but with less encyclopedic coverage than their GM Repertoire series -- for release in "late 2017 or 2018", but have not added it to their list of "Coming Soon" titles, or even said who the author will be!? The only Quality Chess book on the Najdorf is "The Cutting Edge: Sicilian Najdorf 6.Be3" by GM Milos Pavlovic (2011), which was to be followed by a volume on the 6.Bg5 Najdorf, but which has yet to be advertised. 

It might be that QC has just made some unlucky choices about prospective authors; or it may be that they have chosen well, but each time their authors have broken down in the face of the overwhelming amount of material to cover for a detailed analysis of the Najdorf -- few are as fanatically dedicated as GM Kotronias, whose five-volume, 3,000 page repertoire series on the King's Indian currently stands as the benchmark for any "complete" repertoire book(s). Or maybe, unless you have a wonderfully obsessive analyst like Kotronias, an extremely detailed repertoire book on the Najdorf is not possible. If so, then a less detailed repertoire book is the only way to go, and there's no reason such a book can't be written. 

Can an FM and an NM write a good Najdorf repertoire book? 

I think it is generally assumed that players can only analyze or explain chess to those who are weaker than them. If that were true, then a book by an FM/NM combo would be suitable for experts on down. That might not sound like much -- nowhere near as impressive as having the factually accurate "GM Repertoire" in the title -- but it's still the vast majority of chess players, and it is probably very close to 100% of the chess opening book-buying world, since titled players now use almost only databases to prep their openings. 

But is that assumption true? 50 years ago it probably was. Back then, the only way to get to get a reliable evaluation of a position or to see well-chosen examples from chess's long history was to consult a very strong player. But today, databases put the history of the game at anyone's fingertips, engines provide reliable (if wordless) evaluations, and the ever-growing library of annotated games (both books and databases) means that anyone who wants to can find what world-class players have said about those games. It takes time, dedication, some computer skill, and good editors, but it can certainly be done.

Would it be as good as a repertoire book by a world-class player? In fact, a lot of it would be identical -- based on precedents and computer analysis -- but the thoroughness, imagination, and quality of some of the moves would probably be higher if produced by a 2700 GM and his seconds. Would that make it a better book?

Imagine MVL, the world's leading expert on the Najdorf, decided to publish all of his analysis on the Najdorf. Would that be a good book on the Najdorf? For titled players with the Najdorf on either side of their repertoire it would be gold: look at the variations you're struggling with and see what Maxime would do! Personally, I would be fascinated to look it over, if only to get a sense of how much a super-GM has studied his main lines; but I'm sure I couldn't retain more than 5% of his analysis, and so it wouldn't be a good book for me.

In a sense, MVL -- and all the top GMs -- already do share their home analysis: we see it in their games and (to varying degrees) in their post-mortems and analyses. If you want to know what MVL or Giri or Kramnik think about an opening, just analyze their games. Their games don't show us everything they know, or even a fraction of what is in their home prep files, but it does show what they think is good -- or good enough -- and does so at a less-than-overwhelming bitrate. 

Quantity and Quality

And this brings us to the flip-side of that "daunting" tens of thousands of games played in the Najdorf. Is it possible that this is actually an advantage to the non-GM author? 

Imagine that you are considering buying (or writing!?) a book on a real odd-ball opening -- maybe ...c6 + ...d6 vs everything. There are so few high-level games that start this way that most of the variations would be new and untested, and many of the middlegame positions would require strategic judgments that would have to come mostly from the author since in most lines it would be impossible to use our great predecessors as models. In such a case, the skill set of the author would have to be much higher than in a well-worn opening.

And the Najdorf is now a very well-worn opening. It is no longer unexplored territory: as the list of titles above shows, this won't be the first book on the Najdorf; and those thousands of games show what the world's best players thought and think about those positions. And computer engines can, thankfully, correct some of their errors.

To return to the two skeptical questions:

Q: Is there anyone who can write a good repertoire book on the Najdorf?
A: Depends what you want in a repertoire book. Nobody has found someone who can write a hyper-detailed GM Repertoire book in the Quality Chess mould…  but a less exhaustively detailed repertoire? – sure – just don’t expect it to answer all your questions or deal with all your opponent’s moves.

Q: Can an FM and NM write a good Najdorf repertoire book?
A: Yes. And if they skillfully use the books, databases and computer engines currently available, they have a better shot at writing a good Najdorf book than for some rarer openings.

That raises one follow-up question:

Q: Didl they?
A: We'll see...

... but, for now, here's a hintJoshua Doknjas annotates his win over Alina L'Ami -- in a Najdorf -- from the 2017 Reykjavik Open.


..
() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Reykjavik Open"]
[Site "Reykjavik"]
[Date "2017.04.26"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Doknjas, Joshua"]
[Black "L'Ami, Alina"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B90"]
[WhiteElo "2123"]
[BlackElo "2324"]
[Annotator "Joshua Doknjas"]
[PlyCount "127"]
[EventDate "2017.??.??"]
[EventCountry "ISL"]

{Playing in the 2017 Reykjavik Open was a great experience. The tournament was
very well organized and it was exciting to play alongside some of the top
players in the world. One of the main drawbacks is that everything in Iceland
is very expensive, e.g., a regular hamburger was about $20 bucks.   The game I
am annotating was played in the 9th round. At this point in the tournament, I
had 5/8, and I knew I had to win if I wanted to fight for some of the category
prizes.} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. h3 e5 7. Nde2 {
[#] Already at this point my opponent was spending a lot of time. In my
preparation, I saw that my opponent had barely any games where White played 6.
h3. I decided to spend most of my time looking at the main line with 7... h5
and the sharper lines with 6... e6.} Be6 $6 {Especially if this move is not
followed up with ...d5, White should be getting a much better position out of
the opening.} 8. g4 Be7 9. Bg2 h6 10. Ng3 g6 $5 {[#] This move really
surprised me. 10... g6 seemed to just weaken the h6-pawn and prevent Black
from castling. Now, instead of playing a normal move like 11.Be3 or 11.0-0, I
looked for a way to really punish my opponent's last move.} 11. f4 $6 (11. Be3
$142 $16 Nbd7 (11... Kf8 12. Qd2 Kg7 13. Nd5 $16) 12. Qd2 Nb6 13. b3 $16) 11...
Qb6 $1 {I completely missed this move. I was expecting either 11... exf4 or 11.
..Nc6. In both cases, White would have a much better position. After 11...Qb6,
White's position gets a lot harder to play.} (11... exf4 12. Bxf4 $16) (11...
Nc6 12. f5 $16) 12. f5 gxf5 13. Nxf5 $6 {I remember playing this move fairly
quickly. I thought that getting the Bishop pair would just give White an
advantage. However, as it turns out, Black has some dangerous counterplay with
...d5.} (13. exf5 Bc4 $13) 13... Bxf5 14. exf5 {[#]} Nc6 ({Playing ...d5 right
here is an option for Black as well:} 14... d5 $5 15. Qe2 (15. Nxd5 $2 Nxd5 16.
Qxd5 Bh4+ $17 17. Ke2 (17. Kd1 Nc6 $19) 17... Qf2+ 18. Kd1 Nc6 $17) 15... d4
$13 (15... e4 $5 $13)) 15. Qe2 {[#]} ({Stopping Black's counterplay with ...d5
makes more sense. However, during the game, I wasn't really afraid of it.} 15.
Nd5 Nxd5 16. Qxd5 $11) 15... d5 (15... Nd4 $1 $17 {Playing this move before ...
d5 forces White's queen into a bad position. Also, Black's Knight on d4 will
be a huge problem for White in some lines.} 16. Qf2 (16. Qd3 d5 $15) 16... d5
17. O-O (17. Nxd5 $2 Nxd5 18. Bxd5 Qa5+ $19) (17. Bxd5 $2 Nxd5 18. Nxd5 Qa5+ (
18... Qc6 {also wins.}) 19. Nc3 Bh4 $1 20. Qxh4 Nf3+ $19) 17... Ne2+ 18. Kh1
Qxf2 {and Black is much better in this endgame.}) 16. Bxd5 {[#] I don't
remember even looking at any move besides this. It seemed to me that this was
just more natural and stronger than 16. Nxd5.} Nxd5 (16... Nd4 $1 {Again,
throwing in this move first would have been much better for Black.} 17. Qg2
Nxd5 18. Nxd5 Qc5 19. Ne3 (19. Nc3 $2 Bh4+ 20. Kf1 O-O-O) 19... Bh4+ 20. Kf1
O-O-O) 17. Nxd5 Qa5+ 18. Qd2 Bh4+ 19. Kf1 Qb5+ 20. Kg2 {[#]} Qc4 $2 {This
wasn't the best way for Black to show compensation for the pawn.} (20... O-O-O
21. c4 $1 Qc5 $44 (21... Qxc4 $2 22. Nb6+ $18)) 21. Nc7+ Ke7 22. Nxa8 Qe4+ 23.
Kh2 Nd4 {[#]} 24. f6+ $1 {Without this move, Black has dangerous compensation
for the Rook. White's idea is to divert Black's Bishop from the attack or put
Black's King into a bad position.} (24. Rf1 $2 Rc8 $1 {activating the Rook
first before ...Ne2.} (24... Ne2 $4 25. f6+ Bxf6 (25... Ke8 26. Nc7+ Kf8 27.
Qd8#) 26. Re1 $18) 25. c3 Ne2 $44 26. Rg1 (26. f6+ Ke8 $11) 26... Bf2 $11)
24... Bxf6 (24... Kf8 25. Rf1 {and Black is unable to continue the attack.})
25. Rf1 Rxa8 26. Qf2 Qxc2 27. Bd2 Qg6 28. Bb4+ Ke6 29. Rae1 Rd8 30. Bc3 Nc6 31.
Qb6 Rd7 {[#] Around here I was in serious time pressure and finding a way to
win without giving Black counterplay proved to be challenging.} 32. Rf5 (32.
Rxf6+ $5 $18 Qxf6 33. Rxe5+) 32... h5 33. Bxe5 (33. Rfxe5+ $1 Bxe5+ 34. Rxe5+
Kd6 35. Re2 $1 {and White threatens Bb4+ Qc5# During the game, I didn't even
consider 33.Rfxe5.}) 33... Rd2+ 34. Kh1 Bxe5 35. Rexe5+ (35. Rfxe5+ Kd6 36. Re7
$18) 35... Kd6 36. g5 Rd1+ 37. Kg2 Qg7 {[#]} 38. Rf6+ $5 (38. Qc5+ Kc7 39. Re7+
Kb8 {This is completely winning for White after either Rook takes on f7, but
with extremely low time on the clock, I thought that it would be too dangerous
to allow Black's Queen to come down to the 2nd rank.}) 38... Kxe5 39. Qe3+ Kd5
40. Qf3+ Kc4 41. Qc3+ Kd5 42. Rd6+ Kxd6 43. Qxg7 Rd2+ 44. Kf1 Nd8 45. Qh6+ Ke7
46. g6 Rd6 47. Qe3+ Kf6 48. Qf4+ Ke7 {[#]} 49. Qe5+ $2 {Right after I let go
of my Queen, I realized I missed a much more straightforward and nicer way to
win. The endgame is still easily winning for White as Black's pawns start to
fall.} (49. Qxd6+ $1 Kxd6 50. g7 $18) 49... Re6 50. Qc7+ Ke8 51. gxf7+ Nxf7 52.
Qxb7 Rf6+ 53. Kg2 Rg6+ 54. Kh2 Kf8 55. a4 Kg7 56. b4 h4 57. a5 Rg3 {[#]} 58.
Qe7 Rg5 59. Qa7 Kg6 60. Qxa6+ Kf5 61. Qd3+ Kf6 62. Qf3+ Ke6 63. Qe4+ Ne5 64. a6
{After this game I had 6/9; and going into the 10th and final round, I was
leading the U2200 section and Top Junior category. I was paired with GM
Ramirez in the final round and lost.  At the end of the 2017 Reykjavik Open I
won two prizes: U2200 - 2nd Place and Top Junior - 2nd Place, (ahead of IM
Praggnanandhaa Rameshbabu who placed 3rd, and IM Awonder Liang who fell out of
the top 3).} 1-0
merida
46
..
Author: John Upper
Posted: September 19, 2018, 7:44 pm

2018 Canadian Olympiad Teams and Board Order

The line-up and board orders for the Canadian Olympiad teams have been updated:

Open

  1. GM Eric Hansen
  2. GM Razvan Preotu
  3. IM Nikolay Noritsyn
  4. GM Evgeny Bareev
  5. GM Aman Hambleton

Captain: FM Victor Plotkin

Women

  1. WIM Agnieska Matras-Clement
  2. WGM Qiyu Zhou
  3. WIM Maili-Jade Ouellet
  4. WFM Svitlana Demchenko
  5. Lali Agbabishvilli

Captain: GM Gergely Szabo


Notes:

  • GM Alexandre LeSiege was originally on the team, but had to withdraw due to a family emergency. The next eligible player, IM Raja Panjwani, was unable to substitute at such short notice. GM Bareev agreed to replace LeSiege; the fact that he has played little since scoring +3 =3 -4 as Canada's board 1 at the 2016 Baku Olympiad probably explains why he will be board 4, even though his FIDE rating is the highest in Canada.
  • GM Anton Kovalyov, who won the silver medal on board 2 at the 2016 Olympiad, declined to play in the Olympiad as it is organized by the thuggish Zurab Azmaiparashvili. (more here)
  • WIM Yuanling Yuan, Canada's #1 FIDE-rated woman,  was not eligible as she had not played enough games prior to the selection period. She does still play, including events in London'17 and Biel'18, and may well return to the team for more Olympiads.
  • This will be the first Olympiad for Razvan, Agnieska, and Svitlana.
  • The Women's team is in their exact FIDE-rating order. 
  • All the players on the women's team speak English as a second, or third, or fourth language:
    1. Polish
    2. Chinese
    3. French
    4. Russian
    5. Georgian

2018 Chess Olympiad: Batumi, Georgia

The Chess Olympiad is an 11 round Swiss-system 4-player team tournaments, held in two sections: Women and Open. It is held every two years and is the largest elite level tournament on the chess calendar. In 2016 a total of 304 teams were entered in the two sections, with the USA taking the Open and China winning the Women's.

The 43rd Chess Olympiad will be held in Batumi, Georgia -- on the east coast of the Black Sea, just north of Turkey -- September 23 - October 7, 2018.

Links

Olympiad Homepage

Canada's Top FIDE ratings

Live Coverage

the ChessBrah twitch channel will feature free live commentary by GMs Yasser Seirawan and Robin van Kampen, and will have links to Vlogs from GMs Hansen and Hambleton.

Author: John Upper
Posted: September 17, 2018, 8:05 pm

Our Canadian Game of the Week comes from the 2018 Toronto Open, and features cowinner Nicholas Vettese beating IM Artiom Samsonkin in an endgame stemming from a rare line in the French...


The 2018 Toronto Open took place over the Labour Day weekend, September 1-3, at the Annex Chess Club. It was a 6-round Swiss in four sections and attracted 194 players.

Top seeds in the Crown section were IMs Nikolay Noritsyn and Artiom Samsonkin, but they both finished behind co-winning juniors Nicholas Vettese and Rohan Talukdar with 5/6. Nikolay was clear 3rd with 4.5/6 after losing to Hairan Liang in round 3 and being held to a draw in the final round by Nicholas. Special congratulations to Nicholas, who not only finished =1st, but with a 2641 TPR he gained 64 points to push his CFC rating over 2400 and which should top up his summer FIDE rating gain to over 100 points and near 2300!

Section Winners: (each with 5.5/6)

  • U2200 Nikhil Joshi 
  • U1800 Henry Liu 
  • U1400 Keith Denning 

 

Thanks:

  • Erik Malmsten for sending me the photo (which shows the top boards during the final round, with Vettese - Noritsyn closest, and Talukdar sitting next to Nikolay).
  • Organizer and TD Marcus Wilker and Alex Ferreira for sending me a photo of the game score.

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Toronto Open"]
[Site "Toronto"]
[Date "2018.09.01"]
[Round "5.1"]
[White "Vettese, Nicholas"]
[Black "Samsonkin, Artoim"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C10"]
[WhiteElo "2341"]
[BlackElo "2553"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "59"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventCountry "CAN"]
[SourceTitle "Annex CC"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nc6 {[#] Played about 20x less frequently than the
main moves -- ....Bb4 and ...Nf6 -- but there are still a lot of GM games and
theory here. In his book "Dangerous Weapons: The French" (Everyman, 2007),
John Watson dubbed this the "Hecht-Reefschläger" variation, after the two
Germans who played it frequently. More tellingly, Watson called that chapter
"Swearing in Church", since blocking the c7 pawn is a kind of heresy among
French players.   More recently, both Jobava and Rozentalis have played it
repeatedly, though both with an Elo minus.} 4. Nf3 Nf6 {Again, White has
several decent options: e5 and Bg5 being the most popular.} 5. Bd3 (5. exd5
exd5 6. Bb5 Bg4 7. h3 Bxf3 8. Qxf3 Be7 9. Bg5 a6 10. Bxc6+ bxc6 11. O-O O-O 12.
Rfe1 h6 13. Bh4 Qd7 14. Re2 a5 15. Rae1 Bd8 16. b3 Rb8 17. Na4 Ne4 18. Bxd8
Rbxd8 19. Qf4 Qd6 20. Qxd6 cxd6 21. c4 Nf6 22. Rc1 Rb8 23. cxd5 cxd5 $16 {
with a bigger advantage than Fischer needed to convert in his match with
Petrosian; (1-0, 46) Fischer-Petrosian Buenos Aires (m9) 1971.}) (5. e5 Ne4 6.
Bd3 Bb4 7. Bd2 (7. O-O {is possible, gambiting for development.}) 7... Nxd2 8.
Qxd2 O-O 9. a3 Ba5 10. b4 Bb6 11. Na4 Nxd4 12. Nxd4 Bxd4 13. Bxh7+ Kxh7 14.
Qxd4 {with what looks like a good N vs bad B middlegame, but one where
computers slightly prefer Black after ...b6; Sevian,S (2624)-Shtembuliak,E 
(2506) Philadelphia 2018 (1-0, 39).}) 5... Bb4 (5... Nb4 {has been played by
French GM Christain Bauer a few times. It makes sense of ...Nc6 by gaining the
B-pair, but falls further behind in development, and it's not clear how good
the B-pair will really be when the center gets closed.}) 6. O-O Bxc3 $1 {
Otherwise, White goes e4-e5 then Ne2 and Black will get squashed with no play
at all.} 7. exd5 {Only move.} {[#]Black has a couple of ways to win a pawn, but White
gets enough for it in either case.} exd5 (7... Nxd5 $2 8. bxc3 Nxc3 9. Qd2 Nd5
{the B-pair, half-open center, and development lead give White more than
enough comp for the pawn.} 10. c4 (10. Ba3 $16) 10... Ndb4 $2 11. Bb1 O-O 12.
a3 Na6 13. Bxh7+ $1 $18) (7... Nxd4 $6 8. bxc3 Nxf3+ 9. Qxf3 Qxd5 10. Qg3 $14 {
as above, the B-pair, half-open center, and development lead give White enough
comp for the pawn.} O-O 11. c4 Qd4 12. Be3 Qg4 13. Qxc7 $16 {1-0 (37)
Areshchenko,A (2667)-Zaragatski,I (2475) Germany 2010}) (7... Bxd4 8. dxc6 Bb6
9. Qe2 (9. cxb7 Bxb7 $14) 9... bxc6 10. Ne5 Bb7 11. Bg5 h6 12. Bh4 Qd4 13. Bg3
O-O (13... Qxb2 $2 14. Ng6 $3 fxg6 15. Qxe6+ Kd8 16. Bxg6 $18) 14. c3 Qd5 15.
Rad1 c5 $1 16. Bh7+ Nxh7 17. Rxd5 exd5 18. c4 d4 19. Nd3 Rfe8 $14 {(1-0, 67)
Brkic,A (2590)-Jobava,B (2685) Batumi 2018}) 8. bxc3 {This pawn structure is
very common in the Petroff, though usually via ...Nf6-e4xc3 so Black would
still have the DSB. It also comes from an anti-Winawer line (3...Bb4 4.exd5)
where White usually has to spend a tempo with a2-a3 to induce ...Bxc3. That
extra tempo for White is doubly useful here, since Ba3 is also an option.} O-O
9. h3 Re8 10. Re1 Ne4 11. Ng5 $5 (11. c4 Bf5 (11... Nb4 $6 12. cxd5 Qxd5 $2 13.
c4 $18) 12. Bf4 (12. cxd5 $1) 12... Nb4 13. a3 Nxd3 14. cxd3 Nf6 15. Qb3 b6 16.
Rxe8+ Nxe8 $14 {0-1 (53) Kathmale,S (2367)-Puranik,A (2514) Abu Dhabi 2018})
11... Bf5 $1 (11... Nxc3 $4 {is obviously awful:} 12. Bxh7+ Kf8 13. Ba3+ $18) (
11... Nxg5 $6 12. Bxg5 (12. Rxe8+ Qxe8 13. Bxg5) 12... Rxe1+ (12... f6 $2 13.
Qh5 $18) 13. Qxe1 {with the B pair and a relatively open positon.}) 12. Nxe4 {
[#]} Bxe4 (12... dxe4 13. Bb5 (13. Bf1 $14 {would be the Karpov move, keeping
the B safe until after White clears up the pawn situation.}) 13... Qd5 14. c4
$5 Qxd4 15. Qxd4 Nxd4 16. Bxe8 Rxe8 (16... Nxc2 $2 17. Re2 Nxa1 18. Ba4 {
traps the N.}) 17. Rb1 (17. Rd1 Nxc2 18. Rb1 e3 19. fxe3 {Only move.} Nxe3 20. Bxe3 Bxb1
21. Rxb1 Rxe3 22. Rxb7 $11) 17... Nxc2 18. Re2 Nd4 {with some comp.}) 13. Bxe4
dxe4 14. d5 $5 {Computers disapprove, but transferring the pawns to light
squares before Black can blockade makes sense.} Ne7 (14... Na5 15. Qd4 f5 16.
c4 b6 17. Bb2 $13) 15. c4 Ng6 16. Qd4 {Black has a tough decision here.} Qf6 $6
{This goes into an endgame where Black is a bit worse, but may have thought
his drawing chances were better than in the middle game after ...f5 where
White has attacking chances and Black has no clear counterplay.} (16... f5 {
feels loose, and White can consider R lifts along the 3rd.}) 17. Qxf6 gxf6 18.
Bb2 f5 19. Rad1 Rad8 20. c5 c6 21. d6 {[#]} Re6 $2 {Probably the losing move.}
(21... Ne5 {doesn't help, because of the vulnerable black K;} 22. Re3 $1 Nc4 $2
(22... f6 23. Rb3 $16) 23. Rg3+ $18 {and Bg7-f6 with checks wins material.}) (
21... b6 {Is the move Black wants to play, and it is playable now, though
White seems to keep a plus in all lines.} 22. cxb6 (22. Bd4 bxc5 (22... Nf4 23.
cxb6 $16) 23. Bxc5 Rd7 $14) (22. Re3 bxc5 23. Ba3 (23. Ra3 Re6 $2 24. Rxa7
Rexd6 25. Rxd6 Rxd6 26. Ra8+ Nf8 27. a4 $18) 23... Re5 24. Rc3 {Black is under
pressure, but not under ground.}) 22... axb6 23. Re3 Re6 24. Rb3 b5 25. d7 $1
$14 {a subtle move?} Nf8 (25... Re7 26. c4 $16 {creates an outside passer.}
bxc4 $4 27. Rb8 $1 $18) 26. c4 bxc4 27. Rb7 {with a position only White can
win.} Re7 $2 28. Ba3 {Only move.} Rexd7 29. Rdxd7 Nxd7 (29... Rxd7 30. Rb8 $18) 30. Be7
$18) 22. Re3 $1 {If the game goes Ra3 forcing a7-a6 then Black's b7 pawn would
be backwards on a half-open file, and Black could only undermine the d6-pawn
by giving White a new passer on b6.} b6 23. Ra3 f4 (23... bxc5 24. Rxa7 Rexd6
25. Rxd6 Rxd6 26. Ra8+ Nf8 27. a4 {with the pin on the Nf8 requiring a couple
of moves to clear, there is no stopping the a-pawn.}) 24. Rxa7 bxc5 25. d7 $18
Ne5 26. Rc7 $1 {Threatening Rc8.} Kf8 (26... Kg7 {self-pins the Ne5 and so
loses to} 27. Rc8 $18) 27. Ba3 $1 e3 28. Rc8 Rd6 29. Bxc5 e2 30. Rxd8+ 1-0
merida
46
Author: John Upper
Posted: September 11, 2018, 8:17 pm

 More evidence that over-the-board chess isn't dying as fast as nay-sayers would have it: 31 32 chess tournaments across Canada in September and October 2018. Play in a couple, so you'll have something to tell your grandchildren about...

 


 Labour Day Events

August 31-September 2, 2018

16th Abe Yanofsky Memorial
Lockhart Hall, University of Winnipeg

5-round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30; except rd.1: G/110

https://chess.chessmanitoba.org/?page_id=34

  

September 1-2, 2018

Over/Under 1800
Edmonton Chess Club, Edmonton

2 sections, 5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.albertachess.org/2018OU1800.php


September 1-3, 2018

Paul Hake Labour Day Open
Saint Mary’s University, Halifax

6-round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.nschess.ca/?p=1261


Toronto Open
Annex Chess Club

6-round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://annexchessclub.com/2018-toronto-open/

 

Langley Open
Brookswood Senior Centre, Langley, BC

6 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://langleychess.com/events/langley-open/ 


SEPTEMBER 2018

 

September 7-9, 2018

Championnat Ouvert de Montréal (CHOM)
 Loisirs St-Henri, Montréal

5 rondes, suisse
Cad: 90 + 30

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/regions/clubs/tournoi.php?club=&id=13531


September 8, 2018

New Brunswick Quick Chess Championship
Mt.Allison University (Avard Dixon), Sackville, NB

5 round Swiss
TC: 25 + 10

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/nbqck18.html 

 

Adult Active Open
Tomken Twin Arena, Mississauga

5 Rounds
TC: G/30

info

Mississauga 2019 CYCC Qualifier
Tomken Twin Arena, Mississauga

5 round Swiss
TC: G/30

U8, U10, U12, U14, U16, U18 qualification for 2019 CYCC

http://www.miltonchess.ca/images/mcc/missqual3.pdf

 

2018 Battle of Alberta
Red Deer Baymont Inn & Suites

Annual North vs South Team Match

  • Northerners contact Rafael Arruebarrena
  • Southerners contact Omid Malek

http://www.albertachess.org/2018BOA.html


September 14-16, 2018

RA Fall Open
RA Center, Ottawa

5 round Swiss
TC: 90+30

GM Bator Sambuev is playing

details


September 15, 2018

Regina Open
Riddell Centre, U of R, SASK

5 round Swiss
TC: G/30 + 5

https://www.facebook.com/events/203513740515685/

https://www.facebook.com/QueenCityChessRegina/

 

September 15-16, 2018

Calgary Junior Regional Championship
Calgary Chess Club

Born after January 1, 1999.

  • Sept 15: Open: 5 round Swiss, TC: 90 + 30
  • Sept 16: U1300 & U800: 7 round Swiss, TC 45 + 30

https://www.calgaryjuniorchess.com/CJCC/event/event/9999

 

Edmonton Junior Regional
Edmonton Chess Club

born after Jan 1, 1999

!? - prizes include spot in Alberta Jr. Championship and $100 of professional coaching.

http://www.albertachess.org/2018EJR.php 


September 21-23, 2018

Tournoi Automnal de Sherbrooke

Système suisse de 5 rondes
Détails à venir

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/regions/clubs/evenement.php?club=23&id=13473


September 22-23, 2018

24th Medicine Hat Open

Details: TBA
Org. Dr Bill Taylor

 

September 23, 2018

Chess to Remember
Armenian Community Centre, Willowdale, ON

5 round Swiss
TC: 25 + 5

prevous winners: GM Evgeney Bareev (2x) and GM Avigdor Bykhovsky.

http://homenetmentoronto.com/chess-to-remember/2018/


September 29, 2018 

PEI Quick Chess Open
UPEI (Health Sci Bldg), Charlottetown

5 round swiss
G/40

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/peiqck18.html


2018 Junior Battle of Alberta 
Red Deer Baymont Inn & Suites

First Annual Junior North vs South Team Match

  • Northerners contact Cristian Ivanescu
  • Southerners contact Vlad Rekhson

http://www.albertachess.org/2018JBOA.html


September 30, 2018

PEI Rapid Chess Open
UPEI (Health Sci Bldg), Charlottetown

8 round swiss
G/20

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/peirpd18.html


OCTOBER 2018

October 5-7, 2018

11th Varennes International
l'École secondaire Le Carrefour, Varennes, QC

$20,000 guaranteed
5 round swiss 

https://www.echecsvarennes.com/

 

2018 CYCC Happy Life Markham Open
Bill Hogarth SS, Markham, ON

5 round Swiss
TC: 90+30
includes sections for juniors

https://www.canadachess.ca/markham-open-registration/


October 6-8, 2018

Maritime Open Championship
Saint Mary’s University, Halifax

6 round Swiss
TC: G/2 + 30

http://www.nschess.ca/?p=1265


New West Open 2018
Royal City Centre, New Westminster, BC

6 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

https://westchess.com/tournament/new-west-open-2018


October 13, 2018

2018 Fredericton Fall Tornado
UNB Marshall D'Avray Hall

4 round Swiss
TC: G/60

Org: Jason Manley

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/ftonftor18.html

 

October 13, 2018

Octoberfest Quick Open
Kitchener, ON

TC: G/25 + 10

http://kwchess.org/tournaments-2/


October 13-14, 2018

Almonte Open
Almonte, ON

details available after Sept 17.  :B

https://eoca.ca/


October 19-21, 2018

Newfoundland and Labrador Open
St. John's, NL

5 round Swiss
TC: 30/90 + G/30 + 30

http://nlchess.ca/events/

 

Open d'échecs de Lévis 2018
Patro de Lévis, Lévis, QC

Système suisse de 5 rondes
Cad: 30/75m + 45/mat + 30S

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/regions/clubs/evenement.php?club=56&id=13482

 

October 20-21, 2018

Aurora Fall Open
Newmarket Old Town Hall,  Newmarket, ON

5 round Swiss
TC: 90+30

http://www.aucc.club/2018-aurora-fall-open/2018-aurora-fall-open-details/


October 26-28, 2018

33rd Jack Taylor Memorial
Victoria, BC

5 round Swiss
TC: 90+30

http://victoriachessclub.pbworks.com/w/page/27982406/Jack%20Taylor%20Memorial

 

October 27-28, 2018

Guelph Fall Pro-Am
Guelph Universtiy, Guelph ON

5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

details

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: September 6, 2018, 3:53 am

Our Best of the Web has Machine vs Machine, Man vs Machine, Man vs Man, and Woman vs All Comers. All on chess.com, and all free.


Machine vs Machine: Chess.com Computer Chess Championship

Starts August 31, 2018

For years, TCEC has been the premier computer chess engine competition, but chess.com has started an alternative which might replace it. The three elements needed to make it the #1 computer engine competiton are:

  1. the best engines (this part is easy and cheap)
  2. the strongest hardware (expensive)
  3. a good format, especially the quality of the opening books (!? - needs chess skill and the right combination of transparency and secrecy)

Engines

The engines in the 2018 CCCC are mostly those at the top of the CCRL 40/4 list, including the latest versions of the perennial contenders --- Stockfish, Komodo, and Houdini --- as well as other well and less well known enginges like Fire, Fritz, and "Deep Shredder" (the "deep" means it's still using an old-fashioned sales strategy where they charge extra for multi-core support). Possibly for historical interest, they've included Crafty. CCCC also includes a version of the AlphZero-inspired self-taught neural net program LeelaZero, which will run on very very powerful GPUs. 

Hardware

Chess.com promises that the hardware will be the strongest ever used in a computer chess tournament, and their specs back this:

  • CPUs: 2 x Intel Xeon Platinum 8168 (96 logical cores; 48 per engine with ponder ON)
  • GPUs: four Nvidia Tesla V100 GPUs** 

Compared to the high-end video card GeForce GTX 1080Ti, a Tesla V100 has just over 1000 more CUDA cores and, depending on the task, is between 20% and 800% faster.

**that sounds like an Nvidia DGX workstation: on sale now from Nvidia for only $49,000 US -- you save $20,000 off the regular retail price. Buy now before they're all gone!

Format

The 2018 CCCC runs in three stages:

  1. Stage 1: 24 engines; 2xRR; 15+5; no opening book.
  2. Stage 2: top 8 from stage 1; 10xRR, 15+5; 4-ply book.
  3. Match: top 2 from stage 2; 200 game match;  15+5; opening book of "100 hand-selected opening positions".

The only unknown here is the quality of the opening books, and we'll have to wait for those games to be played to know.

Live Games

https://www.chess.com/computer-chess-championship

https://www.twitch.tv/computerchess

2018 CCCC Info 


Woman vs All Comers: Alexandra Botez 24-hour Twitch Stream

Canadian expert Alexandra Botez doesn't play OTB chess anymore, but she still plays chess: 

  • she does online streaming on Twitch most Thursday nights and some weekends,
  • was a special guest alumna at the 2017 Susan Polgar Foundation Girls Invitational,
  • was the live on-site interviewer at the 2018 PRO Chess League final, where she even got to show off her Chinese.

MissBotez will be running/attempting a 24-hour stream on her Twitch channel on Saturday-Sunday of the 2018 Labour Day weekend. Expect her to be joined by a variety of the chess.com regulars -- Anna Rudolph, Danny Rench, HelmsKnight, and maybe even the Norwegian troll "GMjlh". If you're a chess.com member you might want to challenge her to a game.

Watch
https://www.twitch.tv/alexandrabotez


 Man vs Machine: MVL vs Komodo (odds match)

September 5, 3pm EST on chess.com

Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (FIDE 2779) plays a blitz and handicap rapid match against Komodo, the #2 rated engine in the world. Format:

  • five blitz (5+5) games with MVL as White and Komodo limited in strength and single-threaded.
  • six rapid games (15+2) at odds: positions of varying material and moves to handicap Komodo

Best of all, MVL will play with his webcam on, and will comment on the games as they play: a rare chance to see a top player (try to) explain his thinking in a variety of opening positions he has never seriously studied.

Live
https://www.chess.com/tv 


Man vs Man: Chess.com Speed Chess Championship

There are two matches this week in the chess.com Speed Chess Championship: 

  1. Karjakin - Duda      (Sept 6, 2018: 1pm EST)
  2. Giri - Mamedyarov (Sept. 7, 2018: 1pm EST)

Karjakin is the huge favourite in his match with Duda. The Giri-Mamedyarov game should be a fascinating contrast in styles.

The format for the Chess.com matches is 3 hours of online play, broken into three formats:

  1. 90 minutes of 5+2 blitz, 
  2. 60 minutes of 3+2 blitz,
  3. 30 minutes of 1+1 bullet

For this season they have dropped the one chess960 game in each time control. 

Live Games

chess.com

Twitch 

Author: John Upper
Posted: September 1, 2018, 2:31 am

The 11th Calgary International Chess Classic was held August 14-19, 2018 at the Calgary Chess Club.

The International was a 9-round, 26 (?) player swiss [looks like 24 players with 2 floaters to avoid forced byes], with 3 FMs, no IMs, but 5 GMs: Victor Mikhalevski (ISR), Melikset Khachiyan (USA), Aman Hambleton (CAN), GM Steven Zierk (USA), and Enrico Sevillano (USA).

Prize Winners

GMs Victor Mikhalevski (ISR) and Steven Zierk (USA) tied for 1st with 7.5/9. Both drew with each other, and with GM Khachiyan (who was clear 3rd with 6.5/9), and both defeated GM Aman Hambleton (4th, with 6/9).

Rafael Arruebarrena was top U2400 with 5.5/9, which included draws with GMs Khachiyan and Hambleton.

Ian Zhou was top U2000 with 5/9. He defeated GM Enrico Sevillano in round 6, and had very good chances in his final round game vs Mikhalevski (see game in the player below).

Also notable was the result of 9-year old Anand Chandra, who finished =10th despite losing his last-round game to GM Aman Hambleton. FM Olivier Kenta Chiku-Ratte scored 5/5 against his non-GM opponents, but was 0/4 against the four GMs he did play.


LINKS

homepage
http://www.calgary-international.com/

photos

See the Alberta Chess Association facebook page 

and the Calgary Chess Club facebook page

 


Our Canadian Game of the Week is the last round board 1 game at the 2018 Calgary International between tournament leader GM Victor Mikhalevski (ISR, 2560) and Ian Zhao (CAN, 1981). The diagrams above are from this game, and both are Black to play.

 Going into the final round of the 2018 Calgary International, GM Victor Mikhalevski had the lead with 7/8, a 1/2 point ahead of GM Steven Zierk (USA). They had drawn each other, and both had already played their nearest high-rated competitors, and so both werepaired down: 

  • Zierk got FM Chiku-Ratte, rated 180 lower -- a big gap at the over 2300 level, but no slam dunk. 
  • Mikhalevski however must have thought he'd won the lottery: White, against the untitled Ian Zhao, who he out-rated by 579 points. 

Slam dunk... or "be careful what you wish for"?

..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "11th Calgary International"]
[Site "Calgary Chess Club"]
[Date "2018.08.19"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Mikhalevski, Victor"]
[Black "Zhao, Ian"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C54"]
[WhiteElo "2560"]
[BlackElo "1981"]
[Annotator "Upper,John"]
[PlyCount "149"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4
Bc5 4. d3 Nf6 5. O-O {Mikhalevski has had this position five times, but always
on the black side!?} d6 6. c3 (6. a4 a5 7. c3 Bb6 8. Bb3 Ne7 9. Be3 Bxe3 10.
fxe3 Ng6 11. Nbd2 O-O 12. Qe1 c6 13. Nh4 Nxe4 14. Nxe4 Nxh4 15. Nxd6 Qxd6 16.
Qxh4 Qxd3 17. Qg5 ({Better is} 17. Rxf7 $1 Rxf7 18. Qe7 $16) 17... Be6 18. Bxe6 fxe6
19. Qxe5 Qd5 20. Qd4 $11 {(½-½, 30) Odeev,H (2405)-Mikhalevski,V (2511)
Budapest, 2017.}) 6... h6 (6... a6 7. a4 Ba7 8. Na3 O-O 9. h3 Ne7 10. Nc2 a5
11. Be3 Ng6 12. Bxa7 Rxa7 13. Ne3 c6 {Nisipeanu,L (2686)-Mikhalevski,V (2520)
Zalakaros 2017 (½-½, 46).}) 7. Nbd2 O-O 8. b4 (8. h3 Re8 9. Re1 a5 10. Nf1
Ba7 11. Ng3 Be6 12. Bb5 Bd7 13. Ba4 Ne7 14. Bc2 Ng6 {McShane,L (2669)-Adams,M 
(2706) British Ch. blitz playoff 2018 (0-1, 37)}) 8... Bb6 9. Bb3 a6 10. a4 Re8
(10... Be6 11. Bxe6 fxe6 12. Nc4 Ba7 13. Qb3 Qe8 14. Be3 Bxe3 15. Nxe3 Nh5 16.
Nh4 g5 17. Nhf5 Kh7 18. Ng3 Nf4 {Rapport,R (2707)-Safarli,E (2639) World Rapid,
Riadh 2017 (½-½, 54).}) ({Here's an interesting suggestion:} 10... d5 11.
exd5 Nxd5 12. Ne4 Re8 13. a5 Ba7 14. Bxh6 $5) 11. Nc4 Ba7 12. Re1 Be6 13. b5
Ne7 ({I'm not sure, but it looks like both players either missed or
misevaluated this:} 13... axb5 14. axb5 Bxf2+ $1 15. Kxf2 Rxa1 16. bxc6 bxc6
$15 {here Black has Rpp for the B and N, and that big clump of center pawns
will make it hard for White to find good squares for his Ns.} {Critically,} 17.
Na3 $2 {doesn't trap the Ra1, since} Rxc1 18. Qxc1 Bxb3 $19 {simply wins for
Black.}) 14. Rb1 $6 {preparing the pawn sac to come, but White is too slow to
take advantage of it.} axb5 15. axb5 Ng6 16. b6 cxb6 17. Ba4 (17. Ne3 $5) 17...
Re7 18. Bb5 (18. Be3 Bxc4 19. dxc4 Nxe4 $17) 18... Bb8 $15 19. Ncd2 (19. Ne3 d5
$1 {anyway.}) 19... d5 $1 $17 {Activating the Bb8 --- Black's much rerouted
"Lopez Bishop".} 20. c4 d4 $1 21. Nf1 Bd6 22. Ng3 Qc8 23. h3 {[#] The kind of
move I'm sure a lot of us make with a little trepedation -- in online blitz
games -- but surely there's no way Black will sac here in a tournament game
against a GM...} Bxh3 $5 {My computer rates this as a clear mistake, turning
Black's clear advantage into equality... but it doesn't have anything to say
about the psychological effect of this move.} (23... Nh7 $5) (23... Bc5 $17 {
and either way Black is up a pawn, but it is the one way back on b7.}) 24. gxh3
Qxh3 25. Qe2 Nf4 26. Qf1 (26. Bxf4 {gives Black the chance to force a draw,
and White several ways to lose quickly} exf4 27. Nf5 (27. Qf1 $4 Qg4 $19) 27...
Qg4+ 28. Kh2 (28. Kh1 $4 Ra2 $3 $19) 28... Qh5+ 29. Kg2 (29. N5h4 g5 $17) 29...
Qg4+ 30. Kf1 Qh3+ $11) 26... Qg4 (26... Qxf1+ 27. Kxf1 $1 Nxd3 28. c5 Nxc5 {only move.} (
28... Nxe1 29. cxd6 Nxf3 30. dxe7) 29. Nf5 Re6 30. Bc4 $14) 27. Nh2 Qg5 28. Kh1
g6 {Preventing Nf5 and preparing ...Qh4 and ...Ng4.} 29. Ne2 Ra2 $2 ({Both} 
29... Qh5 {and}) (29... Qh4 {stopping White's 31st are good, after which White
will not be able to take on f4 without handing Black a very strong KID-style
dark-square attack.}) 30. Bxf4 exf4 {threatening ...f3-+.} 31. Qh3 $1 $16 {
Stops Black from improving his Q, and eyes c8.} Kh7 32. Ra1 Rb2 33. Ra8 $2 {
This threatens Qc8, with a winning counter attack, but Black can trade Qs and
keep an advantage with his active pieces (and extra pawns) so this turns out
to be a serious waste of time.} Qh5 $1 34. Qxh5 (34. Qc8 {looks menacing (it THREATENS MATE!!), but Black can defend with ...Re8 or
even ...g5!} Re8 35. Qxb7 {saving the Q and attacking f7.} (35. Bxe8 $2 f3 $19)
35... Re7 36. Qc8 {only move.} (36. Qxb6 Ng4 $19) 36... Re8 37. Qb7 $11) 34... Nxh5 {[#]}
35. Nxd4 $2 {Opening the c5-g1 diagonal is serious mistake, giving Black an
overwhelming attack.} ({Better is} 35. Raa1) 35... Rxf2 $2 ({Better is} 35... Bc5 $19 36.
Ndf3 (36. Nhf3 Rxf2 $19) (36. Re2 Bxd4 $19) 36... Bxf2 37. Rea1 Be3 $19) 36.
Ndf3 Rb2 (36... Bb4 37. Rd1 f5 $5 38. e5 g5 {the computer prefers Black, but
this could go either way, and the player who keeps his nerves in time trouble
will probably win.}) 37. Raa1 Ng3+ 38. Kg1 Ne2+ 39. Kf1 $2 ({Better is} 39. Rxe2 {as Mikhalevski plays later.})
39... Ng3+ ({Better is} 39... Rxe4 $3 {winning, since White can't survive if he can't
block the c5-g1 diagonal.} 40. dxe4 $2 Ng3+ 41. Kg1 Bc5+ $19 {it's #2.}) 40.
Kg1 Ne2+ 41. Rxe2 Rxe2 42. Ng4 Kg7 43. Kf1 Rb2 (43... f5 $3 {a stong computer
move: the exchange sac leaves White staring at a wall of Black pawns, and the
"Bishop" on b5 is a distant and useless spectator.} 44. Kxe2 fxg4 45. Nd2 (45.
Nd4 Be5 $19) (45. Nh2 h5 $19) 45... Bc5 $17) 44. e5 Bc5 45. d4 $1 h5 46. Nf2 (
46. Nf6 $1 Rb3 (46... Bxd4 $5 47. Nxd4 Rxe5 48. Nd5 g5 $13) 47. Kg2 Rxf3 $1 48.
Kxf3 Bxd4 $15) 46... Rb3 $1 47. Nd2 Rxb5 $1 48. cxb5 Bxd4 $17 49. Ra4 Bxe5 50.
Nh3 Re6 (50... f6 51. Nxf4 Rd7 52. Nf3 Bxf4 53. Rxf4 g5 $17) 51. Nf3 (51. Nxf4
$4 Rf6 $19) 51... Bd6 52. Rd4 f6 53. Nxf4 Bxf4 54. Rxf4 Rd6 55. Re4 Rd5 56.
Re7+ Kh6 57. Re6 Rxb5 {[#]} 58. Rxf6 $2 (58. Kg2 $1) 58... Rf5 $1 59. Rxf5 {only move.}
gxf5 {This position is winning for Black -- mate in 33, according to the
7-piece Lomonosov tablebases -- but there is no margin for error. Mikhalevski
defends perfectly, and Zhao makes one hard-to-see-but-critical error.} 60. Ke2
Kg6 61. Ke3 {If it was White to move here, then Kf4 would be a draw.} b5 $1 62.
Kf4 b4 $1 63. Nd4 Kf6 64. Nb3 b6 (64... h4 $1) 65. Nd4 h4 66. Kf3 Ke5 (66... b5
) 67. Nc6+ Kd5 68. Nxb4+ Kc4 $2 (68... Kc5 {only move.} 69. Nc2 (69. Nd3+ Kd4 {only move.} $19)
69... b5 70. Ne3 {wins the f-pawn, but doesn't gain a tempo on the K.} b4 71.
Nd1 (71. Nxf5 b3 $19) 71... Kd4 72. Kg2 f4 $19) 69. Nc2 $11 (69. Nc6 $11 Kc5
70. Ne7 {only move.} b5 71. Nxf5 {only move.} b4 72. Ne3 {only move.} $11) 69... b5 70. Ne3+ {only move.} Kd3 71. Nxf5
b4 72. Ne3 h3 73. Nd1 {only move.} Kc2 74. Ne3+ {only move.} Kd2 75. Nc4+ {The N on its own can
stop/sacrifice itself for the b-pawn while the white K catches the h-pawn.}
1/2-1/2
merida
46

..

Tags:

Author: John Upper
Posted: August 20, 2018, 3:55 am

The Canadian Junior Chess Championship ran August 8-12, 2018 at Humber College, Toronto.

It featured four sections:

  • a 10-player invitiational RR, where the top male and female win the right to represent Canada at the World Junior in Turkey (Sept 4-16), and get $1500 for travel,
  • Open Swiss (25 players, 9-round swiss),
  • U1800 (40 players, 9-round swiss),
  • U1300 (70 players, 6-round swiss). 

Winners:
FM Shawn Rodrigue-Lemieux won the Invitational after a 4-game rapid and blitz playoff over FM Mark Plotkin; both finished with 7/9.
Sherry Tian was top girl with 3.5/9. 

Open:
Jeffrey Xu lost his first game, but scored 7.5/8 to win the Open section. Harry Zhou lost to Jeffrey, but scored 6.5/8 in his other games to finish clear second.

U1800:
Mao Fengxi and Ahmed Syed Ibrahim tied for 1st with 7/9, and Ibrahim winning the rapid playoff 1.5/2. Michelle Hua was top girl with 5.5/9.

U1300:
Harry Xue won with 5.5/6. Ethan Lin and Alina Chen tied for second with 5/6, with Alina finishing as top girl.

Congratiulations to the winners, and thanks to the organizers: Mikhail Egorov and Gary Hua.


Invitational Section final Crosstable (via chess-results.com)
Rk.  Title Name Rtg 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Pts. 
1 FM Rodrigue-Lemieux Shawn  2352 * 0 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 7
2 FM Plotkin Mark  2332 1 * 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 7
3 FM Vettese Nicholas  2329 ½ 0 * 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 6.5
4 CM Liang Hairan  2286 0 ½ 0 * 1 1 1 1 1 1 6.5
5 FM Hua Eugene  2446 0 ½ 1 0 * 1 ½ 1 1 1 6
6   Nasir Zehn  2306 0 ½ 0 0 0 * ½ 1 1 1 4
7   Tian Shi Yuan (sherry)  2028 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ * 0 ½ 1 3.5
8   Zhu Brandon  2149 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 * ½ 1 2.5
9 WFM Qiao Cindy  2016 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ * 1 2
10 WFM Wang Constance  2044 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 0
Author: John Upper
Posted: August 14, 2018, 6:27 pm

Our Best of the Web includes the 2018 Canadian Junior, the preliminary rounds of the world's top computer chess engine tournament, and a rapid and blitz tournament featuring 9 of the world's top 14 players.... as well as two games!

The diagram comes from the round 2 game bewteen Hiran Liang and Brandon Zhu at the 2018 Canadian Junior Chess Championship. White to play (solution(s) in game viewer below).

The second game in the viewer is Leela Zero's smooth win in the TCEC Division 4 RR.

 


2018 Canadian Junior Championship

The Canadian Junior Chess Championship runs August 8-12, 2018 at Humber College, Toronto. 

It features four sections: a 10-player invitiational RR, Open Swiss, U1800, and U1300. Male and female winners of the 10-player RR represent Canada at the World Junior in Turkey (Sept 4-16), and get $1500 for travel.

The diagram at the top of the page comes from the round 2 game bewteen Hiran Liang and Brandon Zhu at the Canadian Junior. White to play (solution(s) in game viewer below).

homepage
https://elevatemychess.com/canadian-junior-chess-championship/

live games (top 3 boards in Invitational Section)
http://view.livechesscloud.com/a3a3c64b-2331-456c-af1b-6761974d5b15

Standings
http://chess-results.com/tnr370772.aspx?lan=1&art=0


TCEC Season 13

The only chess engine competition that matters is underway. It features 32 chess engines competing on identical hardware (almost, see below) with identical short opening books. The top engines, including the perennial top 3 Stockfish, Komodo, and Houdini -- are all seeded directly into the Premier Division. Other engines have to qualify via round-robins from one of the four lower divisions, which compete in 4xRRs with a TC of 30 minutes + 10 seconds per game.

This year the hardware cannot be identical, since, for the first time Neural Net engines will be in the competition. Neural Nets are highly parallelized programs, and are typically run on specialized hardware, or on the GPUs in high-end graphics cards. For Season 13, standard chess engines will run on a 44 core CPU, while the two Neural Net engines run on a remote machine with 2x GTX 1080ti GPUs.

Leela

An online group of programmers and chess enthusiasts is attempting to reproduce the  success of Google's AlphaZero by creating an open-source self-taught neural net program, called Leela Zero (L0), based (to the extent possible on the limited informtion released by Google Mind) on what is know about AlphaZero. 

Leela uses distributed processing (including free processing time via Google Colab) to create millions of self-play games, asesses positions based on their winning probability as shown by Monte Carlo Tree Searches, and revises itself constantly, with a newer version being posted on their site approximately every 8 hours. 

Leela's progress has been almost constant -- there were setbacks, e.g. when the programmers found errors in the 50-move rule implementation -- but uneven: Leela frequently played wonderful chess, only to allow a mate-in-three! This is because, unlike the typical alpha-beta engines, Leela doesn't analyze all possible moves at a short distance (and so misses some tactics). This uneven progress has revealed a split among Leela's supporters: the ones I'll call the "science types" think of Leela as an experiment to test the ideas revealed by the AlphaZero developers, while the "chess nuts" want Leela to get better faster, and think the undirected self-play method used by AZ and L0 could be sped up by training it on tactics and table-base positions. 

A result of this split is that there was some controversy when a second NN engine was added to the tournament, DeusX, which turns out to be a derivative of Leela, using some guided training chosen by Albert Silver.

As it turns out, both Leela and DeusX qualified from the Division 4 group and move a step closer to the Premier Division:

TCEC 13: Division 4 Results

  1.  LCZero 20/28(+14 =12 -2)
  2.  DeusX 1.0   18.5(+13 =11 -4)
  3.  Wasp 3.2       18.0(+11 =17 -2)
  4.  Rodent III12.5(+4 =17 -7)
  5.  Senpai 2.012.5(+3 =19 -6)
  6.  Chess22k 1.1011
  7.  Tucano 7.0510
  8.  Ivanhoe 999946h 9.5

With new versions of Leela released every day, the next round-robin might feature a significantly stronger version: the current Leela Network seems to be approximately 50 Elo points stronger than the one that entered TCEC last week. All developers are able to update their engines each time they advance to the next level, with the caveat that any glitches introduced by the newer version cannot be fixed or replaced once that round-robin has begun. 

The game viewer below shows one of Leela's wins. It is a remarkable example of spatial control, as well as a move (Bxa7, that almost all humans would automatically discount).


TCEC
http://www.chessdom.com/tcec-season-13-the-advance-of-the-nns/

live games (games run 24/7)
http://tcec.chessdom.com/season13/live.php

Leela 
http://lczero.org/


St.Louis Rapid & Blitz

The third stage in the 2018 Grand Chess Tour hits St.Louis August 11-15, 2018. It features two tournaments back-to-back:

  • Rapid: a round robin played at 25 min + a 10 second delay.
  • Blitz: a double round-robin at 5 min + 3 sec delay.

Players, by FIDE world ranking, are: 

    • 2. Caruana
    • 3. Mamedyarov
    • 6. So
    • 8. MVL 
    • 9. Nakamura
    • 10. Karjakin
    • 12. Anand
    • 13. Aronian
    • 14. Grischuk
    • 25. Lenier Dominguez

No Magnus? No worries: he bumps out Dominguez and joins the others to play in the Sinquefield Cup: August 18-28, 2018.

live games

StLCC (Seirawan, Ashley, etc.)
https://grandchesstour.org/2018-grand-chess-tour/2018-saint-louis-rapid-blitz

GMs Hansen and Hambleton
https://www.twitch.tv/chessbrah


Click the arrow button next to the players' names to choose game:
..
() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "TCEC Season 13 - Division 4"]
[Site "http://tcec.chessdom.com"]
[Date "2018.08.08"]
[Round "25.3"]
[White "LCZero 16.10161"]
[Black "Chess22k 1.10"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B56"]
[WhiteElo "3219"]
[BlackElo "3072"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "144"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. f3 e5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. Be3
O-O 9. Qd2 a5 10. Bb5 Na7 {[#]There are over 300 human-played games in
MegaBase from here -- many featuring top-level players -- almost all of which
have continued by retreating the Bb5 to either d3 or e2.} 11. Bxa7 $5 {When I
first saw it I thought this was a bad move -- giving up the DSB looks
completely anti-positional -- but the move has its positonal pluses too:  1)
keeping control over b5 means Black can get play against White's K after 000
only by playing an exchange sac on c3, which is expensive; 2) Black won't be
able to force through ...d5, so the only square his minor pieces might look to
use is c5, and they can't all use it.} (11. Be2 Nc6 12. a3 a4 13. Nc1 Be6 14.
Nd5 Bxd5 $1 15. exd5 Nd4 16. Bxd4 exd4 17. Qxd4 Qa5+ 18. Qd2 Qb6 $5 (18... Nxd5
$15) 19. c4 Nd7 20. Nd3 Nc5 (20... Bf6 $142) 21. Nxc5 Qxc5 $11 22. Qb4 Qe3 23.
Qd2 Qc5 24. Qb4 Qe3 25. Qd2 {½-½ Piorun,K (2655)-Hracek,Z (2599) Jurmala,
2016.}) (11. Ba4 $6 {(the actual game had 11.Be2 Nc6 12.Bb5 Na7 inserted)} Be6
12. Bxa7 Rxa7 13. Qf2 Ra8 14. O-O-O Qb8 $15 15. Bb5 $2 Rc8 (15... a4 $1) 16.
Na4 (16. a4 $5 Rxc3 $5) 16... d5 17. Nb6 a4 $1 18. Bxa4 Qa7 $1 $19 19. exd5 Bd8
(19... Nxd5 $1) 20. dxe6 Bxb6 21. exf7+ Kxf7 22. Nc5 Qxa4 {0-1 Anand,V (2781)
-Kramnik,V (2751) Monte Carlo (blindfold), 1999.}) 11... Rxa7 12. O-O-O Qb6 13.
a4 {At 26 ply, Stockfish 9 rates this position as 0.00} Ra8 (13... Be6 14. Kb1
Rd8 15. g4 Raa8 16. g5 Nh5 17. h4 Nf4 18. Nd5 Nxd5 19. exd5 Bd7 20. Bxd7 (20.
c4 $5) 20... Rxd7 21. Rhe1 Qa6 22. Re4 f5 23. gxf6 Bxf6 24. c4 $14 {0-1 (54)
Tomczak,J (2596)-Czarnota,P (2557) Warsaw 2017}) 14. Qe2 Be6 15. Nd2 Rfc8 16.
Nc4 Qc5 17. Ne3 Rc7 18. Ned5 (18. g4 $5) 18... Nxd5 19. Nxd5 Bxd5 20. Rxd5 Qb4
21. Kb1 Rac8 22. c4 Rc5 23. Rd3 $1 R5c7 24. g3 Kf8 {Black has nothing
constructive to do, while White can triple on the d-file and/or prepare to
open a file with f3-f4. Any file opening on the kingside will doubly benefit
White, who has more space to swing major pieces that way, and because Black's
K will be a target.} 25. Qc2 Kg8 26. Rb3 Qc5 27. Qg2 Bg5 28. Re1 Rd8 29. h4 Bh6
30. Ra3 {I don't know if I would have to be a better or a worse player to
understand this move. It doesn't LOOK like zugzwang....} Qd4 31. Qf1 Qc5 32.
Rd3 Qb6 {[#]} 33. f4 $1 exf4 34. gxf4 (34. g4 $2 g5) 34... Rcc8 35. h5 Qc7 36.
Qf3 Qe7 37. Red1 Qh4 38. e5 $1 dxe5 39. Qg4 $1 {remember Adams - Torre? Leela
doesn't.} Qe7 (39... Qxg4 $4 40. Rxd8+ Rxd8 41. Rxd8#) 40. fxe5 Rf8 (40... Rxd3
$4 41. Qxc8+ $18) 41. Rd5 Rc7 42. Qe4 Rc5 43. Re1 b6 44. Rd7 Qe6 45. Rd6 Qh3
46. Bc6 {Continuing to dominate the Bh6. Leela's piece coordination to control
space is just teriffic.} (46. Rxb6 Bd2 47. Re2 Qf1+ 48. Ka2 Bb4 49. h6 $18)
46... Qxh5 47. Bd5 Rc7 (47... Bd2 $2 48. Rh1 $18) 48. e6 fxe6 49. Rxe6 $18 Kh8
50. Rxb6 Rcc8 51. Rh1 Qg5 52. Qd4 Rf4 53. Qc3 Qf5+ 54. Ka2 Bg5 55. Be6 Qf6 56.
Qxa5 Rd8 57. Qb5 Qe7 58. Bd5 Rf2 59. Rb7 Qd6 60. Be4 Bh6 61. Qb6 Qxb6 62. Rxb6
Re2 63. Bd5 Bd2 64. Rb5 h6 65. a5 Rd7 66. a6 Ra7 67. Bb7 Bf4 68. c5 Re6 69. Kb3
Kh7 70. Rb6 Re2 71. Kc4 Bc7 72. b4 Bf4 {game was adjudicated a win for White
based on the TCEC win rules.} 1-0

[Event "Canadian Junior"]
[Site "Humber College"]
[Date "2018.08.09"]
[Round "2.1"]
[White "Liang, Hairan"]
[Black "Zhu, Brandon"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B11"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "49"]

1. e4 c6 2. Nf3 d5 3. Nc3 Bg4 4. h3 Bxf3 5. Qxf3 e6 6. Be2 Nf6 7. O-O Be7 8.
Rd1 O-O (8... b5 $2 9. e5 Nfd7 10. d4 a6 11. Nb1 $5 (11. Qg3 {White attacks
before Black gets play against d4.}) 11... c5 12. c3 Nc6 13. Qg4 g6 14. Bh6 $14
{(1-0, 36) Vachier Lagrave,M (2796)-Topalov,V (2749) Paris (blitz) 2017.}) 9.
d4 Kh8 $6 (9... Nbd7 10. Be3 dxe4 11. Nxe4 Nxe4 12. Qxe4 Nf6 13. Qf3 Nd5 14.
Bd2 Bf6 15. c3 Qb6 16. Rab1 Rfd8 17. Bd3 $14 {½-½ (41) Trifunovic,P-Filip,M
Oberhausen, 1961.}) 10. a3 a5 11. Rb1 a4 12. Be3 b5 13. Bd3 Qa5 $2 (13... dxe4
$142 14. Nxe4) 14. e5 $1 $16 Ng8 15. Ne2 g6 16. h4 $1 Bxh4 (16... h5 17. Nf4 {
and White sacs a piece on one of the light squares.}) 17. g3 $18 Be7 18. Kg2
Qd8 19. Rh1 Bg5 20. Nf4 (20. Qg4 {also wins} Bxe3 21. fxe3 Nd7 22. Rxh7+ Kxh7
23. Rh1+ Kg7 24. Nf4 Qe7 (24... Re8 25. Bxg6 $18) 25. Nh5+) 20... Kg7 {Black
has expanded on the queenside, but White has 5 of his 6 pieces attacking
Black's K.} (20... Ra7 21. Bxg6 (21. Rxh7+ $1 {also wins.}) 21... fxg6 22.
Nxg6+ Kg7 23. Nxf8 Rf7 24. Rxh7+ $4) 21. Nxe6+ $1 {White is spoiled for choice,
as all plausible sacs win:} (21. Rxh7+ {also wins} Kxh7 22. Nxg6 Nh6 23. Ne7+
Kh8 24. Bxg5 $18) (21. Bxg6 $1 {also wins} hxg6 (21... Bxf4 22. Rxh7+ Kxg6 23.
Qh5#) (21... fxg6 22. Nxe6+ Kh8 23. Nxf8 $18 (23. Rxh7+ $18)) 22. Nh5+ $1 gxh5
23. Qxh5 $18) 21... fxe6 22. Rxh7+ $1 Kxh7 23. Qh5+ Bh6 24. Qxg6+ Kh8 25. Qh7#
1-0
merida
46
..
Author: John Upper
Posted: August 9, 2018, 9:46 pm

28 chess events across Canada in August and September 2018. Choose wisely...


AUGUST 2018

 

 

August 3-6, 2018

Kitchener Chess Festival
Kitchener City Hall, Kitchener ON

13th annual Festival includes multiple events: 6-round Swiss, 60+ Seniors Section, Team Prizes, Family Prizes, Blitz Tournament, daily BBQ.

http://www.chessfest.ca/

 

Canadian Senior Championship
Calgary Chess Club

  • 7-round Swiss in two sections: 50+ and 65+.
  • Must be at least 50 or at least 65 by December 31, 2018.
  • Canadian citizens or residents only.
  • Maximum 40 players

 

http://albertachess.org/2018CSC.php


August 4, 2018

New Brunswick Day Tornado
University of New Brunswick, Fredericton

4 round Swiss
TC: g/60

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/nbdayftontor18.html

 

August 4-6, 2018

2nd Semiahmoo Open
Pacific Inn Resort, Surrey BC

6-round Swiss (BC long weekend)
TC: 90 + 30

http://semiahmooopen.pbworks.com/w/page/117147288/FrontPage


August 7, 2018

Manitoba Active
University of Winnipeg

  • 4 round Swiss
  • TC: 20 + 10
  • CFC membership not required

https://chess.chessmanitoba.org/?page_id=34

 


 August 8-12, 2018

Canadian Junior Championship
Humber College, Toronto

Sections: 10-player invitiational RR, Open Swiss, U1800, U1300
TC: 90 + 30

Winners of the 10-player RR represent Canada at the World Junior in Turkey (Sept 4-16), and get $1500 travel.

https://elevatemychess.com/canadian-junior-chess-championship/

 

 

 

August 12

Bowser Builders Open
Bowser Legion Hall, Vancouver Island

4 rounds
TC: 45 + 5

http://bowserchess.pbworks.com/w/page/123435870/10th%20Bowser%20Builders%20Open%20Chess%20Tournament

 



August 14-19, 2018

11th Calgary International Chess Classic
Calgary Chess Club

Features: GMs Victor Mikhalevski (ISR), Melikset Khachiyan (USA), Aman Hambleton (CAN), Enrico Sevillano (USA)

Includes: Blitz Championship (Aug 19)

http://www.calgary-international.com/

 live games
http://live.followchess.com/#!11th-calgary-international-2018

 

August 18

Brantford Olympiad Waive
Harmony Square (Bell Stage), Brantford ON

5 round Swiss
TC: 25 + 5

$20 From each Entry to the Olympiad Team 

http://www.miltonchess.ca/images/cfc/2018_brantford_olympiad_waive_open.pdf


August 18-19, 2018

2nd Smiths Falls Open
Smiths Falls Lions Club, Smiths Falls ON

5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.miltonchess.ca/images/cfc/2018_smith_falls_open.pdf


August 25-26, 2018

Hamilton Summer Open
Emmanuel United Church, Hamilton

5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://chesshamilton.mygamesonline.org/news.php

  

August 26, 2018

FAAAR Rapid Chess
Sheraton Airport, Toronto

5 round Swiss; unrated
TC: G/30

http://chess.faaar2018.com


Labour Day Events


August 31-September 2, 2018

16th Abe Yanofsky Memorial
Lockhart Hall, University of Winnipeg

5-round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30; except rd.1: G/110

https://chess.chessmanitoba.org/?page_id=34

 

 

September 1-2, 2018

Over/Under 1800
Edmonton Chess Club, Edmonton

2 sections, 5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.albertachess.org/2018OU1800.php


September 1-3, 2018

Paul Hake Labour Day Open
Saint Mary’s University, Halifax

6-round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.nschess.ca/?p=1261


Toronto Open
Annex Chess Club

6-round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://annexchessclub.com/2018-toronto-open/

 

Langley Open
Brookswood Senior Centre, Langley, BC

6 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://langleychess.com/events/langley-open/

 


SEPTEMBER 2018

 

September 7-9, 2018

Championnat Ouvert de Montréal (CHOM)
 Loisirs St-Henri, Montréal

5 rondes, suisse
Cad: 90 + 30

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/regions/clubs/tournoi.php?club=&id=13531


September 8

New Brunswick Quick Chess Championship
Mt.Allison University (Avard Dixon), Sackville, NB

5 round Swiss
TC: 25 + 10

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/nbqck18.html


Mississauga 2019 CYCC Qualifier
Tomken Twin Arena Auditorium, Mississauga ON

5 round Swiss
TC: G/30

U8, U10, U12, U14, U16, U18 qualification for 2019 CYCC

http://www.miltonchess.ca/images/mcc/missqual3.pdf

 

2018 Battle of Alberta
Red Deer Baymont Inn & Suites

Annual North vs South Team Match

  • Northerners contact Rafael Arruebarrena
  • Southerners contact Omid Malek

http://www.albertachess.org/2018BOA.html



September 15-16, 2018


September Fall Open
Kitchener, ON

5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://kwchess.org/tournaments-2/

 

Calgary Junior Regional Championship
Calgary Chess Club

Born after January 1, 1999.

  • Sept 15: Open: 5 round Swiss, TC: 90 + 30
  • Sept 16: U1300 & U800: 7 round Swiss, TC 45 + 30

https://www.calgaryjuniorchess.com/CJCC/event/event/9999



September 21-23, 2018

Tournoi Automnal de Sherbrooke

Système suisse de 5 rondes
Détails à venir

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/regions/clubs/evenement.php?club=23&id=13473


September 22-23

24th Medicine Hat Open

Details: TBA

 

September 23

Chess to Remember
Armenian Community Centre, Willowdale, ON

5 round Swiss
TC: 25 + 5

prevous winners: GM Evgeney Bareev (2x) and GM Avigdor Bykhovsky.

http://homenetmentoronto.com/chess-to-remember/2018/


September 29, 2018 

PEI Quick Chess Open
UPEI (Health Sci Bldg), Charlottetown

5 round swiss
G/40

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/peiqck18.html


2018 Junior Battle of Alberta 
Red Deer Baymont Inn & Suites

First Annual Junior North vs South Team Match

  • Northerners contact Cristian Ivanescu
  • Southerners contact Vlad Rekhson

http://www.albertachess.org/2018JBOA.html


September 30

PEI Rapid Chess Open
UPEI (Health Sci Bldg), Charlottetown

8 round swiss
G/20

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/peirpd18.html



October 5-7, 2018

11th Varennes International

l'École secondaire Le Carrefour, Varennes, QC

$20,000 guaranteed
5 round swiss

 

https://www.echecsvarennes.com/

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: August 6, 2018, 10:37 pm

The 2018 Québec Open was held July 21-28, 2018, at the Sandman Hotel in Longueuil, Québec, just across the river from Montréal.

It was a 9-round Swiss, with one round per day, except Sunday July 22 with rounds 2 and 3.

It had a prize fund of $15,000 and attracted 175 players in five sections, with Open section topped by six GMs: Romain Edouard (FRA), Victor Mikhalevski (ISR), Alexandre Le Siege (CAN), Bator Sambuev (CAN), Razvan Preotu (CAN), and Alexander Cherniaev (RUS).

GM Razvan Preotu (CAN) won with an undefeated 7.5/9, including wins over 2nd and 4th place GMs Edouard and Mikhalevski. GM Romain Edouard (FRA) was second with 7/9. GMs Bator Sambuev (CAN) recovered from a stretch of 0.5/3 to win his last four games to tie with GM Victor Mikhalevski (ISR) for =3rd-4th with 6.5.

Open Section Results: (via Chess-Results.com)

Rk.   Name FED 1.Rd 2.Rd 3.Rd 4.Rd 5.Rd 6.Rd 7.Rd 8.Rd 9.Rd Pts. 
1 GM Preotu Razvan CAN  38w1  20b1   4w1   2w1   8b½   5b½   6w1   7b½  10w1 7.5
2 GM Edouard Romain FRA  34w1  39b1   7w1   1b0  10w1   8b½   5w1   4w½  11b1 7
3 GM Sambuev Bator CAN  48b1  21w1  40b0  20w0  25b½  36w1  26b1   8w1  15w1 6.5
4 GM Mikhalevski Victor ISR  25b1  29w1   1b0   6w½  36b1  11w1  20w1   2b½   5w½ 6.5
5 FM Chiku-Ratte Olivier-Kenta CAN  17b1   9w1   8b0  31w1  29b1   1w½   2b0  12w1   4b½ 6
6   Zhao Jim CAN  43b1   8w0  25b1   4b½  21w1  39w1   1b0  24b½  16w1 6
7 GM Cherniaev Alexander RUS  30b1  31w1   2b0  15w1  11b½  10b½  23w1   1w½   8b½ 6
8 GM Le Siege Alexandre CAN  16w1   6b1   5w1  40b½   1w½   2w½  13b1   3b0   7w½ 6
9   Malek Omid CAN  44w1   5b0  39w0  42b1  28b1  33w1  11b0  14w½  24w1 5.5
10 IM Kaufman Raymond USA  23w½  22b1  36b1  26w1   2b0   7w½  12b½  13w1   1b0 5.5
11 FM Voskanyan Vahagn CAN  32b1    -½  24w1  23b½   7w½   4b0   9w1  20b1   2w0 5.5
12   Bremner William CAN  18w½  23b0  35w1  19b½  44w1  22b1  10w½   5b0  21w1 5.5
13 NM Beaulieu Eric CAN  47w½    -½  30b½  32w1  26b1  24b1   8w0  10b0  23w1 5.5
14  NM Upper John CAN  24b0    -½  44w0  35b1  18w½  48w1  31b1   9b½  20w1 5.5
Section Winners
  • U2000: David Craciun 7/9
  • U1800: Victor Morin-Pare 8.5/9 
  • U1600: Jean-Guy Bergeron 7/9 
  • U1400: Martin Laroche 7.5/9

 

Other Winners

William Bremner was the big rating winner at the Quebec Open, where he earned 155 FIDE rating points! Add that to the 62 points he got in the U18 section at the CYCC  (where he tied for 1st), and the 91 points from the U2000 section at the Canadian Open (which he won with +7 =2 -0), and William finishes an awesome July in Quebec by earning a total of 307.8 FIDE Rating points!

FM GV Sai Krishna, Indian federation but playing out of Montreal, registered for only the first four rounds before he had to head out of town, but in those four games scored +3 =1 -0, including a win against GM Sambuev and a draw vs GM Le Siege. That score earned him 21 FIDE rating point so push his rating over 2400 and that combines with earlier IM Norms is enough for him to become an IM!


Links

2018 CoQ Homepage

photos
see Album on Chess Canada facebook page

Final Standings on Chess-Results

Author: John Upper
Posted: August 2, 2018, 8:32 pm