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The 2018 Croatian Women’s Championship is 9-round Swiss tournament taking place in Zagreb, Croatia from 23-29 May. The time control is 90 minutes for 40 moves followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, with a 30-second increment from move 1. Live game with analysis will be provided daily with the best chess [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: May 23, 2018, 5:40 pm
The Mongolian Women’s Championship is a 12-player round-robin tournament taking place from 19-27 May 2018 in Arkhangai, Mongolia. Players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one. Live game with analysis will be provided daily with the best chess [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: May 22, 2018, 5:55 am
The Mongolian Championship is a 12-player round-robin tournament taking place from 19-27 May 2018 in Arkhangai, Mongolia. Players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one. Live game with analysis will be provided daily with the best chess software [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: May 22, 2018, 5:49 am
The 2018 Summer Chess Classic is a 10-player round-robin tournament taking place from 15-23 May in the St. Louis Chess Club, USA. Players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, with a 30-second increment starting from move one. No draw offers are allowed before move 30. [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: May 9, 2018, 7:17 am
The 2018 Summer Chess Classic is a 10-player round-robin tournament taking place from 15-23 May in the St. Louis Chess Club, USA. Players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, with a 30-second increment starting from move one. No draw offers are allowed before move 30. [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: May 9, 2018, 7:11 am
The 2018 Romanian Championship is a 9-round Swiss tournament taking place from 14-22 May in Băile Olănești. Players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one. Live game with analysis will be provided daily with the best chess software [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: May 6, 2018, 5:51 pm
The 3rd Kolkata International Grandmaster Open Chess Tournament will be held from 14 to 22 May in Kolkata. Venue will be The New Town School. Tournament is organised by Dibyendu Barua and Allsport Foundation. System of Play: The tournament will be conducted as per FIDE Laws of Chess and FIDE Swiss System with 9 rounds. [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: May 6, 2018, 11:57 am
The 2018 Romanian Women’s Championship is a 9-round Swiss tournament taking place from 14-22 May in Băile Olănești. Players receive 90 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes to the end of the game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one. Live game with analysis will be provided daily with the best chess [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: May 6, 2018, 6:31 am
The “Tournament of the Champions” is a 10-player round-robin tournament taking place from 14-21 May 2018 in Pleven, Bulgaria. Players receive 90 minutes for the entire game, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one. Organizer is Interparliamentary Assembly on Orthodoxy. Hotel “Rostov” Pleven. Under the auspices of the Ombudsman of the Republic of Bulgaria [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: May 5, 2018, 8:02 pm
The May Lviv Tradition is a 9-round round-robin tournament taking place from 16-21 May 2018 in Lviv, Ukraine. Players receive 90 minutes for the first 40 moves, plus a 30-second increment starting from move one. Live game with analysis will be provided daily with the best chess software competing in the Top Chess Engine Championship [...]
Author: videnova
Posted: May 5, 2018, 7:33 pm

Canadian Chess Newsfeed

Not the Best of the Web features two competitions which ought to create some buzz, but bad internet presence makes them both evidence for the prosecution... 


53rd Capablanca Memorial

May 9-19, 2018.
Havana, Cuba

The Elite tournament is a six-player double round robin. After 8 of 12 rounds the field, with the exception of the tail-ender, is in precise order of rating:

  1. Samuel Shankland: (2701) 6
  2. Aleksey Dreev: (2653) 5
  3. David Anton Guijarro: (2646) 4.5
  4. Aleksandr Rakhmanov: (2635) 3
  5. Yusnel Alonso Bacallao: (2594) 3
  6. Lazaro Bruzon: (2664) 2.5

Three Canadians are playing in the "Abierto" (Open) section:

  • GM Bator Sambuev: lost his first two games but has rolled back to 6/8.
  • IM Thanh Nha Duong: 4/8
  • Halldor Palsson: 2/8.

Unfortunately, Cuban internet is unreliable at best, and this makes it almost impossible to use the official site. Games can be followed elsewhere.

Homepage
http://torneocapablanca.inder.cu

Live Games
http://www.chessdom.com/53rd-capablanca-memorial/

Results
http://chess-results.com/fed.aspx?lan=1&fed=CUB


Women's World Championship Match

May 3-19, 2018.
Shanghai & Chongqing, China

The Women's World Championship is now contested annually, alternating between a knock-out tournament and a match between the knock-out winner and a Grand Prix-style qualifier. Current Champion Tan Zhongyi, who won the title at the 2017 Women's World Cup knock-out in Tehran, defends her title in a 10 game match against World #2 Ju Wenjun, who won the 2016-17 Grand Prix. After 9 games, Ju leads 5:4. The final round is May 18, with Tan needing to win with the Black pieces to force a playoff.

Unfortunately:

  1. World #1 Hou Yifan refused to play in the women's Championship cycle due to the unpredictably changing schedule.
  2. The original website for the event was 100% Chinese. 

FIDE Site
http://china2018.fide.com/

Live Games (3am EST)
http://www.chessdom.com/womens-world-championship-match-2018/

Author: John Upper
Posted: May 18, 2018, 6:00 am

Our Canadian Game of the Week is Adam Dorrance vs Eric Hansen, from the 2018 Bluenose Open in Halifax, annotated by Adam Dorrance.

 

(photo: after chess fun with GM Eric Hansen, David Zhou & Adam Dorrance)


Bluenose Open
February 23-25, 2018
Saint Mary’s University, Halifax

Was a 5 round swiss with the relatively more civilized time control of G/120 + 30.

  • 46 players competed.
  • Adam Dorrance won with 4.5/5. 
  • GM Eric Hansen, David Zhou, Jose Gonzalez-Cueto were =2nd-4th with 4/5.
  • As Adam mentions in his notes, Eric took a bye in round 3 to play for his Chessbrah team in the chess.com PRO League.
  • Special mention for Cynthia Cui, who was tied for the lead going into the last round, but lost to a visiting GM.

..
() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Bluenose Open 2018"]
[Site "Halifax"]
[Date "2018.02.25"]
[Round "4.1"]
[White "Dorrance, Adam"]
[Black "Hansen, Eric"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D90"]
[WhiteElo "2297"]
[BlackElo "2627"]
[Annotator "Adam Dorrance"]
[PlyCount "198"]
[EventDate "2018.05.11"]
[EventCountry "CAN"]

{When I heard a GM (Eric Hansen) was coming to play in tournament in Nova
Scotia for the first time ever, I knew I had to go up to the city for the
weekend, even though I had been playing next to no chess the past couple of
years (because of University, work, sports, etc.). This is because for players
living in the Maritimes, it is a very rare occurrence to have a good chance
play any titiled player in a tournament, let alone a GM! Even though people
found out about his participation on late notice (only several days before the
first round), not surprisingly, this tournament turned out to be one of, if
not the, biggest tournaments on Nova Scotian soil with an attendance of 46
players. Fortunately I did get paired up with him, which meant my trip up
wasn't a waste (since in a five round tournament with many players there was a
chance I might not have been paired with him at all). My game with Eric
occurred in the fourth of five rounds during then 2018 Bluenose Open in
Halifax. After the first three rounds, I was the sole leader with 3/3 since
Eric (2.5/3) had to take a half point bye in the third round to play a PRO
Chess League match. That meant that Eric wanted to beat me to try and win the
tournament outright, along with the large (for Maritime tournaments) cash
prize.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. h4 {[#] The minimal
preparation I did for the tournament revolved almost exclusively along this
one line in the Grunfeld. I had noticed that Eric had previously encountered
the 5.h4 line a couple of times in the past, and it seemed like it was a
tricky line that gave him a bit of trouble. Plus, my thought process was the
more I play solid, non main line theory, the better of a chance I would have
against an opponent obviously out of my league.} dxc4 6. e4 c5 ({His only two
games I could find in the h4 Grunfeld continued} 6... O-O 7. Bxc4 (7. e5 Nh5 8.
Bxc4 c5 $11 {Al-Sayed-Hansen, FIDE World Rapid 2014, 0-1}) 7... Bg4 8. e5 Nfd7
9. h5 $14 {Fridman-Hansen, 5th Blitz Marathon 2014, 1-0}) 7. d5 {[#]} e6 $6 {
Eric spent quite a bit of time on this move (I can't remember the exact amount,
but I think it was at least two-thirds (around an hour) of his remaining time).
I assume that he wanted to escape the tricky theory that accompanies this line,
especially if he did not remeber it too well. I think this moves gives me a
Benoni-type of structure and a bit of an advantage out of the opening, but it
makes sense he wants to get me out of my preparation and try to prove he is a
stronger player (even with a small disadvantage).} ({There are many tricky
variations in this opening, but just to give readers a taste here is one
sample of a main line} 7... b5 8. h5 O-O 9. hxg6 fxg6 10. e5 Ng4 11. d6 e6 12.
Nxb5 Qa5+ 13. Nc3 Nd7 14. Rxh7 $5 {where the position is very tactical and
unclear (if either side makes a little mistake, their position can crumble
very quickly).}) 8. Bxc4 exd5 9. exd5 O-O 10. O-O Bg4 11. Bf4 Nbd7 12. Qd3 Nb6
13. Nd2 Bf5 14. Qf3 Ng4 15. Qg3 Re8 16. Rad1 Nxc4 17. Nxc4 Nf6 {[#] I had
calculated the last several moves that were played (or similar variations) and
arrived at a position (or similar position) to this one. I was very happy with
my position because I consider getting a middle game position like this one
where I thought my pieces were very well placed against a 2600 GM, a success.
As well, I had a very sizeable time advantage on my opponent. With my next
move, I threw away my advantage and almost (probably should have) cost myself
the game.} 18. Nd6 $2 {I tried being too cheeky and missed a relatively simple
variation that would have forced me to make inferior exchanges (worse than
what happened in the game).} Nh5 19. Qf3 Qxh4 ({The move I had missed, which
he may have as well was after} 19... Nxf4 {I had intended to play} 20. Nxf5 $2
{but missed the relatively obvious move} Bxc3 {and after} 21. Qxf4 Be5 22. Nh6+
Kg7 23. Qg5 {I am basically lost. To salvage any chances I would have had to
play 20. Nxe8 instead, but after 20... Be5, my position again is not looking
very good, to be optimistic.}) 20. Nxe8 Rxe8 21. Bg3 Nxg3 22. Qxg3 Qxg3 23.
fxg3 {[#] This was a position I had calculated in my head, but mistakenly
underevaluated the strength of his bishop pair and pawn structure. I knew,
even up the exchange (R vs B and P), I would have to fight most likely for a
draw in an awkward and slightly inferior position for the rest of the game,
which I assumed would be very long and depressing, as he needed to grind me
down and win the game because of the aforementioned tournament standings.} Bd4+
24. Kh2 Rd8 25. Rf4 Be5 26. Rc4 b6 27. Rd2 h5 28. Ne2 Bd6 29. a4 Kg7 30. Kg1 a6
31. Kf2 b5 32. Rc1 {I probably played too passively the previous several moves,
but it is hard to see a plan to break through against his very well placed, and
very well coordinated pieces.} c4 33. axb5 axb5 {It appears that I am a couple
moves from being steamrolled by his bishops and pawns, but I had seen one move
that we both agreed afterwards was "in time" and gave me a fighting chance.}
34. b3 Bb4 (34... Bc5+ 35. Ke1 Be3 36. bxc4 bxc4 37. Rxc4 Bxd2+ 38. Kxd2 Rxd5+
{leads to a similar position that was arrived at in the game.}) 35. Rd4 Bc5 36.
bxc4 bxc4 37. Rcxc4 Rxd5 38. Rxc5 Rxc5 {Considering the previous positions, I
was rather happy to have a fighting chance for a draw, even though I
knew it would be very tough to hold, especially with our remaining times being
very similar (around 15 mins each).} 39. Rd2 Be4 40. Kg1 Kf6 41. Kh2 {[#] My
main plan was to create a bit of a fortress with my king on h2 and pawns on g2
and g3. My knight could defend on f4 and g1 if need be and my rook would stay
on the second rank to guard my weakness on g2. Again, I knew I still did not
have great position, but I figured there was a chance that this fortress type
set-up might be holdable. As well, I knew if I either traded off the rooks or
the knight for bishop, the game would end in a draw so that was my only other
real goal.} Bf5 42. Rb2 Kg5 43. Ng1 Rc3 44. Nf3+ Kf6 45. Rb6+ Kg7 46. Rb2 Be4
47. Ng5 Bd5 48. Rd2 Bc6 49. Rf2 Bd5 50. Rd2 Rc5 51. Nh3 Be6 52. Nf4 Bg4 53. Rb2
g5 54. Nd3 Rd5 55. Nf2 Bf5 56. Ra2 Rc5 57. Rd2 Rc3 58. Rb2 Kg6 59. Re2 g4 60.
Rb2 f6 61. Ra2 Be6 62. Re2 Bf5 63. Ra2 Re3 64. Nd1 Re1 65. Nf2 Rc1 66. Rb2 Bc2
67. Ra2 Kg5 $2 {Here, Eric made the mistake of losing all of his advantage.} ({
He can keep maneuvering after} 67... Bf5) 68. Ra5+ $1 Kg6 69. Rc5 Kh6 {[#]} 70.
Nd3 {This may have been a slightly longer way of drawing and may have let Eric
"off of the hook" as I could have kept the pressure on the c-file by playing
70. Rc7 and he would have had to be careful where he placed his King. I was in
a bit of time trouble though as making that many careful moves in long endgame
is not always obvious and needs some thinking time to make sure I don't
blunder. Therefore, I was relieved to see 70. Nd3 after a very long endgame
and was happy to take a draw any way I could.} Rd1 71. Rxc2 Rxd3 {This endgame
is a fairly easy draw as it is hard for him to make any progress with my rook
harassing his King and pawns.} 72. Rc5 Kg6 73. Ra5 Rd7 74. Rb5 Rg7 75. Ra5 Re7
76. Rb5 Re5 77. Rb8 Kf5 78. Rf8 Ra5 79. Re8 Re5 80. Rf8 Kg6 81. Rg8+ Kf7 82.
Rh8 Kg7 83. Rb8 Kf7 84. Rb6 Rd5 85. Ra6 Rd2 86. Rb6 Kg6 87. Rb5 Rd6 88. Ra5 Rd7
89. Rb5 Rh7 90. Rb8 Kg5 91. Rb5+ f5 92. Rb8 h4 93. Rg8+ Kf6 94. gxh4 Rxh4+ 95.
Kg3 Rh1 96. Rf8+ Ke6 97. Re8+ Kf7 98. Ra8 Re1 99. Kf4 Rf1+ {I think he was
satisfied enough that I proved I could draw the game after a 6+ hour grudge
match. I know neither side played perfectly, but it was my first ever result
in a classical over-the-board game with a GM (after two losses when I was
younger), and one that I will definitely remember.  Eric and I went on to win
our last round games, so I won the tournament outright with 4.5/5 and he tied
for second with 4/5 (one bye) with his friend David Zhou and Jose
Gonzalez-Cueto.  As a closing, I was fortunate to hang out with Eric (and
David) throughout the weekend and was very impressed with how nice and
respectful they were to everyone at the tournament and how they shared their
knowledge of chess with everyone. As I stated above, it is once in a blue moon
that a titled player (let alone a GM) comes to little Nova Scotia (and the
rest of the Maritimes) to play chess, so I wanted to thank them on behalf of
all the participants for coming out and creating a turnout and buzz in Nova
Scotia chess that has not been seen in quite some time.} 1/2-1/2
merida
46
..

Tags:

Author: John Upper
Posted: May 16, 2018, 3:13 pm

The players for both the Canadian men's and women's Olympiad teams have been announced:

Men's Team 

  • GM Aman Hambleton
  • GM Eric Hansen
  • GM Alexandre LeSiege
  • IM Nikolay Noritsyn
  • GM Razvan Preotu

Women’s Team

  • Lali Agbabishvili
  • WFM Svitlana Demchenko
  • WIM Agnieszka Matras-Clement
  • WIM Maili-Jade Ouellet
  • WGM Qiyu Zhou

Notes:

  • Names above are listed in alphabetical order. Actual board order will be determined by the Captains, who will be selected by the players.
  • Preotu, Demchenko and Matras-Clement will be playing in their first Olympiads.
  • All five of the top-rated women accepted their invitations. Two of the men -- 2016 Olympiad board 2 silver medalist GM Anton Kovalyov, and current Canadian Champion GM Bator Sambuev -- both declined.
  • Yuanling Yuan, Canada's top-performing woman at the previous two Olympiads, was not eligible due to an insufficient number of rated games.

2018 Chess Olympiad

The Chess Olympiad is an 11 round Swiss-system 4-player team tournaments, held in two sections: women and open. It is held every two years and is the largest elite level tournament on the chess calendar. In 2016 a total of 304 teams were entered in the two sections, with the USA taking the open and China winning the women's.

The 43rd Chess Olympiad will be held in Batumi, Georgia -- on the east coast of the Black Sea, just north of Turkey -- September 23 - October 7, 2018.

Olympiad Homepage
https://batumi2018.fide.com/en

Author: John Upper
Posted: May 11, 2018, 10:34 pm

The Trois-Rivières Open is not the mega-event it used to be, but it still attracts an exceptionally large and strong field for a weekend event. This year's event was held March 16-18, 2018, and the $11,000+ prize fund attracted three GMs: Victor Mikhalevski from Israel, and Quebec's Bator Sambuev and Alexandre Le Siege. Alexandre beat Sambuev in round 4, and had a perfunctory draw with Mikhalevski -- complete score: 1.Nf3 Nf6  2.c4 g6  3.Nc3 d5  4.cxd5 1/2-1/2 -- to split first with 4.5/5. 

Most notable were the performances of young players: WIM (and current Canadian Women's Champion) Maili-Jade Ouellet and FM Shawn Rodrigue-Lemieux both lost to Mikhalevski, but won all their other games to finish tied with IM Thanh Nha Duong for =3rd-5th with 4/5.  MJ will be 16 this year, and SRL turns 14.

Perhaps more remarkable was the performance of Daniel Xu, who lost to Sambuev in the last round, but still scored - +1 =3 -1 for a performance rating of 2353. Daniel turns 10 this year.

Our Game of the Week is actually two of Daniel's games from Trois-Rivières: his first round win over a Master, and his last round loss against GM Sambuev.... from a position where Daniel had a forced draw one move from the end, but missed it while playing on increment!

Link to Trois-Rivières Homepage:

https://oe3r.org/en/


..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Trois-Rivieres op"]
[Site "Trois-Rivieres CAN"]
[Date "2018.03.16"]
[Round "1.9"]
[White "Xu, Daniel"]
[Black "Beaulieu, Eric"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D58"]
[WhiteElo "2006"]
[BlackElo "2307"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "49"]
[EventDate "2018.03.16"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "5"]
[EventCountry "CAN"]

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. c4 e6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e3 O-O 6. Nc3 h6 7. Bh4 b6 8. Bd3
Bb7 9. O-O Nbd7 10. Qe2 c5 {[#]A standard Tartakower QGD position. Both sides
have to be ready for pawn exchanges leading to an IQP for White or hanging
pawns for Black.} 11. cxd5 (11. Rfd1 Ne4 12. Bg3 cxd4 13. exd4 Ndf6 14. Rac1
Rc8 15. Bxe4 Nxe4 16. Nxe4 dxe4 17. Ne5 Qe8 $1 {guarding g6 to threatening to
win a piece with ...f6-f5-f4.} 18. f4 exf3 19. Nxf3 Bf6 20. Bd6 Be7 21. Bg3 Bf6
22. Bd6 Be7 23. Bg3 {½-½ Short,N (2675)-Adams,M (2751) Gibraltar, 2017.})
11... exd5 12. Rac1 c4 $6 {I'm reluctant to call this move "principled", but
it does shut down the Rc1 and cut across White's play against d5 via dxc5 and
Ba6.} (12... Ne4 13. Bxe7 Qxe7 14. Ba6 Ndf6 15. Bxb7 Qxb7 16. dxc5 bxc5 17.
Nxe4 Nxe4 {The kind of position I'd expect Seirawan would like: his king is
safe and he has Black's hanging pawns to "gnaw on". But watch how quickly
Black turns those pawns into a winning advantage after only a few slow moves
by White.} 18. Rc2 Rfe8 19. Qd3 Rad8 20. h3 Qb6 21. Nd2 c4 $1 22. Qe2 (22. Qd4
Qxd4 23. exd4 Nxd2 24. Rxd2 Rb8 $15) 22... d4 $1 23. Nxc4 d3 $19 24. Qf3 Ng5
25. Qf5 g6 26. Nxb6 {White has two pieces hanging after Black recaptures the Q,
so 0-1 Seirawan,Y (2620)-Bacrot,E (2697) Berlin (World Rapid), 2015.}) 13. Bb1
a6 14. Qc2 b5 15. Ne5 {[#]Critical Position White threatens to remove the
defender of h7 with Nxd7 then Bxf6.} Nxe5 $2 (15... g6 $4 {and White can play
the rest "by hand"} 16. Nxg6 $18 {wins a pawn or at least three pawns for the
N with a huge attack.}) (15... Re8 $5 {concedes h7 but makes a space for the K}
16. Nxd7 Qxd7 17. Bxf6 Bxf6 18. Qh7+ Kf8 19. e4 $6 (19. Rfe1 $1 {N}) 19... g6
$2 (19... dxe4 $15) 20. e5 Bg7 21. f4 $18 {1-0 (34) Bocharov,D (2526)-Bragin,A
(2255) Tomsk, 2003.}) (15... Ne4 $1 {is the computer's choice, leading to a
complex position} 16. Nxd7 $1 Qxd7 (16... Bxh4 $2 {puts the B off-side} 17. Nc5
$1 Qe7 18. f3 Nf6 19. Nxb7 Qxb7 20. g3 $18 {and f4 traps the B}) 17. Bxe7 Qxe7
18. f3 Nf6 19. e4 b4 20. e5 (20. Nxd5 $2 Bxd5 $1 $15) 20... bxc3 21. exf6 (21.
bxc3 g6 $11) 21... Qe3+ 22. Kh1 g6 $13) 16. dxe5 Ne4 {Only move.} 17. Bxe7 Qxe7 18. f3 $1
$16 Qxe5 $2 (18... Ng5 19. h4 Qxe5 20. hxg5 Qxe3+ 21. Rf2 g6 22. Qd2 $1 Qxg5 {
Black has some pawns for the N, but his d5 pawn is doomed.}) 19. fxe4 dxe4 20.
Nxe4 f5 21. Qc3 $1 Qd5 22. Rcd1 $1 b4 {Desperation.} (22... Qc6 23. Rd6 {Only move.} $18
{breaks the battery on g2 before moving the N.}) 23. Qxb4 Qc6 24. Rd6 Qc7 25.
Ng3 1-0


[Event "Trois-Rivieres op"]
[Site "Trois-Rivieres CAN"]
[Date "2018.03.18"]
[Round "5.5"]
[White "Sambuev, Bator"]
[Black "Xu, Daniel"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D30"]
[WhiteElo "2518"]
[BlackElo "2006"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "95"]
[EventDate "2018.03.16"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "5"]
[EventCountry "CAN"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 e6 5. Nbd2 Be7 (5... c5 $1 {taking
advantage of the absence of Nc3 is popular, and the best-scoring for Black.})
6. Bd3 Nbd7 7. O-O O-O 8. b3 b6 9. Bb2 Bb7 10. Qe2 Qc7 (10... c5 11. Rfd1 cxd4
12. exd4 dxc4 13. bxc4 Re8 14. Ne5 Nxe5 15. dxe5 Nd7 16. Ne4 Qc7 17. Nd6 Bxd6
18. exd6 Qc6 19. Qg4 e5 $13 {(½-½, 55) Alekhine,A-Bogoljubow,E W Ch g25,
1929.}) 11. Rac1 Rac8 12. cxd5 exd5 (12... Nxd5 $5 13. g3 {and Black has some
tough decisions about how to cope with e3-e4.}) 13. Ne5 c5 14. Bf5 Rcd8 15. f4
$5 Rfe8 16. Rf3 g6 17. Rg3 Bf8 18. Ndf3 {[#]White has massed his pieces for a
kingside attack, but Black keeps cool.} Bg7 (18... Nxe5 19. fxe5 (19. Nxe5 Bc8
$11) 19... Nh5 20. Rg4 Ng7 $13) 19. Ng5 Nxe5 20. dxe5 $6 {A surprising
recapture. I don't know why White rejected the more natural fxe5.} (20. fxe5
Ne4 21. Nxe4 dxe4 22. Qg4 $14 {attacking e4 and keeping pressure on the
kingside; for example,} Qc6 23. h4 Kf8 24. h5 Bh6 {trying to trap the B} 25.
hxg6 hxg6 26. e6 $1 (26. Rf1 $5) 26... gxf5 27. Qg8+ Ke7 28. Qxf7+ Kd6 29.
dxc5+ {will win the Q at least.}) 20... Ne4 21. Nxe4 dxe4 22. h4 Kf8 $1 {
Unpinning the g6 pawn and asking the Bf5 its intentions.} 23. Bh3 {White
doesn't have to retreat the Bf5.} (23. b4 $5 gxf5 24. Qh5 {threatening Rxg7
then e6.} Re6 $1 (24... a6 25. Rxg7 Kxg7 26. e6+) 25. Qxh7 Rg6 26. Rxg6 fxg6
27. Qxg6 $14 {White has two pawns for the piece, and with Black's Bs blocked
and K exposed, good chances to get a third.}) 23... Bc8 24. h5 Bxh3 25. Rxh3 {
[#]} Qd7 $4 {This should lose a piece.} (25... Rd3 $142 $11) 26. hxg6 $2 (26.
h6 $1 Bh8 27. e6 $18 {with a double attack on d7 and h8.}) 26... hxg6 27. Bc3
Qe6 28. Qc4 $5 {Very uncharacteristic for Sambuev, who usually tries to keep
balanced positions complex.} Qxc4 29. bxc4 Rd3 30. Kf2 Red8 31. Ke2 Ke7 32. Rh7
Rg8 (32... Rh8 $2 {will not trap the R} 33. Rxg7 Kf8 34. e6 (34. Rxf7+ {
also works.}) 34... Rxc3 35. Rxf7+ $18) 33. Bb2 Rgd8 34. Rc2 Bf8 35. Rh1 Bg7
36. Rh7 Bf8 37. Bc3 Rd1 38. Be1 Ke6 39. g4 Rb1 (39... R8d7 $1 {defending f7 so
the K can restrict the center pawns.}) 40. Bh4 {[#]Critical Position Black's K
is in a small box, but (surprisingly) so is White's! Can you see how Black can
hold?} Rdd1 $4 (40... Rh1 $1 41. Bxd8 Rxh7 $11) (40... Rd7 $1 41. Rh8 Be7 (
41... Rh1 $1) 42. Re8 Rh1 43. f5+ gxf5 44. gxf5+ Kxf5 45. Rxe7 Rh2+ $1 46. Ke1
(46. Kf1 $4 Rd1+ 47. Be1 Rxc2) 46... Rh1+ $11) 41. f5+ $1 $18 gxf5 42. gxf5+
Kxf5 (42... Kxe5 43. Rxf7 Bd6 44. Bg3#) 43. Rxf7+ Kg4 44. Rf4+ Kh5 45. e6 Rh1 {
[#]} 46. Rxf8 $4 (46. Rd2 $1 $18 Rxh4 47. Rd5+ {Only move.} $18) (46. e7 {also wins} Rh2+
47. Rf2 $18) 46... Kxh4 $1 $11 47. e7 (47. Rh8+ Kg5 $11) 47... Kg3 $4 {There's
no reason to bring the K in to close the exits since White's K already has no
exit:} (47... Rhe1+ {Only move.} $11 48. Kd2 Red1+ 49. Ke2 (49. Kc3 $4 Rd3#) 49... Re1+
50. Kf2 Rf1+ 51. Kg2 Rg1+ $11) 48. Rg8+ {Only move.} {White ends the perpetual by
forcing off a pair of Rs with Rh8+ and then promote.} 1-0
merida
46

..


Author: John Upper
Posted: May 3, 2018, 10:13 pm

 May 2018

May 5, 2018 

Eagle Minds bi-monthly Active
Burlington, ON

U1600
5 round swiss
TC: G/25

http://eaglemindschess.weebly.com/bi-monthly-tournaments.html 

 

May 5, 2018 

McGill Open Rapid
New Residence Hall, McGill, Montréal

Open and U1800
5 round swiss
TC: 25 + 5

http://chess.ca/newsfeed/node/1045


May 5, 2018 

Soo Spring Active
Centennial Public Library, Sault Ste. Marie

5 round swiss
TC: 25 + 2 sec delay

http://www.miltonchess.ca/images/cfc/2018%20soo%20active%20unrated.pdf

 

May 5-6, 2018

Arnprior Open
Arnprior, ON

Details TBA
traditionally a 5 rd swiss @ 90 + 30

https://eoca.ca/#/

 

May 5-6, 2018

Edmonton International Qualifier
Edmonton Chess Club

5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

Winner earns the right to participate in the 13th Edmonton International (conditions apply).

http://www.albertachess.org/2018EIQF.php

 

May 6, 2018

Manitoba Scholastic Championship
University of Manitoba, St. Paul's Belltower Café

K-12 children only

https://chess.chessmanitoba.org/?page_id=34

 


 May 11-12, 2018

50th Ontario High School Chess Championship
Tartu College, Toronto

Deadline for Entries: April 12, 2018.

http://www.ohscc.on.ca/

 

May 11-13, 2018

Nova Scotia Open
Saint Mary’s University, Halifax

5 round swiss
TC: 120 + 30

http://www.nschess.ca/?p=1127

 

May 12, 2018

BC Elementary Chess Tournament
St.George's Elementary School, Vancouver 

http://wcjc.blogspot.ca/

 

May 12-13, 2018

Alberta Seniors Chess Championship
Calgary Chess Club

Alberta residents 50+ years old as of Dec. 31, 2018.

5 round swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.albertachess.org/2018ASC.php

Alberta Women's Championship
Calgary Chess Club

5 round swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.albertachess.org/2018AWC.php

 


 May 19, 2018

NYYCC and GP
St. Timothy Catholic School,  North York, ON

U8-U18
5 round swiss
TC: G/25

https://senecahillchess.com/2017/11/08/2018-nyycc-and-gp/


May 19-21, 2018  

Ontario Open
Annex Chess Club, 918 Bathurst St., Toronto

6 round swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://annexchessclub.com/2018-ontario-open/

 

43rd Keres Memorial 
Executive Airport Plaza Hotel, Richmond, BC

6 round swiss
TC: 100 + 30

$5000 guaranteed

http://keresmemorial.pbworks.com/w/page/1785469/FrontPage

 


 May 25-27, 2018

Open de Sherbrooke
Aréna Julien-Ducharme, Sherbrooke

Système suisse de 5 rondes.
Cad: 1h15/30 coups + 40min./mat, incrément de 30s par coup.

http://www.echecs-sherbrooke.com/open.php


May 26-27, 2018

2018 Charlottetown Open
UPEI, Charlottetown

5 round swiss
TC: 120 + 30s delay

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/charop18.html


May 26-27, 2018

2018 Aron Kaptsan Memorial Sectionals
University of Winnipeg, Manitoba

6-player RR sectionals by rating (no byes!)
TC: G/50 + 10

https://chess.chessmanitoba.org/?page_id=34

 

 

May 27, 2018

Blitz de fin de saison
Collège Jean-de-Brébeuf, Montréal

6 double-round Swiss
TC: 3 + 2

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/activite/blitz-de-fin-de-saison


 


JUNE 2018

June 2, 2018

Championnat Jeunesse Rapide du Québec
Centre Père Marquette, Montréal

Ages: U8 to U18
Must be Quebec resident for 1 year

https://www.tourdelareussite.org/championnat-jeunesse-rapide

 

June 2-3, 2018

Golden Horseshoe Championship
Sandman Signature Mississauga Hotel, Mississauga

5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

Registered players include: GM Razvan Preotu, IM Tomas Krnan, IM Kaiqi Yang

https://elevatemychess.com/golden-horseshoe-championship/

 

35th Trumpeter Classic
Sandman Hotel, Grande Prairie, AB

5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://gpchessclub.com/trumpeter-classic


June 8-10, 2018

George Beals Open
Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax

5 round Swiss
TC: 120 + 30

http://www.nschess.ca/?p=1142


June 9, 2018

Aurora Chess Day
Aurora Public Library, Aurora, ON

4 round Swiss
TC: 55m + 5s

http://www.aucc.club/aurora-chess-day/aurora-chess-day-details/


June 9-10, 2018

5th Harbourfront Chessfest
Toronto

  • Jumbo boards for anyone to play
  • displays and info
  • Toronto Blitz Championship on Sunday

http://annexchessclub.com/harbourfront-chessfest/

 

Calgary International Qualifier
Calgary Chess Club

Organizer: Brad Booker
Details: TBA


June 16-17, 2018

Guelph Pro-Am

Details: TBA
Contact: halbond*AT*sympaticoDOTca


June 19-24, 2018

13th Edmonton International
Edmonton Chess Club

Details: TBA
Organizer: CM Rafael Arruebarrena

 

June 22-24, 2018

Championnat Ouvert de Laval
Hôtel Holiday Inn, Laval

5 round Swiss
TC: 40/90 + g30 + 30s

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/activite/championnat-ouvert-de-laval-0

 

Eastern Ontario Open
RA Centre, Ottawa

5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

https://s3.amazonaws.com/eoca/data/2018%20Eastern%20Ontario%20Open%20Chess%20Championship.pdf

 

June 22-24, 2018

Edmonton International Open

Organizer: CM Rafael Arruebarrena
Details: TBA

 

June 22-24, 2018

2018 BC Senior Championship 
Comfort Inn, Surrey, BC

5 round Swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://victoriachessclub.pbworks.com/w/page/112397404/BC%20Senior


June 27-29,  2018

Fort McMurray All-Girls Chess Camp
Fort McMurray

Organizer: Jina Burn
Details: TBA

 

June 30-July 2,  2018
Fort McMurray Open

Organizer: Jina Burn
Details: TBA

Author: John Upper
Posted: May 2, 2018, 7:16 pm

Eight of the world's top 10 players compete this week in two tournaments in St.Louis and Shamkir, Azerbaijan, on this week's Best of the Web...


US Chess Championship

 Two 12-player round robins to decide the US and US Women's Championship April 18-30, 2018, at the newly renamed St, Louis Chess Club.

Top players include the complete 2016 Olympiad winning team: Caruana, Nakamura, So, Robson, and Shankland. Juniors GM Jeffery Xiong and GM Awonder Laing will also compete.

In the Women's competition, 7-time US Champion GM Irina Krush and 4-time Champion Anna Zatonskih, and the two previous Champons -- Sabina Foisor and Nazi Paikidze -- all play. WGM Jennifer Yu, the top rated U16 female, also plays.

Live Games and Commentary
April 18-30, 2018. 1pm local, 2pm EST

https://uschesschamps.com/2018-us-championships/live

Note: GM Eric Hansen is in St.Louis to do live on-site commentary for fans at the event, and is not part of the regular on-line team of Seirawan, Shahade, and Ashley.


Gashimov Memorial

The 5th Gashimov Memorial, honouring the memory of Azerbaijani GM Vugar Gashimov (who died at 27), takes place April 19-28, 2018 in Shamkir, Azerbaijan.

The field includes World Champion Magnus Carlsen, and three of the recent Candidates finalists:

  Name FED Rating Rank
Carlsen, Magnus NOR 2843 1
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar AZE 2814 2
Ding, Liren CHN 2778 8
Karjakin, Sergey RUS 2778 9
Giri, Anish NED 2777 10
Topalov, Veselin BUL 2749 17
Radjabov, Teimour AZE 2748 18
Navara, David CZR 2745 19
Wojtaszek, Radoslaw POL 2744 20
Mamedov, Rauf AZE 2704 38

 

Live Games
Start 3pm local, 7am EST. 

http://shamkirchess.com/

Author: John Upper
Posted: April 18, 2018, 3:59 pm

Canadians were awarded three titles at the 1st quarter meeting of the Presidential Board of the FIDE, which was held in Minsk, Belarus, on April 06-09, 2018:

  • Grand Master: Aman Hambleton
  • International Arbiter: Bernard Ouimet
  • International Organizer: Vadim Tsypin

Congratulations to all three!

 


Bernard Ouimet writes:

Dear friends,

I am extremely happy to-day to tell you that FIDE, the world chess federation, has approved my certification as Intenational arbiter at the Minsk congress in Belarus.

I am grateful to the Fédération québécoise des échecs and to Chess'n Math Association for hiring me as arbiter at qualified events in order to obtain the title.

I strongly appreciate my colleague arbiters who shared their knowledge with me and on occasion provided their advice. In alphabetical order, they are Alexandre Ber, Richard Bérubé, Larry Bevand, Hal Bond, Larry Bevand, Jean-Roger Boutin, Yves Casaubon (deceased), Jean-Dominique Coquereau (Italy), Pierre Denommée, Danny Goldenberg, Alex Relya (USA) and Vadim Tsypin.

Thank you heartily all, let’s continue working together for the good of chess !

Bernard Ouimet

Gens Una Sumus


Vadim Tsypin writes:

I am humbled to join the fraternity of seven distinguished Canadian IOs and to become the first person in this country to earn this title after 2012, when new strict formal rules came into effect. 

I would like to thank all the leaders of the Fédération québécoise des échecs (FQE) and the Chess Federation of Canada (CFC) who selflessly guided and supported me. My profound gratitude goes to the Director General of the FQE Richard Bérubé and the FIDE Zone 2.2 President and Delegate IA/IO Hal Bond. Richard and Hal, nothing would be possible without you!

Thanks so much to all of you, and let’s conquer new challenges together.

Vadim I. Tsypin


Links

FIDE Titles Approved at 2018.04 Meeting
http://fide.com/component/content/article/1-fide-news/10817-list-of-titles-approved-by-the-2018-1st-quarter-pb-in-minsk-belarus.html

 

FIDE Cards

Hambleton
https://ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?event=2606577

Ouimet
https://ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?event=2615371

Tsypin
https://ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?event=2623463

 

For more on Aman's final norm, including links to more of his annotated games, see: http://chess.ca/newsfeed/node/1028

To watch Aman streaming online, subscribe to the ChessBrah stream: https://www.twitch.tv/chessbrah

Category:

Author: John Upper
Posted: April 10, 2018, 5:23 pm

Our Canadian Game of the Week is GM Eric Hansen's round 4 win over NM Keith MacKinnon at the 2018 Nanaimo Spring Open.
White plays the Flohr-Mikenas attack, and turns a development advantage into a crushing and thematic attack on the light squares...

 


The Nanaimo Spring Open took place March 3-4, 2018. 

It exceeded their announced maximum number of players, possibly due to the participation of GM Eric Hansen, who was making a rare IRL -- In Real Life -- chess appearance. Eric won with 5/5. Jiri Blaha was second with 4/5; with Zulfikar Sali, Keith MacKinnon and Brandon Zhu tied for 3-5th with 3.5/5.

photo: Hansen - MacKinnon, before White's 16th move.

photos
https://nanaimo-open.ca/gallery

results
http://chess.ca/crosstable?tournament_check_number=201803009

non-IRL Eric:
You can frequently watch Eric playing online on the Chessbrah Twitch channel:
https://www.twitch.tv/chessbrah

 


Our Canadian Game of the Week is Eric's round 4 win over NM Keith MacKinnon. White plays the Flohr-Mikenas attack, and turns a development advantage into a crushing and thematic attack on the light squares. 

..

 

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Nanaimo Spring Open 2018"]
[Site "Nanaimo"]
[Date "2018.03.04"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Hansen, Eric"]
[Black "MacKinnon, Keith"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A18"]
[WhiteElo "2621"]
[BlackElo "2280"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "49"]
[EventDate "2018.03.13"]
[SourceTitle "CFC Newsfeed"]

1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. e4 {The Flohr-Mikenas Attack -- White's most aggressive way to cross Black's hopes to transpose to a safe QGD with 3...d5.} d5 ({The other main
option is} 3... c5 4. e5 Ng8 {when White gets a development advantage while
Black surrounds and wins the e5 pawn.}) 4. e5 d4 (4... Ne4 {is a playable pawn
sacrifice, hoping for} 5. Nxe4 dxe4 6. Qg4 Nc6 7. Qxe4 Qd4 $1 {with lots of
play.}) ({Instead, after} 4... Ne4 {White gets a good game just by developing
with} 5. Nf3 $14 {as Black's Ne4 will almost always eventually have to take on
c3, leaving White with more space and freer development.}) 5. exf6 dxc3 6. bxc3
Qxf6 {[#]} 7. Nf3 (7. d4 e5 8. Nf3 Nc6 (8... exd4 {used to be the main line,
but has fallen out of fashion after} 9. Bg5 Qe6+ 10. Be2 f6 11. Nxd4 Qf7 12.
Bh6 $3 $16 {a positional bombshell from Simon Williams. The crude point is
that taking the Bh6 loses the Q to Bh5. The subtle point is that Black will
have trouble finding a safe place for his K. White has a huge score from here:
96% and Elo +460!} gxh6 13. Bh5) 9. Bg5 Qg6 10. d5 Nb8 11. h4 h6 12. h5 Qa6 13.
Be3 Nd7 14. Bd3 Ba3 15. O-O Qd6 16. Nh4 O-O 17. Nf5 Qf6 18. Ng3 Qh4 19. Nf5 Qf6
20. Ng3 Qh4 {Black has made eight moves with his Q and hasn't developed his
queenside, but the threat of ...Nf6 and taking the h5-pawn is so serious that..
. ½-½ in Anand,V (2782)-Karjakin,S (2760) London, 2017.}) 7... Nd7 8. d4 Qd8
$5 {It looks wrong to give up a tempo to retreat the Q, but White's threat to
trap the Q with Bg5 and Bd3 requires a response, and Black may have thought
that ...h6 would be a long term weakness and would leave him without good
squares for his minors.} (8... h6 9. Bd3 c5 10. O-O Qd8 $2 11. Bf4 $1 {Look at
White's lead in development.} Nf6 12. Re1 Be7 13. Qd2 Bd7 (13... O-O $2 14.
Bxh6 $18 {shows one problem with ...h6.}) 14. Ne5 Bc6 15. Rad1 (15. Qe3 $1 O-O
$2 16. Bxh6 $18) 15... Ba4 16. Rb1 b6 17. Qe3 Nh5 18. Nxf7 $1 Kxf7 19. Qxe6+
Kf8 20. Bg6 Be8 21. Bxe8 Qxe8 22. Bd6 $18 {(1-0, 32) Grachev,B (2657)-Golubov,
S (2488) Khanty-Mansiysk, 2017.}) 9. Bd3 Be7 10. O-O O-O 11. Bf4 b6 12. Bc2 (
12. Be4 {looks like a obviously good finesse -- luring the R to a square where
the c7 pawn is pinned -- but the computer is unimpressed by my cleverness, and
rates the two moves almost the same.}) 12... Bb7 (12... Bd6 13. Qd3 g6 14. Bg5)
13. Qd3 g6 14. Rfe1 Bf6 15. Rad1 {[#]White has excellent attacking chances,
and can follow the familiar attacking patterns of a standard IQP middlegame,
but without Black having use of d5.} Qc8 $4 {Allowing White's next is
positional suicide.} (15... c5 {was better} 16. Bd6 (16. dxc5 Nxc5 $11) 16... Re8 $14)
(15... Re8 {was also better} 16. Ne5 Nxe5 17. Bxe5 Bxe5 18. Rxe5 Qe7 19. Rde1
$14) 16. Ng5 $1 $16 {After this White will almost inevitably have a winning
sac on the light squares.} Bg7 $6 17. Qh3 $18 Nf6 (17... h6 18. Nxe6 (18. Bxg6
{also wins.}) 18... fxe6 19. Qxe6+ $18) 18. Be5 h5 19. Qg3 $1 ({Just to
demonstrate White's attacking possibilities,} 19. Nxf7 {also wins} Kxf7 (19...
Rxf7 20. Bxg6 Re7 21. Rd3 $18 {and Rg3}) 20. Qg3 Ng4 21. Bxg7 Kxg7 22. f3 $18 {
and Black collapses on the light squares.}) 19... c6 20. Bxf6 Bxf6 {[#]} 21.
Nxe6 $1 fxe6 22. Qxg6+ Bg7 23. Qh7+ Kf7 24. Bg6+ Kf6 25. Bxh5 ({The PGN from
the Nanaimo Open points out that Eric's human move misses a mate in 13:} 25.
Re3 Ke7 26. Qxg7+ Kd8 27. Qxf8+ Kc7 28. Qf4+ Kd8 29. d5 cxd5 30. cxd5 Qd7 31.
Rxe6 h4 32. Rf6 Qe7 33. Rf8+ Qxf8 34. Qxf8+ Kc7 35. Qe7+ Kc8 36. Qe8+ Kc7 37.
d6#) 1-0
merida
46

..

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: April 5, 2018, 4:46 pm

A dangerous upward trend, with only 40 chess tournaments across Canada in April and May 2018!
Cash in now, before they're all gone!

 


April 2018

 

March 30 - April 1, 2018

2018 Alberta Chess Championship & Reserves
Edmonton Chess Club

Championship: 5 round Swiss; TC: 40/90 + G/30 + 30
Reserves: 5 round Swiss; TC: 90 + 30

http://www.albertachess.org/2018AC.html

http://www.albertachess.org/2018AR.php


March 30 - April 2, 2018

12th Annual Grand Pacific Open
Victoria, BC 

  • 6 round Swiss
  • TC: 90 + 30
  • $5,000 Guaranteed
  • side events include: Blitz, Victoria Youth Championship 

http://grandpacificopen.pbworks.com/w/page/15387541/FrontPage


April 6-8, 2018

2018 Halifax Open
Mount Saint Vincent University, Nova Scotia 

5 round swiss
TC: G/120 + 30

http://www.nschess.ca/?p=1123


April 6-8, 2018 

Choc des générations et Perce-Neige
Gymnase de l'école Sts-Martyrs-Canadiens, Montréal, QC

Choc des générations = 5 juniors & cadets vs 5 adults.
    Players include: Chiku-Ratte, MJ Ouellet, IM Hebert and GM Sambuev

Perce-Neige = 4 rondes; 90 + 30 

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/activite/choc-des-generations-1

  

April 7, 2018

TSSCL Individual Championship
WA Porter Collegiate Institute, Toronto

Grades 7-12
Qualifier for Ontario High School Championship

http://www.miltonchess.ca/images/cfc/2018_tsscl_individual_ch.pdf

 

April 7 & 8 2018

Chess Education April Rapid, & April Blitz
3300 Yonge St, Toronto

April 7: Rapid 

  • U2200 sections
  • 5 round swiss
  • TC: 15 + 10

 

April 8: Blitz 

  • U2200 sections
  • 10 round swiss
  • TC: 3 + 2

 https://www.chesseducation.net/tournament-registration


April 7-8, 2018

2018 Lethbridge Open
Polish Hall, Lethbridge, AB

5 round swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.albertachess.org/2018LO.php


April 14, 2018

Waterdown Chess Challenge
St. James United Church, Waterdown, Ontario

http://www.waterdownchessclub.ca/


2018 Alberta Active Championship
Baymont Inn, Red Deer, AB

5 round swiss
TC: g/25 + 5

http://www.albertachess.org/2018AAC.php

 

April 14, 2018

5th Stan Rogers Memorial
Royal Hotel, Chilliwack, BC

6 round swiss
TC: 25 + 5

https://www.facebook.com/events/182305769208524/

 

April 15, 2018

Manitoba Scholastic Championship
University of Manitoba, University College

children K-12 only

https://chess.chessmanitoba.org/?page_id=34 


April 20-22, 2018

Championnat senior du Québec
Stade Olympique, Montréal

5 round swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/activite/championnat-senior-du-quebec

 

Championnat junior du Québec
Stade Olympique, Montréal

Under 20

Two sections:

  • Championnat: par invitation aux six meilleurs joueurs par la cote au 1e mars, 2018.
  • Open: all others.

5 round RR or swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/activite/championnat-junior-du-quebec-2018

 

April 20-22, 2018

Niagara Falls Open 
Niagara Shrine Club, Niagara Falls, ON

5 round swiss
TC: rd.1: G/90; rds. 2-5: 30/90 + g/60

http://www.miltonchess.ca/images/cfc/2018_niagara_falls_open.pdf


April 21, 2018

Kitchener Spring Quick
Kitchener City Hall, Kitchener, ON

5 round swiss
TC: 25 + 10s

http://kwchess.org/tournaments-2/

  

April 21, 2018

Mind Sport Manitoba Open
Sinclair Park Community Center, Winnipeg

5 round swiss
TC: G/30

https://chess.chessmanitoba.org/?page_id=34


April 21-22, 2018

The 90's Memorial Open
Kamloops, BC

5 round swiss
TC: 30/60 + g/30

Contact: justin.cachelin@gmail.com


April 28, 2018

2018 New Brunswick Blitz Championship
Chinese Commerce Centre, Saint John, NB

Preliminaries: 8 round swiss
Final: 8 player RR
TC: G/5

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/nbbl18.html

 

North Vancouver City Chess Championships
Sutherland Secondary, North Vancouver

K-12 children only
5 round swiss
TC: 25 +5s delay

http://wordpress.cvining.com/north-van-city-championships-2018/

 

April 28-29, 2018

Guelph Spring Pro-Am
Peter Clark Hall, Guelph University, ON

5 round swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.chesscanada.info/forum/showthread.php?4677-Guelph-Spring-Pro-Am-April-28-29&p=28534#post28534


  


 May 2018

May 5, 2018 

Eagle Minds bi-monthly Active
Burlington, ON

U1600
5 round swiss
TC: G/25

http://eaglemindschess.weebly.com/bi-monthly-tournaments.html 

 

May 5, 2018 

McGill Open Rapid
New Residence Hall, McGill, Montréal

Open and U1800
5 round swiss
TC: 25 + 5

http://chess.ca/newsfeed/node/1045


May 5, 2018 

Soo Spring Active
Centennial Public Library, Sault Ste. Marie

5 round swiss
TC: 25 + 2 sec delay

http://www.miltonchess.ca/images/cfc/2018%20soo%20active%20unrated.pdf

 

May 5-6, 2018

Arnprior Open
Arnprior Library, Arnprior, ON

5 rd swiss
90 + 30

https://eoca.ca/#/

 

May 5-6, 2018

Edmonton International Qualifier
Edmonton Chess Club

Details: TBA

Organizer: Jordan Rohatynski


May 6, 2018

Manitoba Scholastic Championship
University of Manitoba, St. Paul's Belltower Café

K-12 children only

https://chess.chessmanitoba.org/?page_id=34

 


 May 11-12, 2018

50th Ontario High School Chess Championship
Tartu College, Toronto

Deadline for Entries: April 12, 2018.

http://www.ohscc.on.ca/

 

May 11-13, 2018

Nova Scotia Open
Saint Mary’s University, Halifax

5 round swiss
TC: 120 + 30

http://www.nschess.ca/?p=1127

 

May 12, 2018

BC Elementary Chess Tournament
St.George's Elementary School, Vancouver 

contact: wcjchess@hotmail.com

 

May 12-13, 2018

Alberta Seniors Chess Championship
Calgary Chess Club

Alberta residents 50+ years old as of Dec. 31, 2018.

5 round swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.albertachess.org/2018ASC.php

Alberta Women's Championship
Calgary Chess Club

5 round swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://www.albertachess.org/2018AWC.php

 


 May 19, 2018

NYYCC and GP
St. Timothy Catholic School,  North York, ON

U8-U18
5 round swiss
TC: G/25

https://senecahillchess.com/2017/11/08/2018-nyycc-and-gp/


May 19-21, 2018 

 

Ontario Open
Annex Chess Club, 918 Bathurst St., Toronto

6 round swiss
TC: 90 + 30

http://annexchessclub.com/2018-ontario-open/

 

43rd Keres Memorial 
Executive Airport Plaza Hotel, Richmond, BC

6 round swiss
TC: 100 + 30

$5000 guaranteed

http://keresmemorial.pbworks.com/w/page/1785469/FrontPage

 


 May 25-27, 2018

Open de Sherbrooke
Aréna Julien-Ducharme, Sherbrooke

Système suisse de 5 rondes.
Cad: 1h15/30 coups + 40min./mat, incrément de 30s par coup.

http://www.echecs-sherbrooke.com/open.php


May 26-27, 2018

2018 Charlottetown Open
UPEI, Charlottetown

5 round swiss
TC: 120 + 30s delay

http://mcc.cdevastation.com/charop18.html


May 26-27, 2018

2018 Aron Kaptsan Memorial Sectionals
Manitoba

Details: TBA

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: April 2, 2018, 1:46 am

The 2018 Candidates tournament finished in Berlin this week, with Fabiano Caruana winning his last two games to top the field with +5 = 8 -1 and earn a match with World Champion Magnus Carlsen in November in London. 

This year's Candidates may well have been the most exciting ever: with very combative play from most of the players (especially Kramnik), few short draws, 20 of the 56 games being decisive, and four players in the running for 1st place going into the last round.

While all eyes ended up on Caruana, it's also worth looking at those who did not earn a World Championship match this week. At the top (bottom) of that list is Lev Aronian, who finished last with +1 = 7 - 6, and lost 30 FIDE rating points to drop from 5th to 13th in the world. While this may not be the end of Aronian's title hopes, it is another missed opporunity for the 35-year old, and another Candidate's failure on his resume: 

  • 2007 - Mexico: 6/14, 2nd last place in Championship tournament.
  • 2011 - Kazan: lost to Grischuk in the 1/4 finals (rapid TB games)
  • 2013 - London: 8/14, =3rd-4th.
  • 2014 - Khanty-Mansiysk:  6.5 /14, 2nd last place
  • 2015 - Baku: eliminated in round 2 of World Cup qualifier by Alex Areschenko, but...
  • 2016 - Moscow: ...gets into Candidates as sponsor's wildcard; finishes =4th-7th of 8.
  • 2018 - Berlin: 4.5/14, last place. 

Our Best of the Web this week focuses on two great players who, despite their best efforts, never got to play a match against the world's best player.... 


 Paul Morphy (1837-1884)

Admittedly, there was no official World Championship in Morphy's day, but everyone knew who the best players were and where to find them. So, after winning the US Championship in 1857, and unable to practice law in Louisanna until he was over 23, Morphy sailed to Europe to challenge the world's best.

The one player Morphy didn't get to play was the one he crossed the Atlantic for: Howard Staunton. Staunton had been considered Europe's best player since winning a match in 1843 against France's leading player (Saint-Amant) and winning several matches after that. But Staunton avoided playing Morphy, and blamed their failure to meet on Morphy. 

So Morphy played other European masters and defeated everyone who dared play him: Löwenthal (+9 =2 -3), Harrwitz (+5 =1 -2), de Riviere (+9 =0 -3). Most importantly, he beat Adolf Anderssen (+7 =2 -2), who had been recognzed as Europe's top player since winning the first international tournament in London in 1851, beating Staunton +4 =0 -1 in the semi-final along the way. 

The Staunton-Morphy affair has long been a sour-tasting "what if" for chess fans, but from a modern perspective it is hard to understand the fuss. In 1858 Staunton was famous as a chess writer and for the piece design that still bears his name, but his major playing success was 15 years in the past, he was crushed by Anderssen in 1851, he hadn't played a serious match in 5 years, and his only recent tournament (Birmingham 1858) was a flop (eliminated 2-0 in the 2nd round by the runner-up). With such a record, it is strange to modern eyes that anyone would think the 48-year-old Staunton would be a worthy adversay for Morphy, and not vice-versa, as Staunton had tried to make it seem.

Morphy's trip to Europe, the matches, and the Staunton affair are chronicled -- not wholly without admiraing bias -- in "The Exploits and Triumphs, in Europe, of Paul Morphy, the Chess Champion" by Morphy's secretary and travelling companion, Frederick Milnes Edge.

The book is in the public domain, and can be downloaded and listened to thanks to LibreVox, a site which collects and encourages the recording of public domain audio books. 

Like all LibreVox recordings, the mp3s are free, but they vary in quality: the readers are not professional, but are devoted fans. In this case, you can expect a few appalling mispronunciations of French towns and names, but the story comes through unscathed, and you can enjoy it while driving to a tournament this summer. Time: 5 hrs 38 min.

https://librivox.org/paul-morphy-the-chess-champion-by-frederick-milnes-edge/

Suggestion: unless you are an extreme chess junkie, follow the author's invitation to "skip" chapters 4 and 5 on "Chess in England": long-time club players may recognize a theme in the moveable feast that is the history of London chess clubs, but the rest of the story is more enjoyable.


 Paul Keres (1916-75)

For the 100th anniversary of Paul Keres's birth, Chess24.com published an 8-part biography and games collection of the great Estonian. The last part appeared in January 2018, and the whole series is now available online (link below). The series is by Joosep Grents, a History BA from Charles University. It has plenty of high-quality photos, clickable games, and lots of chess history.

Paul Keres was a three-time Soviet Champion, one of the very best players in the world from the late 1930s through late 1960s, but never got a match for the World Championship.

Keres won the 1938 AVRO tournament (=1st with Reuben Fine, but ahead on TB), and was in negotiaitons for a match with World Champion Alexander Alekhine when WW2 started. Alekhine died in 1946 while still Champion, and Keres finished 3rd at the 1948 World Championship tournament in the Hague and Moscow, which Botvinnik won to take over the vacant title.

Keres finished 2nd at the next four Candidates Tournaments: Zeurich '53; Amsterdam 1956; Bled 1959; and Curacao 1962. The winners of each of the last three went on to defeat the World Champion, Mikhail Botvinnik. At the 1959 Candidates Tournament, Keres scored 18½/28 but still finished 1½ points behind Tal, despite beating Tal +3 =0-1 in their four games. Tal, of course, went on to beat Botvinnik in 1960, becoming the youngest World Champion. 

Keres died at the age of 59 while on his way home after winning a tournament in Vancouver, now the "Keres Memorial".

The Best link to the 8-part series is to the last article in the series, as it has links to all seven earlier parts:

https://chess24.com/en/read/news/paul-keres-viii-gulliver-among-the-lilliputians

PS: Keres was also an exceptional annotator. If you can find it, check out "Power Chess: Great Grandmaster Battles from Russia", a collection of 21 games (+1 study) he annotated for Chess Life between 1968-75, or the recently translated and published "World Chess Championship 1948" which Kasparov praised highly, (review here).

 


 2018 Grenke Chess Classic
March 31-April 9, 2018 

The Grenke Chess Classic hosts two major events starting this weekend: an Open Swiss with over 1560 players (and counting), and a 10-player RR featuring Carlsen, Caruana, Aronian, Anand and MVL. While the RR can't hope to be as thrilling as the 2018 Candidates, it has the first (and only?) match up between World Champion Magnus Carlsen and Challenger Fabiano Caruana before their World Championship match in London in November. It also gives perennial also-ran Lev Aronian a chance to rebound...

http://www.grenkechessclassic.de/en/

 

Author: John Upper
Posted: March 28, 2018, 9:54 pm