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Live games with analysis
Author: chessdom
Posted: December 5, 2017, 6:30 am
Live games with analysis
Author: chessdom
Posted: November 17, 2017, 9:37 pm
Live games with computer analysis
Author: chessdom
Posted: November 13, 2017, 3:15 pm
Live games with analysis
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Posted: November 9, 2017, 6:24 pm
Live games with analysis
Author: chessdom
Posted: October 7, 2017, 8:24 am
Chess.com Isle of Man 2017 live with analysis
Author: chessdom
Posted: September 28, 2017, 7:24 am
Live games with computer analysis
Author: chessdom
Posted: September 25, 2017, 9:15 am
1121 participants, live games with analysys
Author: chessdom
Posted: September 5, 2017, 11:06 am
Live games with analysis
Author: chessdom
Posted: August 22, 2017, 12:15 pm
Live from the opening ceremony, rapid and blitz
Author: chessdom
Posted: August 18, 2017, 1:16 pm

Canadian Chess Newsfeed

"Fewer pieces create fewer problems."

That's the quote at the start of Laszlo Polgar's "Chess Endgames", a fat collection of 4560 thematically-organized endgame positions which (as Laszlo well-knew) showed just how many problems remain even when very few pieces remain. Positions 4423-4446 in Polgar's book are RB vs RB of opposite colour endings. He might consider adding these games to any future edition of his collection...

Our two positions come from top boards of Round 4 at last weekend's RA December Open. Both were RB vs RB with opposite-coloured Bs. The general wisdom is that opposite coloured Bs increase attacking chances in the middlegame, but they increase the drawing margin in endgames. The reason is the same for both conclusions -- neither B can oppose the other  -- so an attack supported by the B will have one more attacker than defender, and (in the endgame) a blockade on the colour of one B cannot be broken by a B on the other colour. Because of the awkward position of the white Kings in our two examples they feature both themes: mating tactics and defensive blockades.

The coloured circles in the lower left corner of the diagrams indicate the player to move. Take some time to at least come up with some ideas before looking at the games and analysis...

..

() - ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "RA December Open"]
[Site "RA Centre"]
[Date "2017.12.10"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Collins, Christian"]
[Black "Gordon, David"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B32"]
[WhiteElo "2015"]
[BlackElo "2291"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "5B2/8/8/8/2pk1p2/5Pp1/2r1b1P1/R5K1 w - - 0 59"]
[PlyCount "20"]
[EventDate "2017.??.??"]

{Both players were under 2 minutes (plus 30 second increment) for the
remainder of the game, so any mistakes should be judged with that in mind....
and remembered, as a reason to polish our endgame skills so that we don't have
to calculate these positions from scratch with little time at the end of a
long game.} 59. Bd6 {Only move.} {Threatening Bxf4, which could cover the potential
promotion on c1 and win the g3-pawn.} Ke3 ({It helps to know that the ending of
RB vs R is a draw, but it's a difficult draw which has often been lost even by
2700+ GMs. Knowing this, Black and White could go for this ending -- to see
who knows it better -- with the following:} 59... c3 60. Bxf4 Rb2 61. Bxg3 c2
62. Ra4+ Bc4 63. Bf4 Rb1+ {and winning the B; but (as mentioned) this should
be a draw even if Black wins both of White's pawns.}) 60. Bc5+ {Only move.} Kd3 (60...
Kd2 61. Bd6 c3 62. Bxf4+ $11) 61. Bd6 Bxf3 $5 {Clearly Black's best try to win.
The position is still objectively drawn, but now White will have to solve some
different problems.} (61... c3 62. Bxf4 $11 Rd2 $5 63. Rc1 c2 64. Bxd2 Kxd2 65.
Rxc2+ Kxc2 66. f4 $1 $11 {is a draw: White gives up the f-pawn then oscilates
his K between h1 and g1 so Black's K can't get close enough to attack g2
without creating stalemate.}) 62. gxf3 $11 (62. Ra3+ {also draws:} c3 63. gxf3
Ke3 64. Ra4 Kxf3 65. Rxf4+ {Only move.} $11) 62... Ke3 63. Re1+ {Not White's only move,
but forcing, which is a bonus when in time trouble.} Kxf3 64. Rf1+ {Only move.} Kg4 (
64... Rf2 65. Rxf2+ gxf2+ 66. Kf1 $11) 65. Rxf4+ Kh3 {[#]White has more than
one way to hold this, but the ideas behind the different defences are not
obvious.} 66. Rf1 $4 {The most natural, but actually losing!} (66. Be7 $1 $11 {
threatening Rh4#} Rc1+ $5 (66... g2 67. Rf3+ $1 {driving the K away} Kg4 68.
Rf2 $11 {forking the Rc2 and g2 pawn will either win the g2 pawn or force off
Rs, allowing White to draw by stopping the g-pawn with his K and the c-pawn
with his B.}) 67. Rf1 Rc3 $1 {Preventing the Rf3 check from the previous line,
but it's still not enough to win.} 68. Rf4 $6 {Threatening mate on h4, but
allowing Black to go to an ending with some winning chances with} (68. Re1 $11)
(68. Bf6 $11) 68... g2 {Now White doesn't have the third-rank check to force
the Black K away. Even so, White can save the game with another mate threat:}
69. Kf2 {Only move.} $11 Rc2+ 70. Kf3 {Only move.} g1=N+ $1 $15 {Black is nominally better, but RN
v R is easy to defend, so White can sac the B for the pawn and draw.} ({
Of course, not} 70... g1=Q $4 71. Rh4#) (70... Kh2 71. Bc5 $11 {threatening
mate again!})) ({White can hold this another way:} 66. Rf8 $1 {Think of it
like this: assume the B will sac itself for the c-pawn, and the R defends the
g-pawn as in Philidor's defence (in RP vs R): when the pawn goes to the sixth
rank the attacking K has nowhere to hide, so the defending R goes behind it
and checks the attacking K perpetually.} Rc1+ (66... c3 67. Rh8+) (66... g2 67.
Rf3+ Kg4 68. Rg3+ $11) 67. Rf1 Rc3 68. Rf8 g2 69. Rh8+ $11) 66... Rg2+ {Only move.} {
The critical tempo-gaining tactic: Black forces the white K to step onto a
square which is vulnerable to the ...g2+ fork, and so gains time to put the R
on a more active square.} 67. Kh1 Rd2 {Double Attack: Xd6 and X...g2.} 68. Bxg3
Kxg3 (68... Kxg3 69. Rc1 Rd3 $1 {the back rank mate protects the c-pawn and
the White K is too far away and cut off to stop it from promoting.} 70. Kg1 c3
71. Kf1 Kf3 (71... Re3 72. Re1 Kf3 $19) 72. Ke1 Ke3 $19) 0-1



[Event "RA December Open"]
[Site "RA Centre"]
[Date "2017.12.10"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Demchenko, Svitlana"]
[Black "Villeneuve, Robert"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A41"]
[WhiteElo "2288"]
[BlackElo "2046"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "8/PR6/6pp/1P4k1/2Bb1p2/7P/1r6/7K b - - 0 42"]
[PlyCount "16"]
[EventDate "2017.??.??"]

42... f3 $1 (42... Rb1+ $6 43. Kg2 Ra1 44. b6 Bxb6 45. Rxb6 Rxa7 $14 {Black
has good drawing chances since RB vs R is a theoretical (but challenging) draw.
}) 43. Re7 {Only move.} $11 {White must defend against ...Be5.} (43. a8=Q $4 Rb1+ 44. Bf1
Rxf1+ 45. Kh2 Be5#) 43... Kh4 $4 {Black looks to set up a mating net.
Unfortunately for him, White has a saving resource consisting of "only moves"
which, while not obvious a few moves ago, aren't terribly hard to find when
everything else loses immediately. Instead, Black had two ways to draw, both
of which have tactical subtleties:} (43... Rb1+ 44. Kh2 Ra1 $11 {collecting
the a-pawn saves the game, but doesn't give Black winning chances:} 45. h4+ $5
{is similar to Kg3, but has a devilish trap} (45. Kg3 f2 46. h4+ Kf5 (46... Kh5
$4 47. Be2#) 47. Rf7+ Ke5 48. Re7+ Kd6 49. Re6+ Kc5 50. Rc6+ Kb4 51. b6 Bxb6
52. Rxb6+ Kxc4 53. Kxf2 $11) 45... Kf4 $4 (45... Kf5 46. Kg3 $11 {transposes
to the previous line.}) (45... Kxh4 $4 46. Re4+ Kg5 47. Rxd4 $18) 46. Bd3 {Only move.}
$18 Be5 (46... Bf6 47. Re4+ Kf5 {Only move.} 48. Ra4+ $18 {cuts off the black R and
supports promotion on a8.}) 47. Rxe5 $3 Kxe5 48. b6 $18 {and the rook can't
stop both pawns.}) ({Interestingly, during the postmortem none of us suggested
...Rg2, perhaps because we all thought Black was playing for the win:} 43...
Rg2 $1 {sets up a drawing mechanism on g1 and g2 to force a draw. White has
ways to try to trick Black, but if he sees through them it's equal:} 44. Re5+
$5 {another nice trick} (44. a8=Q {shows the drawing mechanism:} Rg1+ 45. Kh2
Rg2+ 46. Kh1 $11) (44. Re1 $2 {stops the drawing mechanism but at the cost of
giving away White's only trump to} Bxa7 $19 {and Black wins.}) (44. h4+ $5 {
gives Black a chance to go wrong:} Kxh4 45. Re4+ Kg3 (45... Kh3 $4 46. Rxd4 $1
$18 (46. Bf1 {also wins.})) 46. Rg4+ {Only move.} Kxg4 47. a8=Q Rg1+ 48. Kh2 Rg2+ $11)
44... Kf4 $4 (44... Kf6 {Only move.} $11) 45. Re4+ {Fork and Decoy.} Kxe4 (45... Kg3 46.
Rg4+ {Only move.} Kxh3 47. Rxd4 $18) 46. a8=Q+ Kf4 47. Qf8+ Kg3 48. Qd6+ {Only move.} $18 {wins
the B and so ends the mate/perpetual threats.}) 44. Re4+ {Only move.} $18 Kg3 45. Rg4+ {Only move.}
Kxh3 46. Bf1+ {Only move.} Kxg4 47. a8=Q $18 Be5 (47... Kg3 48. Qb8+ {Only move.} $18) 48. Qe4+ Bf4
49. Qxg6+ Kh4 50. Qf6+ {Wins the R and the game.} 1-0
merida
46

..

Author: John Upper
Posted: December 17, 2017, 7:19 am

Karjakin - Nakamura in the chess.com Blitz Championship semi-final, Jeremy Silman annotating games played by four Canadians, and whatever is becoming of Alexandra Botez... are this week's Best of the Web.


Chess.com Speed Chess Championship: Nakamura vs Karjakin
Dec. 16, 2017. (9am Pacific, noon EST)

Hikaru Nakamura and Sergey Karjakin meet in the semi-final of the 2017 Chess.com Speed Chess Championship.

The winner plays defending Champion Magnus Carlsen, who beat Alexander Grischuk 15.5 - 10.5 in the other semi-final.

The format for the Chess.com matches is 3 hours of online play, broken into four formats:

  1. 90 minutes of 5+2 blitz, 
  2. 60 minutes of 3+2 blitz,
  3. 30 minutes of 1+1 bullet,
  4. one chess960 game in each time control. 
Nakamura is the favourite in the bullet portion, but Karjakin gives nothing away in the other time controls, and his patience and ability to hold passive positions might turn out to be the resourceful but risk-seeking Nakamura's kryptonite. 
Live Games (commentary by IM Danny Rensch and ...? could be GM Eric Hansen or GM Robert Hess)

https://www.chess.com/tv

http://www.twitch.tv/Chess


Jeremy Silman annotates three games by four Canadians

IM Jeremy Silman is the author of "How to Reassess Your Chess" and "Silman's Endgame Course", both of which are excellent and aimed at getting class players up to and beyond expert level. 

Silman also writes a regular column on Chess.com where he answers readers' questions. His most recent post includes analysis of three games by "Animaul7", who is Canadian junior Anthony Maulucci. All three games were played at the 2017 Aurora Fall Open. His opponents are: Mark Plotkin (2343), Sam Marin (2125), and Dorian Kang (2017). Silman's notes to the Nimzo pawn structure in the Marin game are particularly detailed.

https://www.chess.com/article/view/how-can-an-expert-become-a-master


Alexandra Botez on "Planet of the Apps"

Canadian expert Alexandra Botez plays a lot less chess than she did before university, though she does occasionally stream online games (hand and brain), news summaries on Chess.com, and appeared as an alumna at the 2017 Susan Polgar Foundation Girl's Invitational.

She's graduated from Stanford -- where she was the first-ever female president of the chess club -- and is developing an app called "Crowdamp", which is designed to help social-media taste-makers interact with their followers more efficiently and more directly. 

Planet of the Apps is an online reality show similar to Dragon's Den and Shark Tank: hopeful entrepreneurs pitch a product idea to experts -- here, it's Jessica Alba, will.i.am, Gwyneth Paltrow and Gary Vaynerchuk -- hoping that one of them will like it enough to mentor them before they do a second pitch to potential investors. The title comes from the fact that all of the pitches are about apps: smart phone applications. It's produced by Apple and can be seen on Apple Music, and elsewhere. 

Alexandra and her codeveloper Ruben Meyer pitch their app during episode 7, which you can watch on Apple Music, or by following the link below.

times: (when Alexandra and Ruben are on) 

  • 12:40 - Introduction
  • 13:21 - initial pitch
  • 28:33 - meet with mentor team
  • 40:50 - investors pitch (screencap above)
Note: there will be popups and/or redirects from the link below -- that's how they pay for their bandwidth. I use a popup blocker, but there are still a couple of redirects. Just keep clicking or double-clicking.

https://www.mehlizmovies.is/fullepisodes/planet-apps-season-1-episode-7/

Category:

Author: John Upper
Posted: December 16, 2017, 3:34 am

AlphaZero vs Stockfish 

On December 5, 2017, Google DeepMind announced that it had developed an automated learning program -- AlphaZero (hereafter AZ)-- which trained itself to play Go, and chess, and Shogi in only a few hours and then decisively beat the world's best programs at each: 

    • beat Elmo at Shogi: +90 =2 -8
    • beat AlphaGO at Go: +60 =0 -40 (there are no draws in Go)
    • beat Stockfish at Chess: +28 =72 -0.

This result follows DeepMind's previous high-profile successes in mastering Go, decades before many experts thought that would be possible:

    1. March 2016: AlphaGo defeated 18-time Go World Champion Lee Sedol: 4-1.
    2. May 2017: AlphaGo defeated current world #1 Go player Ke Jie: 3-0.
    3. October 2017: AlphaGo Zero defeated AlphaGo by a score of 100-0.

    The paper, which has not been peer-reviewed, describing the experiment, along with 10 games between AlphaZero and Stockfish can be downloaded here.

    We'll have more on this in a few days, including:

    Q: Did AZ really take only 4 hours to learn chess?
    A: Yes. Not counting the years of development in creating self-learning algorithms and the super-fast hardware to run them.

    Q: Are these 10 games a fair representation of AZ's chess ability?
    A: Obviously not: AZ scored 64% in the match, but scores 100% in the published sample.

    Q: Was this a fair test for Stockfish?
    A: No. There are objections to the lack of opening book, no endgame tablebases, the unusual time control, the exceptionally low level of memory cache allowed to Stockfish relative to the number of threads it ran on, the fact that they used a year-old version of the constantly changing program...

    Q: So, is AlphaZero not stronger than Stockfish?
    A: It is clearly much stronger, though probably by less than the 64-36 score indicates.

    Q: But their paper says SF was analyzing way more positions per second than AZ, doesn't that mean SF had an advantage?
    A: No. It means SF and AZ spend their calculating time differently: SF looks at lots of positions, AZ applies more time-consuming evaluations to each position.

    Q: When will I be able to buy AlphaZero for chess?
    A: Don't hold your breath. Google DeepMind did not sell the programs it made for Go, and (even if it did) they all run on hardware that goes about 1000 times faster than you could run on a desktop CPU with an AMD Ryzen 9.

    Q: Will AlphaZero StockPicker revolutionize investing?
    A: Not for long, if at all. Stock markets, unlike boardgames, are chaotic type-2 systems: choices made by agents affect the system in unpredictable ways...

    Q: Was it just a coincidence that the first round of the 2017 London Chess Classic was played at the home of Google DeepMind the same week as their paper about AlphaZero was published?
    A: 🙂 


    Chess Games First

    There are many interesting things about this story, some of which we may return to here. But, as chess-lovers, the most interesting thing about the story is that there is now a chess-playing entity which is several orders of magnitude better than the best publicly-available programs, which are themselves several orders of magnitude better than the best human players, and that (some of) its games are available. So what does it play like??

    All 10 games, with notes, can be replayed in the viewer below. If you need some encouraging, how about 7-time Russian Champion Peter Svidler:

    "The games were absolutely fantastic, phenomenal.... I'm not amazed with the fact that it learned chess, but I was stunned by the games' quality."

    I think all 10 games are worth playing through, but if you're short of time, then play at least the following three:

    1. game 3: a QID where AZ sacrifices a pawn and an exchange to trap Black's Q on h8 and win by zugzwang.
    2. game 10: another QID, where AZ allows a N to be captured at move 19 just to gain a development lead which doesn't turn into a (humanly) clear win until after move 33.
    3. game 7: Karpov 2.0: no fireworks, but a Karpov-like win where AZ didn't seem to do anything... until its opponent was lost.

    () - ()
     
     Round:  Result:
    [Event "AlphaZero vs. Stockfish"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2017.12.04"]
    [Round "1.1"]
    [White "Stockfish 8"]
    [Black "AlphaZero"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "C65"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "134"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    [Source "CFC Newsfeed"]
    [SourceDate "2017.12.08"]
    [WhiteTeam "Norway"]
    [BlackTeam "England"]
    [WhiteTeamCountry "NOR"]
    [BlackTeamCountry "ENG"]
    
    {The Power of the Bishop Pair} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. Bxc6
    dxc6 6. O-O Nd7 7. Nbd2 O-O 8. Qe1 $146 (8. Nc4 f6 9. Kh1 a5 10. Nh4 Nb6 11.
    Be3 Bd4 12. Nxb6 cxb6 13. Qc1 Be6 14. f4 exf4 15. Bxd4 Qxd4 16. Rxf4 c5 17. Rf1
    a4 $15 {1/2-1/2 (46) Yu,Y (2729)-Cheparinov,I (2689) Doha 2016}) 8... f6 9. Nc4
    Rf7 10. a4 Bf8 11. Kh1 Nc5 12. a5 Ne6 13. Ncxe5 fxe5 14. Nxe5 Rf6 15. Ng4 Rf7
    16. Ne5 Re7 17. a6 c5 18. f4 Qe8 19. axb7 Bxb7 $15 20. Qa5 Nd4 21. Qc3 Re6 22.
    Be3 Rb6 23. Nc4 Rb4 24. b3 {Diagram [#]} a5 $1 {Black could keep the a-pawn
    with ...a6, but it would be indefinitely weak (tying down the LSB) and Black's
    Ra8 doesn't have particularly good prospects since there are no open file.
    Sacing the a-pawn looks good for both the Ra8 and the LSB.} 25. Rxa5 (25. Bxd4
    cxd4 26. Qxd4 a4 $15) 25... Rxa5 26. Nxa5 Ba6 27. Bxd4 Rxd4 28. Nc4 Rd8 29. g3
    h6 30. Qa5 Bc8 31. Qxc7 {Diagram [#]White has four pawns and a N for the B
    pair... but even my laptop SF8 rates Black as better. White would have much
    better drawing chances if his f and g-pawns were back on the second rank.} Bh3
    $1 $15 32. Rg1 Rd7 33. Qe5 Qxe5 34. Nxe5 Ra7 35. Nc4 g5 36. Rc1 Bg7 37. Ne5 Ra8
    38. Nf3 Bb2 39. Rb1 Bc3 40. Ng1 Bd7 41. Ne2 Bd2 42. Rd1 (42. Kg2 Ra2 $19) 42...
    Be3 43. Kg2 Bg4 44. Re1 Bd2 45. Rf1 Ra2 $19 (45... Bxe2 46. Rf2 Bxd3 47. cxd3
    Be3 $15) 46. h3 (46. Ng1 Be3 $19) 46... Bxe2 47. Rf2 Bxf4 48. Rxe2 Be5 {
    White has three pawns for the B, but Black's B completely controls the b, c, d,
    and e-pawns.} 49. Rf2 Kg7 50. g4 Bd4 51. Re2 Kf6 52. e5+ (52. Kf3 Ke6 (52...
    Ke5 $4 53. c3 $1 $14) 53. Kg2 Ke5 54. Kf3 Ra1 $19) 52... Bxe5 53. Kf3 Ra1 54.
    Rf2 Re1 55. Kg2+ Bf4 {It might be silly to talk about "style" here, but AZ so
    often plays for domination by the minors, even when other options seem as good;
    as here} (55... Ke6 {also wins, but gives White's R some freedom,} 56. Rf8 Re2+
    57. Kf3 Rxc2 $19) 56. c3 Rc1 57. d4 Rxc3 58. dxc5 Rxc5 59. b4 Rc3 60. h4 Ke5
    61. hxg5 hxg5 62. Re2+ Kf6 63. Kf2 Be5 64. Ra2 Rc4 65. Ra6+ Ke7 66. Ra5 Ke6 67.
    Ra6+ Bd6 0-1
    
    [Event "AlphaZero vs. Stockfish"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2017.12.04"]
    [Round "1.2"]
    [White "Stockfish 8"]
    [Black "AlphaZero"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "C65"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "174"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    [Source "CFC Newsfeed"]
    [SourceDate "2017.12.08"]
    [WhiteTeam "Norway"]
    [BlackTeam "England"]
    [WhiteTeamCountry "NOR"]
    [BlackTeamCountry "ENG"]
    
    {NO DRAW FOR YOU!  AZ avoids repetitions twice before outplaying SF8} 1. e4 e5
    2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. Bxc6 dxc6 {Diagram [#]} 6. O-O (6. Nbd2 O-O
    7. Qe2 Re8 8. Nc4 Nd7 9. Rg1 Bb4+ 10. Bd2 Bxd2+ 11. Qxd2 Qf6 {Giri,A (2762)
    -Jakovenko,D (2721) Palma de Mallorca 2017 (½-½, 35)}) 6... Nd7 7. c3 O-O 8.
    d4 Bd6 9. Bg5 Qe8 10. Re1 f6 11. Bh4 Qf7 $146 (11... Nb6 12. Nbd2 Bg4 13. Qc2
    Kh8 14. Bg3 Nd7 15. Nh4 Qf7 {1/2-1/2 (31) Balogh,C (2638)-Parligras,M (2603)
    Achaea 2017}) 12. Nbd2 a5 13. Bg3 Re8 14. Qc2 Nf8 15. c4 c5 16. d5 b6 17. Nh4
    g6 18. Nhf3 Bd7 19. Rad1 Re7 20. h3 Qg7 21. Qc3 Rae8 22. a3 h6 {Diagram [#]NO
    DRAW FOR YOU  An extremely blocked position, the kind that has long been a
    problem for engines. SF8 doesn't seem to see anything to do and starts what
    looks like an attempt at repetition...} 23. Bh4 Rf7 24. Bg3 Rfe7 25. Bh4 Rf7
    26. Bg3 a4 {... and Black declines!?  20 years ago, a paranoid GM as White
    might accuse the the programmers behind Black of outside interference, but
    today everybody knows there are less nefarious explanations:  .  1. Black had
    more time to analyze this position, and may have come to a different
    evaluation about it because of the extra analysis;  .  2. AZ might have
    created its equivalent of a "contempt value", such that it rates draws from an
    equal position as a sub-optimal outcome, and so will play into slightly
    inferior lines to avoid repetitions in positions it may otherwise rate as 0.00.
    } 27. Kh1 Rfe7 28. Bh4 Rf7 29. Bg3 Rfe7 30. Bh4 g5 {...and again, Black avoids
    the repetition.} 31. Bg3 Ng6 32. Nf1 Rf7 33. Ne3 Ne7 34. Qd3 {At 26 ply (less
    than what SF8 should have reached in this match) my version of SF8 rates this
    as a mistake, preferring both Qc2 (where it eyes a4) and Nd2 (possibly heading
    to c3).} h5 35. h4 Nc8 {Beginning a nice maneuver to put the N on d6 and
    activate the B on h6.} 36. Re2 g4 37. Nd2 Qh7 38. Kg1 Bf8 39. Nb1 Nd6 40. Nc3
    Bh6 41. Rf1 Ra8 42. Kh2 Kf8 43. Kg1 Qg6 {Diagram [#] I don't know what Black
    would do if White sits with Kh2, but the move played in the game (f2-f4) leads
    to mass liquidations and an endgame where the Nd6 and the targets on c4 and e4
    leave Black clearly better.} 44. f4 $6 (44. Rc2 Bxe3 45. fxe3 $17) (44. Kh2 $5)
    44... gxf3 45. Rxf3 Bxe3+ 46. Rfxe3 Ke7 47. Be1 Qh7 48. Rg3 Rg7 49. Rxg7+ Qxg7
    50. Re3 Rg8 51. Rg3 Qh8 52. Nb1 Rxg3 53. Bxg3 Qh6 54. Nd2 Bg4 {Diagram [#]} 55.
    Kh2 (55. Kf2 Bd1 {the B goes to b3 attacking c4; if White takes then Black's Q
    will get into White's position.}) 55... Kd7 (55... Bd1 $17 56. Nf1 Bb3 57. Ne3
    Qg6 58. Nf5+ Nxf5 59. exf5 Qg4 $19) 56. b3 axb3 57. Nxb3 Qg6 58. Nd2 Bd1 59.
    Nf3 Ba4 60. Nd2 Ke7 61. Bf2 Qg4 62. Qf3 {Diagram [#]The rest is easier than it
    might look: White's c4 and e4 pawns are too weak.} Bd1 63. Qxg4 (63. Qd3 Qe2)
    63... Bxg4 64. a4 Nb7 65. Nb1 Na5 66. Be3 Nxc4 67. Bc1 Bd7 68. Nc3 c6 69. Kg1
    cxd5 70. exd5 Bf5 71. Kf2 Nd6 72. Be3 {Diagram [#]} Ne4+ 73. Nxe4 Bxe4 74. a5
    bxa5 75. Bxc5+ Kd7 76. d6 Bf5 (76... Bc6 77. Bb6 a4 78. Bc5 Ke6 $19) 77. Ba3
    Kc6 78. Ke1 Kd5 79. Kd2 Ke4 80. Bb2 Kf4 81. Bc1 Kg3 82. Ke2 a4 83. Kf1 Kxh4 84.
    Kf2 Kg4 85. Ba3 Bd7 86. Bc1 Kf5 87. Ke3 Ke6 0-1
    
    [Event "AlphaZero vs. Stockfish"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2017.12.04"]
    [Round "1.3"]
    [White "AlphaZero"]
    [Black "Stockfish 8"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "E15"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "119"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    [Source "CFC Newsfeed"]
    [SourceDate "2017.12.08"]
    [WhiteTeam "England"]
    [BlackTeam "Norway"]
    [WhiteTeamCountry "ENG"]
    [BlackTeamCountry "NOR"]
    
    {QID ZUGZWANG    Six of the 10 published games in the AZ SF8 match were
    Queen's Indians, all with AZ as White.  This is the one that will go into
    anthologies.} 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 b6 3. d4 e6 4. g3 Ba6 5. Qc2 c5 6. d5 $1 {
    Diagram [#] This pawn sac is the modern mainline: it frees f5 for a piece and
    tactics on the long diagonal make it awkward for Black to finish queenside
    development.} exd5 7. cxd5 Bb7 8. Bg2 Nxd5 9. O-O Nc6 10. Rd1 Be7 11. Qf5 (11.
    Qa4 Nf6 12. Nh4 O-O 13. Nc3 g6 14. Bg5 Rb8 15. Bf4 Rc8 16. Bh6 Re8 17. Qf4 Na5
    18. Nf5 Bxg2 19. Nxe7+ Qxe7 20. Kxg2 Qe5 21. e3 d5 22. Bg5 Ne4 23. Rxd5 Qxf4
    24. gxf4 Nxc3 25. bxc3 Kg7 26. Rd7 $16 {1-0 (83) Aronian,L (2786)-Nakamura,H 
    (2790) Moscow 2016}) 11... Nf6 12. e4 g6 13. Qf4 O-O 14. e5 Nh5 {Diagram [#]
    It may be worth reminding readers that neither engine was using an opening
    book, but were finding these moves as the result of calculation.} 15. Qg4 (15.
    Qc4 Re8 16. Nc3 Ng7 17. Nd5 Ne6 18. Be3 Nb4 19. Nf4 Qc8 20. a3 Bxf3 21. Bxf3
    Nc6 22. Qc3 Ncd4 23. Bxd4 cxd4 24. Qd3 Rb8 25. Rac1 Qd8 26. Nxe6 dxe6 27. Bc6
    Rf8 28. Qxd4 Qxd4 29. Rxd4 Rfc8 $11 {1/2-1/2 (41) Shirov,A (2715)-Leko,P (2707)
    Skopje 2015}) 15... Re8 $146 (15... d5 16. exd6 Bf6 17. Nc3 Nd4 18. Nxd4 Bxg2
    19. Nf5 Bc6 20. d7 Qc7 21. Nd5 Bxd5 22. Rxd5 Rfd8 23. Be3 Bxb2 24. Nh6+ Kf8 25.
    Rad1 Bg7 26. Rxh5 gxh5 27. Qf5 {1-0 (27) Carlsen,M (2690)-Ivanchuk,V (2750)
    Monte Carlo (rapid) 2007}) 16. Nc3 Qb8 17. Nd5 Bf8 18. Bf4 Qc8 19. h3 Ne7 20.
    Ne3 Bc6 21. Rd6 Ng7 22. Rf6 {Diagram [#] Materially, Black is up a pawn, but
    those dark squares are very weak, and it is hard to imagine how it will get
    the Rs into play.} Qb7 23. Bh6 Nd5 24. Nxd5 Bxd5 25. Rd1 Ne6 26. Bxf8 Rxf8 27.
    Qh4 {threatening Ng5, with mate on h7 and a skewer on Bxd5.} Bc6 28. Qh6 Rae8
    29. Rd6 {I can't remember seeing a game with two R outposts like this.} Bxf3
    30. Bxf3 {Diagram [#]White has a terrific bind. Black's only mobile piece is
    the Q, otherwise the tactics all go White's way (see notes).  What impresses
    me most about the next phase of the game is that White moves all of its pieces
    from their dominating positions, and ends up leaving Black even MORE tied up
    than before!} Qa6 {Going for counterplay with its only active piece.} (30...
    Qc7 {Tries to hold on.} 31. Bd5 Ng7 (31... Nd4 $2 32. Rxg6+ hxg6 33. Rxg6#) 32.
    Qd2 {is similar to the game, but with Black a bit less active;} (32. f4 $2 Nf5
    $2 (32... Re6 {only move.}) 33. Rxf7 Rxf7 (33... Nxh6 34. Rfxd7+ $18) 34. Bxf7+ Kxf7 35.
    Qxh7+ $18) 32... Nf5 $4 {fails to} 33. Rxf5 $18) 31. h4 Qa5 32. Rd1 c4 33. Rd5
    Qe1+ 34. Kg2 c3 35. bxc3 Qxc3 36. h5 Re7 37. Bd1 {Diagram [#]} Qe1 (37... Ng7
    38. hxg6 hxg6 39. Bb3 Rxe5 (39... Nf5 40. Rxf5 gxf5 41. Qg5+ $18) (39... Re6
    40. Rf3 Qc6 41. Qd2 $18) 40. Rxd7 Re7 41. Rf4 $1 $18 Rxd7 (41... Qc6+ 42. Kh2
    $1) 42. Rh4 Nh5 43. Qxg6+ Qg7 44. Qxh5 Rd6 45. Rg4 Rg6 46. Rxg6 $18) 38. Bb3
    Rd8 39. Rf3 Qe4 40. Qd2 Qg4 41. Bd1 Qe4 (41... Qxh5 42. Rxf7 $18 {the Q can't
    safely defend itself and the Re7.}) 42. h6 Nc7 43. Rd6 Ne6 (43... Qxe5 $4 44.
    Re3 Qg5 45. f4 $18) 44. Bb3 Qxe5 45. Rd5 Qh8 46. Qb4 Nc5 {Diagram [#]} 47. Rxc5
    $3 {SF8 and Komodo10 do not rank this move among their top 4; Houdini4 does,
    but all three rate the resulting position as equal.} bxc5 48. Qh4 $1 {I wonder
    if it saw that the c5 pawn would leave the B with a nice outpost on c4!?} (48.
    Qxc5 d6 49. Bxf7+ Rxf7 50. Qd5 Rdf8 51. Rxf7 Rxf7 52. Qa8+ Rf8 53. Qd5+ $11 {
    with a perpetual.}) 48... Rde8 {only move.} (48... Ree8 49. Bxf7+ Kf8 50. Bc4+ $18) 49.
    Rf6 $1 {Diagram [#]Another picture of complete domination.} Rf8 50. Qf4 a5 51.
    g4 d5 52. Bxd5 Rd7 53. Bc4 a4 {Computers always choose to lose ugly.} (53...
    Rd4 $1 54. Rxf7 Rxf4 55. Rg7# {if SF8 had allowed this, would we suspect it
    had a sense of beauty?}) 54. g5 a3 {If White started marching his K around the
    board right now, then we would know that real AI had arrived, because it would
    show AZ had developed a sense of humour. Or sadism.} 55. Qf3 Rc7 56. Qxa3 Qxf6
    57. gxf6 Rfc8 58. Qd3 Rf8 59. Qd6 Rfc8 60. a4 1-0
    
    [Event "AlphaZero vs. Stockfish"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2017.12.04"]
    [Round "1.4"]
    [White "AlphaZero"]
    [Black "Stockfish 8"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "C11"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "189"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    [Source "CFC Newsfeed"]
    [SourceDate "2017.12.08"]
    [WhiteTeam "England"]
    [BlackTeam "Norway"]
    [WhiteTeamCountry "ENG"]
    [BlackTeamCountry "NOR"]
    
    {BAD OPENING?  This is the only game of the 10 published where SF8 clearly
    plays worse than it would have with an ordinary opening book.} 1. d4 e6 2. Nc3
    Nf6 3. e4 d5 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. Nf3 Nc6 ({Game 9 continued:} 6... cxd4 7.
    Nb5 Bb4+ 8. Bd2 Bc5 9. b4 Be7 10. Nbxd4 Nc6 11. c3 a5 12. b5 $14 {1-0 (52)
    AlphaZero-Stockfish 8 AlphaZero vs. Stockfish 2017}) 7. Be3 Be7 8. Qd2 a6 9.
    Bd3 {Diagram [#]} c4 $2 {Computers generally like these space-gaining
    tempo-gaining moves, but humans who play the French believe that (unless White
    has caslted long!) it is wrong to give up the pressure on d4 and potential
    c-file play since then White's space advantage on the kingside is more
    important than Black's on the queenside.  .  It would be interesting to know
    what AZ played as Black if they had this position, but such a game (if played)
    was not included in the 10 games selected by the google team.    FWIW, during
    the 2016 TCEC SuperFinal between SF8 and Houdini 5, the Opening Book did not
    allow the engines to play this error, continuing: 7...cxd4 8.Nxd4 Bc5  9.Qd2
    0-0 10.0-0-0 a6 to reach a tabiya of the Classical/Steinitz French.} (9... b5
    10. O-O Qb6 11. dxc5 Bxc5 12. Bxc5 Nxc5 13. Qf2 Nd7 14. a3 Ke7 15. Qxb6 Nxb6
    16. Ne2 Bd7 17. b3 f6 18. Ned4 Nxd4 19. Nxd4 fxe5 20. fxe5 $14 {1-0 (50)
    Caruana,F (2787)-Nakamura,H (2793) Saint Louis 2015}) 10. Be2 b5 11. a3 Rb8 12.
    O-O O-O 13. f5 a5 14. fxe6 fxe6 {Diagram [#]} 15. Bd1 $1 {The star move of the
    game: undeveloping to reroute the Nc3 to the kingside.} b4 {Giving up a pawn
    for play that doesn't compensate.} 16. axb4 axb4 17. Ne2 c3 18. bxc3 Nb6 19.
    Qe1 Nc4 20. Bc1 bxc3 21. Qxc3 Qb6 22. Kh1 Nb2 23. Nf4 Nxd1 24. Rxd1 Bd7 25. h4
    Ra8 26. Bd2 Rfb8 27. h5 Rxa1 28. Rxa1 Qb2 29. Qxb2 Rxb2 30. c3 {Diagram [#]}
    Rb3 31. Ra8+ Rb8 32. Ra2 Rb3 33. g4 Ra3 34. Rb2 Kf7 35. Kg2 Bc8 36. Rb6 Ra6 37.
    Rb1 Ke8 38. Kg3 h6 39. Ng6 Ra3 40. Rb6 Bd7 41. g5 hxg5 42. Kg4 Bd8 43. Rb2 Bc8
    44. Nxg5 Ra1 45. Nf3 Ra3 46. Be1 Ba5 {Diagram [#]} 47. Rf2 $1 {offers to sac
    two pawns to make the h-pawn an unstoppable passer.} Ra1 (47... Bxc3 48. Bxc3
    Rxc3 49. Nfh4 Nxd4 50. Rf8+ Kd7 51. Rf7+ Kc6 52. Rxg7 $18) 48. Bd2 Bd8 49. Rh2
    Ne7 50. Bg5 Nf5 51. Bxd8 Kxd8 52. Rb2 Rc1 53. Ngh4 {Diagram [#]} Nxh4 (53...
    Rxc3 54. Nxf5 exf5+ 55. Kf4 Rc1 56. Rg2 Rc7 57. Rg6 $18 {and White's pieces
    dominate Blacks', again.}) 54. Nxh4 Bd7 55. Rb8+ Bc8 56. Ng2 Rxc3 57. Nf4 Rc1
    58. Ra8 Kd7 59. Kf3 Rc3+ 60. Kf2 Ke7 61. Kg2 Kf7 62. Ng6 Ke8 63. Ra1 Rc7 (63...
    Rd3 64. Rf1 Rxd4 65. Rf8+ Kd7 66. Rf7+ $18 {is like the note at move 47, minus
    one pair of Ns.}) 64. Kh3 Rf7 65. Kg4 Kd8 66. Nf4 Bd7 67. Ra7 Kc8 68. Kg3 Re7
    69. Nd3 Kb8 70. Ra6 Bc8 71. Rb6+ Kc7 72. Rd6 Kb8 73. Nc5 g6 74. h6 Rh7 75. Nxe6
    Rxh6 {Diagram [#]} 76. Nf4 Rh1 77. Nxd5 Rh3+ 78. Kf4 Rh4+ 79. Ke3 Rh3+ 80. Kd2
    Bf5 81. Ne7 Rh2+ 82. Ke3 Bh3 83. Nxg6 Rh1 84. Nf4 Bg4 85. Rf6 Kc7 86. Nd3 Bd7
    87. d5 Bb5 88. Nf4 Ba4 89. Kd4 Be8 90. Rf8 Rd1+ 91. Kc5 Rc1+ 92. Kb4 Rb1+ 93.
    Kc3 Bb5 94. Kd4 Ba6 95. Rf7+ 1-0
    
    [Event "AlphaZero vs. Stockfish"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2017.12.04"]
    [Round "1.5"]
    [White "AlphaZero"]
    [Black "Stockfish 8"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "E17"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "233"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    [Source "CFC Newsfeed"]
    [SourceDate "2017.12.08"]
    [WhiteTeam "England"]
    [BlackTeam "Norway"]
    [WhiteTeamCountry "ENG"]
    [BlackTeamCountry "NOR"]
    
    {Bg5!! vs QUEENSIDE  A spectacular move lets AZ finish development and
    establish a game-winning bind.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Bb7 5. Bg2
    Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. d5 exd5 8. Nh4 c6 9. cxd5 Nxd5 10. Nf5 Nc7 11. e4 Bf6 (11...
    d5 12. Re1 Bf6 13. Nc3 Bc8 14. Qf3 Re8 15. Bd2 Nd7 16. exd5 Ne5 17. Qh5 g6 18.
    Nh6+ Kg7 19. Qd1 cxd5 {unclear.} {(0-1, 75) Moiseenko,A (2657)-Anton Guijarro,D (2650)
    Doha, 2016.}) 12. Nd6 Ba6 13. Re1 Ne8 14. e5 Nxd6 15. exf6 (15. exd6 Bc4 16.
    Nd2 Be6 17. Ne4 Na6 18. Qf3 Nb4 19. Nxf6+ {1/2-1/2 (19) Castaneda,G (2518)
    -Admiraal,M (2301) Wijk aan Zee 2012}) 15... Qxf6 16. Nc3 Nb7 $146 (16... Bc4
    17. Bf4 Nf5 18. Ne4 Qg6 19. h4 h6 20. h5 $16 {1/2-1/2 (40) Podzielny,K (2408)
    -Emunds,H (2179) Germany 2011}) 17. Ne4 Qg6 18. h4 h6 19. h5 Qh7 20. Qg4 Kh8 {
    Diagram [#]} 21. Bg5 $3 {Developing a piece and threatening Nf6! The tactics
    are simple enough that even a laptop-powered SF8 can see that the Bg5 can't be
    taken, but it rates the position after ...f5 as 0.00.} f5 $1 (21... hxg5 $4 22.
    Nxg5 Qh6 23. Nxf7+ Rxf7 24. Re8+ Kh7 25. Be4+ {is mating.}) (21... d5 {lets
    White demonstrate one point of Bg5} 22. Nf6 $3 Qc2 (22... Qd3 {covers more
    squares, but makes no difference since it can be dislodged with Rad1.}) 23.
    Bxh6 gxh6 24. Qf4 Kg7 25. Qe5 $18 (25. Ne8+ $18)) 22. Qf4 $1 Nc5 (22... hxg5
    23. Nxg5 Qg8 (23... Qxh5 $2 24. g4 $1 $18 Qg6 (24... Qxg4 $4 25. Qh2+ $18) 25.
    gxf5 Rxf5 26. Qxf5 $18) 24. Re7 {threatening h5-h6.} Rf6 25. Qe5 d6 26. Qc3 Nc5
    27. h6 Rxh6 28. Nf7+ Kh7 29. Nxh6 Kxh6 30. Qd2+ $18) 23. Be7 (23. Nxc5 hxg5 24.
    Qd6 $14) 23... Nd3 24. Qd6 Nxe1 25. Rxe1 fxe4 {Diagram [#]} 26. Bxe4 (26. Bxf8
    Bd3 27. Bxe4 Bxe4 28. Bxg7+ Kxg7 29. Qe5+ $1 Kg8 (29... Kf8 30. Rxe4 Na6 31.
    Qf6+ $18) 30. Qe8+ Kg7 31. Rxe4 $18) 26... Rf5 {only move.} 27. Bh4 Bc4 28. g4 Rd5 29.
    Bxd5 Bxd5 30. Re8+ Bg8 $18 {Diagram [#]Black is up a piece and a pawn, but is
    so completely dominated by White that it can't develop the queenside without
    losing material.} 31. Bg3 c5 32. Qd5 d6 33. Qxa8 Nd7 34. Qe4 Nf6 (34... Qxe4
    35. Rxe4 Nf6 36. Ra4 a5 37. Bxd6 $18) 35. Qxh7+ Kxh7 36. Re7 Nxg4 37. Rxa7 Nf6
    38. Bxd6 Be6 39. Be5 Nd7 {Diagram [#]} 40. Bc3 {The Stockfish build I use
    rates White's next few moves as mistakes, but not nearly serious enough to
    jeopardize White's win.} (40. Bc7 $18) 40... g6 41. Bd2 gxh5 42. a3 Kg6 43. Bf4
    Kf5 44. Bc7 h4 45. Ra8 h5 46. Rh8 Kg6 47. Rd8 Kf7 48. f3 Bf5 49. Bh2 h3 50. Rh8
    Kg6 51. Re8 Kf7 52. Re1 Be6 53. Bc7 b5 54. Kh2 Kf6 55. Re3 Ke7 56. Re4 Kf7 57.
    Bd6 Kf6 58. Kg3 Kf7 59. Kf2 Bf5 60. Re1 Kg6 61. Kg1 c4 62. Kh2 {Diagram [#]} h4
    (62... Kf7) 63. Be7 Nb6 64. Bxh4 Na4 65. Re2 Nc5 66. Re5 Nb3 67. Rd5 Be6 68.
    Rd6 Kf5 69. Be1 Ke5 70. Rb6 Bd7 71. Kg3 Nc1 72. Rh6 Kd5 73. Bc3 {Diagram [#]}
    Bf5 (73... Ne2+ 74. Kf2 Nxc3 75. bxc3 {and White advances the f-pawn.}) 74. Rh5
    Ke6 75. Kf2 Nd3+ 76. Kg1 Nf4 77. Rh6+ Ke7 78. Kh2 Nd5 79. Kg3 Be6 80. Rh5 Ke8
    81. Re5 Kf7 82. Bd2 Ne7 83. Bb4 Nd5 84. Bc3 Ke7 85. Bd2 Kf6 86. f4 Ne7 87. Rxb5
    Nf5+ 88. Kh2 Ke7 89. Ra5 Nh4 90. Bb4+ Kf7 91. Rh5 Nf3+ 92. Kg3 Kg6 93. Rh8 Nd4
    94. Bc3 Nf5+ 95. Kxh3 Bd7 96. Kh2 Kf7 97. Rb8 Ke6 98. Kg1 Bc6 99. Rb6 Kd5 100.
    Kf2 Bd7 101. Ke1 Ke4 102. Bd2 Kd5 103. Rf6 Nd6 104. Rh6 Nf5 105. Rh8 Ke4 106.
    Rh7 Bc8 107. Rc7 Ba6 108. Rc6 Bb5 {Diagram [#]} 109. Rc5 Bd7 (109... Ba6 110.
    Re5+ {wins the N.}) 110. Rxc4+ Kd5 111. Rc7 Kd6 112. Rc3 Ke6 113. Rc5 Nd4 114.
    Be3 Nf5 115. Bf2 Nd6 116. Rc3 Ne4 117. Rd3 1-0
    
    [Event "AlphaZero vs. Stockfish"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2017.12.04"]
    [Round "1.6"]
    [White "AlphaZero"]
    [Black "Stockfish 8"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "E17"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "139"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    [Source "CFC Newsfeed"]
    [SourceDate "2017.12.08"]
    [WhiteTeam "England"]
    [BlackTeam "Norway"]
    [WhiteTeamCountry "ENG"]
    [BlackTeamCountry "NOR"]
    
    {BISHOP PAIR, worth 2 pawns!?} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 b6 4. g3 Be7 5. Bg2
    Bb7 6. O-O O-O 7. d5 exd5 8. Nh4 c6 9. cxd5 Nxd5 10. Nf5 Nc7 11. e4 Bf6 12. Nd6
    Ba6 13. Re1 Ne8 14. e5 Nxd6 15. exf6 Qxf6 16. Nc3 Bc4 17. h4 h6 18. b3 Qxc3 19.
    Bf4 Nb7 20. bxc4 Qf6 ({I wonder if SF8 avoided} 20... Qxc4 {because it allows
    White to draw with} 21. Rc1 Qxa2 22. Ra1 Qc4 23. Rc1) 21. Be4 Na6 22. Be5 Qe6
    23. Bd3 {Diagram [#]} f6 $1 {Black doesn't want to loosen the kingside light
    sqaures, but there's no other way to save the Q from Bxg7. For instance,} (
    23... Qh3 24. Bxg7 $3 (24. Qh5 {also works.}) 24... Kxg7 25. Qh5 {and there's
    no good way to save the Q from getting trapped by Bf5 since} f5 26. Re7+ Kf6
    27. Rae1 {is a mating attack.}) 24. Bd4 Qf7 25. Qg4 {Diagram [#]White is down
    two pawns but has the B pair, light square weaknesses around Black's K, and
    Black's Ns can't both get into the game via c5.} Rfd8 26. Re3 Nac5 27. Bg6 Qf8
    28. Rd1 Rab8 ({I don't see what's wrong with this:} 28... Ne6 $5 29. Bc3 Nbc5)
    29. Kg2 $5 (29. Rf3) 29... Ne6 30. Bc3 Nbc5 31. Rde1 Na4 32. Bd2 Kh8 33. f4 Qd6
    34. Bc1 {Diagram [#]} Nd4 (34... Nf8 $2 35. f5 $18 {followed by Re7 and Bxh6.})
    (34... Nac5 35. f5 Qd4 36. Qe2 {wins a piece by threatening to trap the Q with
    Rd1.}) 35. Re7 f5 36. Bxf5 Nxf5 37. Qxf5 Rf8 38. Rxd7 Rxf5 39. Rxd6 Rf7 $16 {
    Diagram [#] Black has avoided mate, and material is equal, but White has the
    more active Rs the better minor piece, and chances attack by advancing its
    kingside majority.} 40. g4 Kg8 41. g5 hxg5 42. hxg5 Nc5 43. Kf3 Nb7 44. Rdd1
    Na5 45. Re4 c5 46. Bb2 Nc6 47. g6 Rc7 48. Kg4 Nd4 {Diagram [#]AZ is winning,
    but plays some very strange "nothing" moves along the way.} 49. Rd2 $5 {
    Can anyone see a reason not to take on d4 right away?} (49. Bxd4 cxd4 (49...
    Rd8 $2 50. Bc3 Rxd1 $2 51. Re8#) 50. Rdxd4 {transposes to the game, but with
    the R on b8 instead of f8; does that make a difference? I guess it did to AZ.})
    49... Rf8 50. Bxd4 cxd4 51. Rdxd4 Rfc8 52. Kg5 Rf8 (52... Rc5+ {doesn't help.}
    53. Re5 Rxe5+ 54. fxe5 Kf8 55. Rd7 $18 Rxc4 56. Rf7+ $18) 53. Rd2 Rc6 54. Rd5
    Rc7 55. f5 Rb7 56. a3 $5 {playing for zugzwang after ...a6 then a4?} Rc7 57. a4
    a6 58. Red4 Rcc8 59. Re5 Rc7 60. a5 Rc5 61. Rxc5 bxc5 62. Rd6 Ra8 63. Re6 Kf8
    64. Rc6 Ke7 65. Kf4 Kd7 66. Rxc5 Rh8 67. Rd5+ Ke7 68. Re5+ Kd7 69. Re6 Rh4+ 70.
    Kg5 1-0
    
    [Event "AlphaZero vs. Stockfish"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2017.12.04"]
    [Round "1.7"]
    [White "AlphaZero"]
    [Black "Stockfish 8"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "E16"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "199"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    [Source "CFC Newsfeed"]
    [SourceDate "2017.12.08"]
    [WhiteTeam "England"]
    [BlackTeam "Norway"]
    [WhiteTeamCountry "ENG"]
    [BlackTeamCountry "NOR"]
    
    {KARPOV 2.0   A smooth, almost tactics-free win, which reminds me of
    Kramnik's description of Karpov:  "When Karpov had an advantage he could
    maintain the status quo and thereby mysteriously increase his advantage!" 
    Black allows itself to get stuck with an inflexible queenside and a poor LSB,
    and when White starts to advance on the kingside, every pawn move Black makes
    gets expolited by White's pieces.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Bb7 5.
    Bg2 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Bxd2+ 7. Qxd2 d5 8. O-O O-O 9. cxd5 exd5 10. Nc3 Nbd7 {Diagram
    [#]} 11. b4 (11. Rac1 Re8 12. Rfd1 c6 (12... a6 {this game shows the kind of
    bind Black should avoid:} 13. Qc2 Nf8 14. b4 Qe7 15. Qb3 Ne6 16. e3 Rab8 17.
    Ne5 Red8 18. Na4 Ng5 19. Rc2 Nge4 20. Rdc1 Ne8 $16 {1/2-1/2 (55) Beliavsky,A 
    (2679)-Kasimdzhanov,R (2640) Pune 2004}) 13. Qc2 Qe7 14. Nd2 Nf8 15. e4 dxe4
    16. Ndxe4 Ne6 17. Qa4 Nxe4 18. Bxe4 b5 {0-1 (38) Markus,R (2662)-Cori Tello,J 
    (2609) Baku 2016}) 11... c6 12. Qb2 $146 (12. a4 a5 13. b5 c5 14. Rfc1 Re8 15.
    dxc5 bxc5 16. e3 {½-½ Stohl,I (2556)-Parker,J (2570) Kallithea 2002}) 12...
    a5 $6 13. b5 c5 14. Rac1 Qe7 15. Na4 Rab8 16. Rfd1 c4 {Diagram [#]Black has a
    bad piece on b7. The rest of the game looks like Karpov vs NoName GM c.1977.}
    17. Ne5 Qe6 18. f4 Rfd8 19. Qd2 Nf8 20. Nc3 Ng6 21. Rf1 Qd6 22. a4 Rbc8 23. e3
    Ne7 24. g4 Ne8 25. f5 f6 26. Nf3 Qd7 27. Qf2 Nd6 28. Nd2 Rf8 29. Qg3 Rcd8 30.
    Rf4 Nf7 31. Rf2 Rfe8 32. h3 Qd6 33. Nf1 Qa3 34. Rcc2 h5 35. Qc7 Qd6 {Diagram 
    [#]} 36. Qxd6 (36. Qxb7 $5 {looks playable, but not in the Karpov-style like
    the rest of the game.} Rb8 37. Qa6 Ra8 38. Nxd5 $3 Rxa6 (38... Nxd5 39. Qb7 $18
    ) 39. Nxe7+ Qxe7 40. bxa6 Qa7 41. Rxc4 Qxa6 42. Rfc2 {unclear.}) 36... Rxd6 37. Ng3 h4
    {the position is so closed that even though White has to go through
    contortions to win the h-pawn, it can.} (37... hxg4 $5 38. hxg4 Ng5) 38. Nh5
    Ng5 39. Rf1 Kh7 40. Nf4 Rdd8 41. Kh2 Rd7 42. Bh1 $1 {Diagram [#] No sense of
    shame.} Rd6 (42... Rh8 {saves the h4 pawn...} 43. Ng2 Kg8 44. Nf4 $14 {but
    maybe the Rh8 will be offside?}) 43. Ng2 g6 $1 44. Nxh4 gxf5 45. gxf5 Rh8 46.
    Nf3 Kg7 (46... Nxf5 $4 47. Nxg5+ fxg5 48. Rxf5 $18) 47. Nxg5 fxg5 48. Rg2 Kf6 {
    Diagram [#] The next phase feels even more like Karpov: lots of very "small" 
    (one square) moves which infintesimially improve White's coordination and keep
    the extra pawn.} 49. Rg3 Re8 50. Bf3 Rdd8 51. Be2 Rf8 52. Bg4 Nc8 53. Bf3 Rfe8
    {Of course, taking the f5 pawn with the K loses the Bb7.} 54. h4 Rh8 (54...
    Rxe3 $4 {drops the R since after} 55. hxg5+ {the passers will win if Black
    doesn't take one of them, but} Kxf5 56. Bh5+ $18) 55. h5 Rhe8 56. Bg2 Ne7 57.
    h6 Rh8 58. Rh3 Rh7 59. Kg1 Ba8 60. Nd1 g4 61. Rh5 g3 62. Nc3 Ng8 63. Ne2 {
    Diagram [#]The rest is too easy.} Rxh6 64. Nxg3 Rxh5 65. Nxh5+ Kf7 66. Kf2 Nf6
    67. Nxf6 Kxf6 68. Rh1 c3 69. Rc1 Rh8 70. Rxc3 Kxf5 71. Rc7 Kf6 72. Bf3 Rg8 73.
    Rh7 Rg6 74. Bd1 Rg8 75. Rh6+ Ke7 76. Rxb6 Kd7 77. Rf6 Ke7 78. Rh6 Rg7 79. Rh8
    Bb7 80. Rh5 Kd6 81. Rh3 Rf7+ 82. Ke1 Bc8 83. Rh6+ Kc7 84. Rc6+ Kb8 85. Rd6 Bb7
    86. b6 Ba6 87. Rxd5 Rf6 88. Rxa5 Rxb6 89. Kd2 Bb7 90. Rb5 Rf6 91. Bb3 Kc7 92.
    Re5 Ba6 93. Kc3 Rf1 94. Bc2 Rh1 95. a5 Kd6 96. e4 Bf1 97. Rf5 Bg2 98. Rf4 Rc1
    99. Kb2 Rh1 100. a6 1-0
    
    [Event "AlphaZero vs. Stockfish"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2017.12.04"]
    [Round "1.8"]
    [White "AlphaZero"]
    [Black "Stockfish 8"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "E16"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "135"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    [Source "CFC Newsfeed"]
    [SourceDate "2017.12.08"]
    [WhiteTeam "England"]
    [BlackTeam "Norway"]
    [WhiteTeamCountry "ENG"]
    [BlackTeamCountry "NOR"]
    
    {DOES STOCKFISH HATE ITS LSB?  One standard theme in the QGD-family openings
    is the problems Black has in developing the LSB. SF8 lost horribly in several
    games in this match for just this reason.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3
    Bb7 5. Bg2 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Be7 7. Nc3 c6 8. e4 d5 {Diagram [#]} 9. e5 (9. exd5 cxd5
    10. Ne5 O-O 11. O-O Nc6 12. cxd5 (12. Bf4 Na5 13. Rc1 dxc4 14. Bxb7 Nxb7 15.
    Nxc4 {(1-0, 41) Radjabov,T (2724)-Eljanov,P (2739) Geneva, 2017.}) 12... Nxe5
    13. d6 Nc6 $1 14. dxe7 Qxe7 15. Bg5 h6 16. d5 {unclear.} {Anand,V (2792)-Carlsen,M 
    (2863) WCh g5, 2014 ½-½ (39).}) 9... Ne4 10. O-O (10. cxd5 cxd5 11. O-O O-O {
    ½-½ Nikolaidis,I (2524)-Halkias,S (2519) Athens 2001} 12. Re1 Nxd2 13. Qxd2
    Ba6 14. a3 Nc6 15. b4 Bc4 16. Qe3 b5 17. Nd2 Qb6 18. Nxc4 bxc4 19. Rad1 {
    ½-½ (43) Karpov,A (2780)-Tiviakov,S (2625) Linares 1995}) 10... Ba6 11. b3
    Nxc3 12. Bxc3 dxc4 13. b4 b5 {Once again, AZ is down material but its
    opponent's pieces are sadly passive.} 14. Nd2 O-O 15. Ne4 Bb7 16. Qg4 Nd7 17.
    Nc5 Nxc5 18. dxc5 {Diagram [#] Once again, SF8 ends up with a pseudo-B shut in
    on b7. Compare with the Karpov-Tiviakov game in the notes to move 10.} a5 19.
    a3 axb4 20. axb4 Rxa1 21. Rxa1 Qd3 22. Rc1 Ra8 23. h4 Qd8 24. Be4 Qc8 25. Kg2
    $1 Qc7 26. Qh5 g6 (26... h6 $5 {also gives White a hook, though maybe not one
    that allows the R to get into the game so easily.}) 27. Qg4 Bf8 (27... h5 {
    changes the focus but doesn't stop the attack,} 28. Qf4 Bf8 29. g4) 28. h5 Rd8
    29. Qh4 {Diagram [#]} Qe7 (29... Be7 30. Qh3 Bg5 $2 31. hxg6 $1 fxg6 32. f4 Be7
    33. Rh1 Bf8 34. Bxg6 $18) 30. Qf6 {Diagram [#] Calling Black's bluff: without
    the Q to plug some holes there's no way for Black to survive with such passive
    Bs.} Qe8 (30... Qxf6 31. exf6 Bh6 $2 32. Rh1 $1 g5 (32... Bd2 33. Rd1) 33. g4
    e5 34. Ra1 $1 {Black can't allow the R to enter, but can't survive the pure B
    ending with weaknesses on h7, e5, c6.}) 31. Rh1 Rd7 32. hxg6 fxg6 33. Qh4 Qe7
    34. Qg4 Rd8 35. Bb2 Qf7 (35... Rd2 36. Bxg6 hxg6 37. Qxg6+ Bg7 38. Bc1 $18) 36.
    Bc1 c3 37. Be3 Be7 38. Qe2 Bf8 39. Qc2 Bg7 40. Qxc3 {Diagram [#]} Qd7 (40...
    Qc7 41. Bg5 $1) 41. Rc1 $1 {A weird-looking move, but reasonable: White wants
    to play Bg5 to control the d-file, but doesn't want to allow Black time for ...
    Qd4 (then ...Rd7) which would keep control of the d-file, so AZ defends the
    Qc4 first.} Qc7 42. Bg5 Rf8 43. f4 h6 44. Bf6 $1 {A temporary sac which
    ensures the Qs get traded.} Bxf6 45. exf6 Qf7 46. Ra1 Qxf6 47. Qxf6 Rxf6 48.
    Ra7 Rf7 49. Bxg6 $18 {Material is only nominally equal, since the thing on b7
    is useless and White has multiple ways to win.} Rd7 50. Kf2 Kf8 51. g4 Bc8 52.
    Ra8 Rc7 53. Ke3 h5 54. gxh5 Kg7 55. Ra2 Re7 56. Be4 e5 57. Bxc6 exf4+ 58. Kxf4
    Rf7+ 59. Ke5 Rf5+ 60. Kd6 Rxh5 61. Rg2+ Kf6 62. Kc7 Bf5 63. Kb6 Rh4 64. Ka5 $5
    {Another strange-looking but possibly interesting choice: in what way might it
    be better than Kxb5?} Bg4 65. Bxb5 Ke7 66. Rg3 Bc8 67. Re3+ Kf7 68. Be2 1-0
    
    [Event "AlphaZero vs. Stockfish"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2017.12.04"]
    [Round "1.9"]
    [White "AlphaZero"]
    [Black "Stockfish 8"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "C11"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "103"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    [Source "CFC Newsfeed"]
    [SourceDate "2017.12.08"]
    [WhiteTeam "England"]
    [BlackTeam "Norway"]
    [WhiteTeamCountry "ENG"]
    [BlackTeamCountry "NOR"]
    
    {DOES STOCKFISH REALLY HATE ITS LSB?  Another game where SF8 gets a garbage
    LSB. Maybe they could try a match where both engines had no LSBs!?} 1. d4 e6 2.
    e4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. Nf3 cxd4 {Diagram [#]} 7. Nb5 Bb4+ 8.
    Bd2 Bc5 9. b4 Be7 10. Nbxd4 Nc6 11. c3 a5 12. b5 Nxd4 13. cxd4 Nb6 14. a4 Nc4
    15. Bd3 Nxd2 {Diagram [#]} 16. Kxd2 $1 {the obvious move, but still cute.} Bd7
    17. Ke3 b6 18. g4 h5 {Diagram [#]} 19. Qg1 (19. g5 g6 20. Qb1 Bb4 21. Bxg6 (21.
    Nh4 $5) 21... fxg6 22. Qxg6+ Kf8 23. Nh4 {unclear.}) 19... hxg4 20. Qxg4 Bf8 21. h4
    Qe7 22. Rhc1 g6 23. Rc2 Kd8 24. Rac1 Qe8 (24... Rc8 25. Qg2 $16 {and the White
    Q heads to the c-file.}) 25. Rc7 Rc8 26. Rxc8+ Bxc8 27. Rc6 Bb7 28. Rc2 (28.
    Rxb6 $4 Kc7 29. Rd6 Bxd6 30. exd6+ Kxd6 $15) 28... Kd7 29. Ng5 Be7 {Diagram [#]
    Once again, SF8 has a terrible LSB. Since it can (at best) hope to sacrifice
    itself on b5, White's next move maybe shouldn't be thought of as a piece
    sacrifice, since White's up a piece already...} 30. Bxg6 $1 Bxg5 {only move.} (30... fxg6
    $4 31. Qxe6+ Kd8 32. Qxb6+ Kd7 33. Qc7#) (30... Rg8 $2 31. Nxe6 $1 Rxg6 (31...
    fxe6 32. Bxe8+ {with check, saving the Qg4.}) 32. Rc7#) 31. Qxg5 fxg6 32. f5 $3
    Rg8 (32... exf5 $2 33. Qf6 {creeping in along the 6th} Qf8 34. Qxb6 $18) (32...
    gxf5 $2 33. Qg7+ $18 {wins everything.}) 33. Qh6 Qf7 {Diagram [#]} 34. f6 {
    Materially, Black is up a B for a pawn, but that's only if you count that
    immobile thing on b7 as "a piece".} (34. fxe6+ Kxe6 (34... Qxe6 $4 35. Qh7+ $18
    ) 35. Rf2 Qe7 36. Rf6+ {unclear.}) 34... Kd8 (34... Rc8 35. Rxc8 Bxc8 36. Kf4 $1 Ke8
    37. Kg5 $18) 35. Kd2 (35. Rg2 Qc7) 35... Kd7 (35... Qf8 36. Qh7 $18) 36. Rc1
    Kd8 {Diagram [#]} 37. Qe3 $1 ({With play only on the kingside White can win a
    pawn, but can't break through for a win:} 37. Rg1 Bc8 38. h5 g5 {only move.} (38... gxh5
    $2 39. Rxg8+ Qxg8 40. Qg7 $18) 39. Rxg5 Rxg5 40. Qxg5 Ke8 41. h6 Qh7 $11 42.
    Qg7 $4 Qxg7 43. fxg7 Kf7 44. Ke3 Bd7 45. Kf4 Bxb5 $1 $19 {and it turns out
    that the LSB is good for something after all.}) 37... Qf8 {Home laptops find
    the rest of the moves:} 38. Qc3 Qb4 39. Qxb4 axb4 40. Rg1 b3 41. Kc3 Bc8 42.
    Kxb3 Bd7 43. Kb4 Be8 {Diagram [#]} 44. Ra1 $1 {Creating an entry point for the
    R...} Kc7 45. a5 Bd7 46. axb6+ Kxb6 47. Ra6+ Kb7 48. Kc5 {... and the K.} Rd8
    49. Ra2 Rc8+ 50. Kd6 Be8 51. Ke7 g5 52. hxg5 1-0
    
    [Event "AlphaZero vs. Stockfish"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2017.12.04"]
    [Round "1.10"]
    [White "AlphaZero"]
    [Black "Stockfish 8"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "E17"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "111"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    [Source "CFC Newsfeed"]
    [SourceDate "2017.12.08"]
    [WhiteTeam "England"]
    [BlackTeam "Norway"]
    [WhiteTeamCountry "ENG"]
    [BlackTeamCountry "NOR"]
    
    {Topalov prep + Tal Vision.  This game features a mind-boggling sac on move 19,
    followed by an amazing use of the whole board to threaten the Black K while
    preventing Black from finishing queenside development.} 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. d4 e6 3.
    c4 b6 4. g3 Bb7 5. Bg2 Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. d5 exd5 8. Nh4 c6 9. cxd5 Nxd5 10. Nf5
    Nc7 11. e4 d5 {Diagram [#]} 12. exd5 (12. Re1 Bf6 13. Nc3 Bc8 14. Qf3 Re8 15.
    Bd2 Nd7 16. exd5 Ne5 17. Qh5 g6 18. Nh6+ Kg7 19. Qd1 cxd5 {Moiseenko,A (2657)
    -Anton Guijarro,D (2650) Doha 2016 0-1 (75)}) (12. Nc3 Bf6 13. exd5 Nxd5 14.
    Nxd5 cxd5 15. Bf4 (15. Ne3 Na6 16. Nxd5 Nc5 {1/2-1/2 (16) Bobras,P (2565)
    -Macieja,B (2600) Germany 2008}) 15... Bxb2 16. Rb1 Bf6 17. Re1 Na6 18. Bd6 (
    18. Nd6 Bc6 19. Bxd5 Bxd5 20. Qxd5 Qd7 $15) 18... Re8 19. Qg4 g6 20. Nh6+ Kg7
    21. Nf5+ Kg8 22. Nh6+ Kg7 23. Nf5+ $11 {1/2-1/2 (23) Ragger,M (2700)-Vitiugov,
    N (2721) Germany 2017}) 12... Nxd5 13. Nc3 Nxc3 14. Qg4 $146 g6 15. Nh6+ Kg7
    16. bxc3 Bc8 17. Qf4 Qd6 18. Qa4 g5 {Diagram [#]} 19. Re1 $5 {Mind-boggling!!
    Another amazing sac for development/domination.  It's worth noting that even
    at low ply, SF8 and the other top engines all rate White as having almost full
    compensation for the piece.} Kxh6 20. h4 f6 21. Be3 Bf5 22. Rad1 Qa3 23. Qc4 {
    White is down a piece and a pawn, but Black's Ra8 and Nb8 are missing in
    action.} b5 (23... Na6 24. Be4 Bxe4 25. Qxe4 Rae8 26. hxg5+ fxg5 27. Kg2 $1 $18
    {and Black is getting mated.}) 24. hxg5+ fxg5 25. Qh4+ Kg6 26. Qh1 {Diagram [#]
    } Kg7 27. Be4 Bg6 28. Bxg6 hxg6 29. Qh3 Bf6 {only move.} (29... a6 $2 {just to
    illustrate:} 30. Bd4+ Bf6 31. Bxf6+ Rxf6 32. Rd8 $18) 30. Kg2 Qxa2 31. Rh1 Qg8
    {only move.} {Diagram [#]} 32. c4 $5 {There are a few Tal games where he shows this kind
    of board vision, but I'm not Tal and even with computer assisstance I can't
    get my head around this position. I think the point of c4 is to stop ...Qa2+
    after f2-f4... or deny it the use of c4 in some line.} (32. f4 g4 33. Qxg4 Bxc3
    {unclear.} 34. Rd6 Rf6 35. Qh4 {unclear.}) 32... Re8 {Black can't move the N without
    allowing a killing Rd7+, and can't get the Ra8 into play with Ra7 (which would
    be taken by the Be3).  White doesn't have any immediate threats, so Black has
    a lot of options. The notes cover a few, starting with the crudest, which
    illustrate some of the tactics:} (32... Na6 $4 33. Rd7+ Rf7 34. Qh6#) (32... c5
    33. Bxc5 Nc6 34. Rd7+ Ne7 35. Bxe7 Bxe7 36. Rxe7+ Rf7 37. Qe6 $1 Rd8 (37...
    Raf8 38. Qe5#) 38. Rxf7+ Qxf7 39. Rh7+ $18) (32... a5 33. Rd6 a4 (33... bxc4
    34. Qg4 Rf7 $2 35. Bd4 $18 {and there's no good defence to Qxg5.}) 34. Qh6+ Kf7
    35. Rxf6+ Kxf6 36. Qxg5+ Ke6 37. Bc5 $18 Kd7 38. Bxf8 $1 {(was this the point
    of c3-c4? if the pawn was back on c4 then ...Qd5+ would win for Black.)} Qxf8
    39. Rh7+ $18) (32... bxc4 $2 33. f4 $1 $18 g4 (33... a5 34. fxg5 Be5 35. Bc5
    $18) 34. Qxg4 Rf7 35. f5 $1 $18) 33. Bd4 (33. Qh6+ Kf7 34. Bxg5 Qg7 35. Qh4 {only move.}
    Re5 36. Bxf6 Qxf6 37. Qh7+ Qg7 38. Qh4 {threatening Rd8, and may be just a
    draw after ...Qf6.}) 33... Bxd4 34. Rxd4 Rd8 (34... bxc4 35. g4 $3 $18 {
    threatening Qc3.}) 35. Rxd8 Qxd8 36. Qe6 {Diagram [#]} Nd7 {Black finally
    finishes developing the queenside, but at the cost of an exchange:} 37. Rd1 Nc5
    38. Rxd8 Nxe6 39. Rxa8 Kf6 40. cxb5 cxb5 41. Kf3 Nd4+ 42. Ke4 Nc6 43. Rc8 Ne7
    44. Rb8 Nf5 45. g4 Nh6 46. f3 Nf7 47. Ra8 Nd6+ 48. Kd5 Nc4 49. Rxa7 Ne3+ 50.
    Ke4 Nc4 51. Ra6+ Kg7 52. Rc6 Kf7 53. Rc5 Ke6 54. Rxg5 Kf6 55. Rc5 g5 56. Kd4
    1-0
    
    merida
    46

    ..

    Author: John Upper
    Posted: December 9, 2017, 6:52 am

    November 27, 2017 marked the 125th anniversary of the birth of Fedor Bohatirchuk, the Ukrainian-born Canadian chess master.

    Bohatirchuk is probably best known for his excellent score against Botvinnik: +3 =1 -0. The second of those three wins was our previous Canadian Game of the Week: here.

    While he never won the Canadian Closed Chess Championship -- he emigrated to Canada at the age of 56 and taught radiology at the University of Ottawa -- he did defeat players who did. The diagrams show positions from games between Fedor Bohatirchuk and four Canadian Chess Champions, including the two who won it the most:

    Maurice Fox (1898-1988)
    Eight-time Canadian Chess Champion between 1927-49. Defeated Capablanca and drew with Alekhine in simuls, and defeated 13-year-old Bobby Fischer at the 1956 Canadian Open in Montreal. 

    Abe Yanofsky (1925-2000)
    Eight-time Canadian Champion between 1943-65, the first Grandmaster in the (British) Commonwealth, and the record-holder among Canadian men with 141 Olympiad games played.

    Frank Anderson (1928-1980)
    Two-time Canadian Chess Champion (1953, =1st with Yanofsky; 1955 clear first). The first Canadian-born International Master.

    Lawrence Day (1949- )
    Won the Canadian Championship in 1991, as well as the Canadian Open and Quebec Open three times each. Lawrence studied with Bohatirchuk while a student in Ottawa, and his influence may be seen in Day's use of g3 systems against the Sicilian.

    The coloured circle in the bottom left of each board shows the player to move. 

    Solutions and analysis below:

    ..

    () - ()
     
     Round:  Result:
    [Event "CAN-ch"]
    [Site "Vancouver CAN"]
    [Date "1951.??.??"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "Bohatirchuk, Fedor"]
    [Black "Yanofsky, Abe"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "C00"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [SetUp "1"]
    [FEN "5brr/2qnn3/p1b1k1pp/2p1Pp2/2Pp1P1P/3P1N1Q/P2BBN1K/1R4R1 w - - 0 32"]
    [PlyCount "19"]
    [EventDate "1951.08.24"]
    [EventType "tourn"]
    [EventRounds "12"]
    [EventCountry "CAN"]
    
    32. Ne4 $1 $18 {Threatening mate with Ng5.} Bxe4 (32... Kf7 33. Nd6+ Ke6 34. h5
    gxh5 35. Qxh5 {threat Qf7#.} Rh7 36. Rxg8 Nxg8 37. Qxf5+ $18) 33. dxe4 Kf7 34.
    Bd3 Qc6 35. Rbe1 {White just keeps piling on the central pressure.} (35. exf5
    $18 {also wins.}) 35... Ke8 36. h5 fxe4 37. Bxe4 Qa4 38. hxg6 Bg7 39. Qe6 Rf8
    40. f5 Qxa2 41. Bc6 1-0
    
    
    [Event "CAN-ch"]
    [Site "Vancouver CAN"]
    [Date "1951.08.30"]
    [Round "12"]
    [White "Bohatirchuk, Fedor"]
    [Black "Anderson, Frank"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "A03"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [SetUp "1"]
    [FEN "1rq2bk1/7p/p1r1p3/BpPp1pp1/P2PnP2/3QP3/1RB3PP/2R3K1 w - - 0 28"]
    [PlyCount "27"]
    [EventDate "1951.08.24"]
    [EventType "tourn"]
    [EventRounds "12"]
    [EventCountry "CAN"]
    
    28. Rcb1 $2 (28. axb5 axb5 29. Rxb5 $2 (29. fxg5) 29... Nxc5 $1 30. dxc5 Rxb5
    31. Qxb5 Rxc5 $11 {Black gets the piece back.}) (28. g3 gxf4 29. exf4 $14) (28.
    fxg5 $1 e5 $5 (28... Be7 $5) (28... Nxg5 29. axb5 axb5 30. Rxb5 $18) 29. Bb3 $1
    $18) 28... gxf4 29. exf4 $2 Bh6 $2 {Black misses his only chance.} (29... Rxc5
    $3 $19 {and only move. The main point is that taking the R leads to a
    smothered mate:} 30. dxc5 (30. g3 Rc4 31. axb5 Bg7 $19) 30... Qxc5+ 31. Kh1
    Nf2+ $19 32. Kg1 Nh3+ 33. Kh1 Qg1+ 34. Rxg1 Nf2#) 30. g3 {Defends f4 and gives
    the K some air, so there's no smothered mate tactic any more.} Bg7 31. axb5
    Rxc5 {Too late.} 32. dxc5 (32. bxa6 Rxb2 33. Rxb2 Rxa5 $19) 32... Qxc5+ 33. Kg2 {Only move.} Qf2+
    34. Kh3 $19 (34. Kh1 $4 Bxb2 35. Rxb2 axb5 {with counterplay by ...Ra8.}) 34... Bxb2 35. Rxb2
    Qg1 36. Ba4 $1 Rf8 37. Bc3 Nf2+ 38. Rxf2 {Only move.} Qxf2 39. bxa6 Ra8 40. Bb5 Kf7 41.
    Qd4 1-0
    
    
    [Event "CAN-ch"]
    [Site "Ottawa CAN"]
    [Date "1955.08.26"]
    [Round "11"]
    [White "Fox, Maurice"]
    [Black "Bohatirchuk, Fedor"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "C73"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [SetUp "1"]
    [FEN "r3qrk1/2pbb1pp/p1p2pn1/2Ppp3/Q2PP3/2N2N2/PP3PPP/2BR1RK1 b - - 0 14"]
    [PlyCount "9"]
    [EventDate "1955.08.16"]
    [EventType "tourn"]
    [EventRounds "11"]
    [EventCountry "CAN"]
    
    14... Bg4 $1 $17 15. exd5 (15. dxe5 Bxf3 16. gxf3 Nh4 $19) (15. Kh1 dxe4 16.
    Nxe4 f5 17. Nc3 e4 $17 {Is better than the game, but still nearly hopeless.})
    15... Bxf3 16. gxf3 Nh4 {Only move.} $19 17. dxe5 Qg6+ 18. Qg4 Nxf3+ {The Qg4 loses its
    defender and drops next.} 0-1
    
    
    [Event "RA CC - Carleton m"]
    [Site "Ottawa CAN"]
    [Date "1968.??.??"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "Bohatirchuk, Fedor"]
    [Black "Day, Lawrence"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "B43"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [SetUp "1"]
    [FEN "2r2rk1/6pp/5b2/p1n1pN2/3pq1Q1/BP4PP/P1P4K/3R1R2 w - - 0 29"]
    [PlyCount "61"]
    [EventDate "1968.??.??"]
    [EventType "team"]
    [EventCountry "CAN"]
    [SourceTitle "Chess Chat 1968.11"]
    
    29. Nh6+ $1 {Forcing the K to the corner saves the Pc2.} (29. Qxe4 Nxe4 30.
    Bxf8 Rxc2+ 31. Kg1 Kxf8 {unclear}) 29... Kh8 30. Qxe4 Nxe4 31. Bxf8 Rxf8 32. Rde1 Nc3
    33. Ng4 e4 (33... Nxa2 34. Rxe5 $18) 34. Rf5 Rd8 35. Nf2 $1 ({White can't win
    a pawn with} 35. Nxf6 gxf6 36. Rxf6 $4 (36. Rc5 $1 f5 $18) 36... d3 $11) 35...
    e3 36. Nd3 {With the pawns blockaded on dark squares the B is just a defensive
    spectator.} Ra8 (36... Nxa2 37. Rxa5 Nc3 38. Rea1 $18) 37. a4 Kg8 38. Kg2 Kf7 39.
    Rc5 Ke6 40. Rxc3 dxc3 41. Rxe3+ Kd5 42. Kf3 Rf8 43. Ke2 Rd8 44. Kf3 Kc6 45.
    Re6+ Kc7 46. Ke3 h6 47. h4 Rd7 48. Re4 Rd8 49. b4 axb4 50. Rxb4 Kc6 51. Rb5 Rd4
    52. Nb4+ Kd6 53. a5 Rd2 54. a6 Bd4+ 55. Ke4 Bc5 56. Rb7 (56. Nd3 $1 Re2+ 57.
    Kf3 $2 (57. Kf4 $18) 57... Re3+ 58. Kg4 Rxd3 59. cxd3 c2 60. Rxc5 $14 Kxc5 61.
    a7 c1=Q 62. a8=Q $16) 56... Rd1 57. Nd3 Bg1 58. Rxg7 h5 59. Rh7 1-0
    merida
    46

    ..

    Category:

    Author: John Upper
    Posted: December 7, 2017, 3:21 am

    London Chess Fesitval
    December 1-11, 2017.

    London Chess Classic, FIDE Open, the British Knockout Championship, Rapid and Blitz tournaments, simuls, lectures and more.

    9th London Chess Classic

    10-player RR featuring 5 of the world's top six: 

    Rank... Name.... FED.... Rtg

    1  Carlsen Magnus, NOR...2837
    2  Aronian Levon, ARM...2805
    3  Caruana Fabiano, USA...2799
    5  Vachier-Lagrave Maxime, FRA...2789
    6  So Wesley, USA... 2788
    8  Anand Viswanathan, IND... 2782
    9  Nakamura Hikaru, USA... 2781
    13 Karjakin Sergey, RUS... 2760
    27 Nepomniachtchi Ian, RUS.... 2729
    33 Adams Michael, ENG... 2715

    Lev Aronian has had an amazing year so far, with wins at the Grenke Classic in April, Altibox-Norway Chess in June, St.Louis Rapid and Blitz in August, the World Cup in September, and marriage on September 30 to long-time girlfriend, WIM Arianne Caoili, and =1st the the Grand Prix in Palma de Mallorca in November.

    Carlsen has to be the favourite -- the top-seed, convincing winner at the Isle of Man, and two recent crushing wins at the chess.com Speed Championship all show that he's in excellent form -- but Caruana came to London with the same secret weapon that the World Champion had at the Isle of Man... 

    Rounds 1-8 start at various times between 2 and 4pm local (9am and 11am, EST). Round 9 starts at noon local, 5pm EST.

    Live Games

    https://grandchesstour.org/

    Homepage

    http://www.londonchessclassic.com/

     

    London Classic Open
    Dec. 2-9, 2017.

    A 9-round Swiss featuring 37 GMs, 11 over 2600 and 25 over 2500. One game per day, except Sunday, which has 2 rounds.

    Three Canadians are playing: WIM Yuanling Yuan, Daniel Abrahams and IM Aman Hambleton, who is going for his still-elusive final GM Norm. All three were paired down in round 1 and won.Yuanling plays 13-year-old IM Nihail Sarin in round 2.

    Canadian Results

    http://chess-results.com/tnr317477.aspx?lan=1&art=25&fedb=CAN&flag=30&wi=821

    Complete Results

    http://chess-results.com/tnr317477.aspx?lan=1

     

    3rd British Knockout Championship

    The event follows the same format as the FIDE World Cup: semis are best-of-two matches followed (if necessary) by rapid tie-breaks; finals are  best-of-four, followed by Rapid KO. The Semi-Finals see four well-matched British GMs:

    • Nigel Short vs Luke McShane and
    • David Howell vs Matthew Sadler. 

    The event has no clear favourite: Sadler has the highest FIDE rating (2685) but that's only 45 points more than the lowest-rated semi-finalist. Short has by far the most experience -- becoming an IM when the next-oldest player (Sadler) was only 6. 

    Homepage

    http://www.londonchessclassic.com/

    Author: John Upper
    Posted: December 3, 2017, 4:01 pm

    This week -- November 27, 2017 to be precise -- marked the 125th anniversary of the birth of Fedor Bohatirchuk, the Ukrainian-born Canadian Champion. Chessbase marked the occasion with a wonderful article which you can read that article here:

    https://en.chessbase.com/post/the-man-who-was-dr-zhivago-fedor-bohatyrchuk

    It has good photos and some nice game fragments, though I would have liked a bit more evidence to back up Lawrence Day's (plausible) claim that Bohatirchuk was Boris Pasternak's inspiration for Dr.Zhivago.

    Bohatirchuk's greatest claim to chess fame comes from his enviable record against future World Champion Mikhail Botvinnik: +3 =1 -0.  

    Our Canadian Game of the Week is the second of those three wins. Against a Sicilian Dragon, Bohatirchuk sets up a kind of Maroczy Bind, and when Black strikes out with ...f5, White keeps a lid on Black's play and converts his space and structural advantage in the center. If Botvinnik had been a better human being -- admittedly, easier in Canada than in Stalinist Russia -- he might have credited Bohatirchuk with a valuable lesson, rather than threatening to kill him.

    A future post will include a selection of tactics featuring Bohatirchuk against top Canadian Champions.

    photo: Bohatirchuk family headstone in the Pinecrest Cemetary, Ottawa. One hour before sunset, November 27, 2017. 

    ..

    () - ()
     
     Round:  Result:
    [Event "URS-ch08 Final"]
    [Site "Leningrad (Russia)"]
    [Date "1933.09.03"]
    [Round "15"]
    [White "Bohatirchuk, Fedor Parfenovich"]
    [Black "Botvinnik, Mikhail"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "B73"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "115"]
    [EventDate "1933.08.16"]
    [EventType "tourn"]
    [EventRounds "19"]
    [EventCountry "URS"]
    [Source "ChessBase"]
    [SourceDate "1999.07.01"]
    
    1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Be2 g6 7. Be3 Bg7 {
    Diagram [#]} 8. Qd2 {This can transpose to the mainline (with 00 and Nb3) but
    gives Black the option to trade a pair of minors, which Botvinnik does.} (8.
    Nb3 Be6 9. f4 O-O 10. g4 (10. O-O Na5 11. Nxa5 (11. f5 Bc4) 11... Qxa5 12. Bf3
    Bc4 13. Re1 Rfd8 $11 {0-1 (29) Rauzer,V-Botvinnik,M Leningrad (Russia) 1933
    URS-ch}) 10... d5 $5 11. f5 Bc8 12. exd5 Nb4 13. d6 $5 Qxd6 {Botvinnik found
    the following perpetual check after a thought of twenty minutes. - ChessBase}
    14. Bc5 Qf4 $1 15. Rf1 Qxh2 16. Bxb4 Nxg4 17. Bxg4 Qg3+ 18. Rf2 Qg1+ 19. Rf1
    Qg3+ 20. Rf2 Qg1+ {½-½ Alekhine,A-Botvinnik,M Nottingham, 1936.}) (8. O-O O-O
    ) 8... Ng4 9. Bxg4 Bxg4 10. Nd5 $1 {Diagram [#]  White sets up a Maroczy bind 
    (e4 + c4) where he's already traded the LSB, which can be a problem piece,
    blocked by its own pawns. It's worth comparing this to some lines in the Bb5
    anti-Sicilian, where it's the queenside N that gets traded for White's LSB.} ({Today, a more usual continuation would be to press on the kingside. Here's an example: MVL is known as a world-class expert in the Najdorf, but it is a little surprising to see him get a nearly winning position against a Dragon expert like Jones after only 20 moves.} 10. f3 Bd7 11. h4 Ne5 12. b3 Rc8 13. h5 gxh5 14. Rxh5 Qa5 15. Nd5 Qxd2+ 16. Kxd2 e6 17. Nf4 Ng6 18. Nd3 $1 $14 d5 $6 19. e5 $1 $16 {White has a big advantage in this French-style middle game. (1-0, 48) Vachier
    Lagrave,M (2796)-Jones,G (2665) chess.com, 2017.}) 10... O-O ({Here's another
    Bohatirchuk win from the same position a year later. It looks to me like
    Black had learned from Botvinnik's failure to get play with ..
    .f5 in our main game, and so he keeps his kingside flat, generating enough piece play for
    equality on the queenside.} 10... Rc8 11. c4 Qa5 12. Nc3 (12. b4 $5 {looks
    reasonable, gaining a tempo to pursue White's usual plan of queenside
    expansion; but grabbing the extra space leaves White missing his LSB:} Qd8 $1
    13. Rc1 Ne5 14. f3 Bd7 15. Qe2 {and Black goes ...e6 and ...Qc7 to attack c4.})
    12... a6 13. Rc1 O-O 14. b3 Bd7 15. O-O Rfd8 16. Rfd1 {Diagram [#]} Bxd4 $5 {
    Standard when White has an LSB and Black is left with a N which can use the
    dark squares, but here it doesn't result in that kind of play.} 17. Bxd4 Nxd4
    18. Qxd4 Bc6 19. Qe3 e6 (19... b5 $1 {with counterplay}) 20. Rd3 Rd7 21. Rcd1 Rcd8 22. Qg3
    Qc5 23. h3 b5 24. cxb5 axb5 25. Rc1 $2 Bxe4 {If his K was on h2 then White
    would be able to take the B and play Nf6+, but here Black captures on c1 with
    check.} 26. Rdd1 Qf5 $1 (26... Bb7 $2 27. Nd5 $1) 27. Qe3 Ba8 28. Ne2 e5 $1 29.
    Ng3 Qf6 30. Qe2 h5 $5 (30... Rb8 {doesn't concede the pawn.}) 31. Qxb5 h4 32.
    Nf1 Qg5 33. Ne3 d5 34. Rc8 Rxc8 35. Qxd7 Rd8 36. Qg4 (36. Qc7 $1 d4 {
    threatening the N and mate on g2} 37. Ng4 f5 $140 $2 (37... d3 38. f3 $18) 38.
    Nh6+ $1 $18) 36... Qf6 37. Qe2 e4 38. Ng4 Qg7 (38... Qd6 $11) 39. Qa6 Qc3 40.
    Qf6 Rc8 (40... Qxf6 $142 41. Nxf6+ Kf8 42. Nxe4 $14) 41. Nh6+ Kh7 42. Qxh4 Kg7
    43. Ng4 $18 Rc7 44. Kh2 f5 45. Qh6+ Kf7 46. Ne3 Qe5+ 47. Kg1 Bb7 48. h4 Rc8 49.
    h5 gxh5 50. Qh7+ Qg7 51. Qxf5+ Kg8 52. Nxd5 {(1-0, 63) Bohatirchuk,F-Ilyin
    Zhenevsky,A Leningrad (Russia), 1934.}) 11. c4 Bd7 (11... Rc8 12. O-O Nxd4 13.
    Bxd4 Rxc4 {is a not-very-good sac mentioned by John Emms in "Dangerous Weapons:
    The Sicilian".} 14. Bxg7 Kxg7 15. Ne3 Rxe4 16. f3 Bxf3) 12. O-O f5 $5 {Active,
    but leaves Black with hanging pawns on the center files which will requre very
    active play to justify. It might be relevant that Botvinnik was 22 when he
    played this game, while Bohatirchuk, who puts out all the fires, was 41.} 13.
    exf5 Bxf5 14. Nxf5 Rxf5 15. Rad1 Qd7 16. Bh6 $14 {Trading pieces leaves Black
    with more long-term problems defending his central pawns.} Bxh6 17. Qxh6 Raf8
    18. Qd2 Ne5 19. Ne3 Rh5 20. f3 Qe6 21. b3 Qf6 {Diagram [#]} 22. f4 $1 $14 (22.
    Qd5+ Rf7 23. Qxb7 Qf4 $13) (22. Nd5 $1 Qf7 (22... Qh4 23. g3 (23. h3 $4 Nxf3+
    $19) 23... Qh3 24. Nxe7+ $18) 23. Qe3 e6 24. Nc3 $16) 22... Nc6 23. Rde1 Qg7
    24. Nd5 {Diagram [#]} g5 $2 (24... Rhf5 $142 25. g3 (25. b4 e5 $1 {with counterplay}) 25...
    e5) (24... e5 $5 25. fxe5 $14) (24... Qh6 25. g3 Re5 $5 26. Ne3 $16) 25. Qe2 $1
    $16 {Gains a tempo on the Rh5 to completely control the e-file.} (25. Nxe7+ $5
    Nxe7 26. Qe2) (25. Nc7 $1 Qh6) 25... Qh6 $6 (25... Rh6 $142 {may be
    objectively better, but still leads to a terrible R ending:} 26. Nxe7+ Nxe7 27.
    Qxe7 gxf4 28. Qxg7+ Kxg7 29. Re7+ $18) 26. fxg5 $18 {The tempo on the Qh6
    breaks the battery on h2 and kills Black's counterplay.} Rxg5 27. Nxe7+ Kh8 28.
    Rxf8+ Qxf8 29. Nxc6 bxc6 {Diagram [#]White has outplayed the future World
    Champion and is up a pawn, with a safer K and better pawn structure.} 30. Qe7 (
    30. Qe8 {was more ruthless} Qxe8 (30... Rg8 31. Qxc6 $18) 31. Rxe8+ Rg8 (31...
    Kg7 32. Re7+ $18) 32. Rxg8+ Kxg8 33. b4 $18 {and the outside queenside passer
    will win.}) 30... Qxe7 31. Rxe7 Ra5 32. a4 d5 33. cxd5 cxd5 34. Rd7 $18 a6 35.
    Ra7 d4 36. Rd7 Rc5 37. Rxd4 Rc1+ 38. Kf2 Rc2+ 39. Kf1 Rb2 40. Rd8+ Kg7 41. Rb8
    a5 42. Rb5 Kg6 43. h4 $1 $18 h5 44. Kg1 Kh6 45. Kh2 Kg6 46. Kg3 Rb1 47. Kf2 Kh6
    48. Ke3 Rg1 49. Rxa5 Rxg2 50. Rb5 Rg3+ 51. Kf2 Rg4 52. Rb6+ Kg7 53. a5 Rxh4 54.
    a6 Rh2+ 55. Kg3 Ra2 56. b4 h4+ 57. Kxh4 Kf7 58. b5 1-0
    merida
    46

    ..

     

    Author: John Upper
    Posted: December 1, 2017, 6:52 am

    22  24 chess tournaments across Canada this December 2017 and January 2018.
    If you can't quit, you might as well play...  


    December 2, 2017 

    Kelowna Winter Active
    Kelowna Central Library, Kelowna BC.

    4 round Swiss
    TC: G/30

    https://beanscenechess.wordpress.com/2017/11/22/185/

     

    December 2-3 , 2017

    Mississauga Open 2017
    Erindale United Church, Mississauga, ON

    5 Round Swiss
    TC: 90 + 30

    http://www.miltonchess.ca/images/cfc/2017_mississauga_open.pdf 


    December 8-10, 2017

    RA December Open
    RA Centre, Ottawa

    5 Round Swiss
    TC: 90 + 30

    https://www.eoca.ca/

     

    Nanaimo Winter Open
    Coast Bastion Hotel, Nanaimo BC.

    5 Round Swiss
    TC: 90 + 30

    https://nanaimo-open.ca/next_tournament 


     December 9-10 & 16-17, 2017

    Tournoi Étoiles montantes/Quebec Young Stars
    Chess’n Math Association, Montréal

    8-round Swiss, CFC and FIDE rated, generous bye policy.

    http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/activite/tournoi-etoiles-montantes-2e-edition 


     December 15-17, 2017

    Hart House Holidays Open
    Hart House, Toronto

    5 Round Swiss
    TC: 90 + 30

    https://harthousechess.com/2017/11/01/hart-house-holidays-open/

      

    December 16-17, 2017.

    WBX Team Tournament
    Edmonton Chess Club

    3-player Team tournament, Swiss or RR depending on entries

    http://www.albertachess.org/2017WBX.php 


     December 23, 2017 

    Seneca Hill OCC Qualifier
    St.Timothy Catholic School, North York, ON

    Students: K-12
    5 round Swiss
    TC: G/25

    https://senecahillchess.com/2017/11/07/ontario-chess-challenge-is-back-to-seneca-hill/


      December 26-31, 2017

    2017-18 Canadian Women's Zonal/Championnat Zonal Féminin
    St.Henri Community Centre, Montréal

    10 player Round-Robin. 
    Winner represents Canada at the next Women's World Cup

    http://online.flipbuilder.com/hwhh/dskp/mobile/index.html#p=1

     

    Tournoi du Père Noël
    St.Henri Community Centre, Montréal

    5 Round Swisse, une partie par jour
    Cad:30m/75min + 30min/mat + 30s

    http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/activite/tournoi-du-pere-noel-3 


      


     January 2-6, 2018

    2018 Montreal Winter Chess Classic
    Collège Jean-de-Brébeuf, Montréal

    5 Round Swiss
    TC: 90 + 30

    Plus: an 8-player Invitation Only RR for FIDE-rated players over 2150.
    Plus: a chess training camp (9am-5pm) including rapid and blitz tournaments and lessons from FM Lefong Hua.

    http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/activite/classique-hivernale-de-montreal-2018

     

    January 5-7, 2018

    2018 John Schleinich Memorial
    Calgary Chess Club

    6-player RRs by rating group. No Byes!
    TC: 40/90 + G/30 + 30

    http://calgarychess.com/WORDPRESS/?page_id=10675

     

    January 6, 2018 

    NYYCC & GP
    St.Timothy Catholic School, North York, ON

    U8, U10, U12, U14, U16, U18 Open and Girls
    5 round Swiss
    TC: G/25

    https://senecahillchess.com/2017/11/08/2018-nyycc-and-gp/

     

    Woodpusher' Challenge
    Edmonds Community Center,  Burnaby BC.

    4 and 5 round Swisses

    http://www.chess.bc.ca/Events/WP%201801%20Flyer%20v9.pdf

     

    January 6-7, 2018

    Guelph Winter Pro-Am 
    Guelph University Centre, Guelph ON.

    5 Round Swiss
    TC: 90 + 30

    Discount entry before Nov. 30.

    Contact: halbond AT sympatico DOT ca 


     January 12-14, 2018

    Championnat Jeunesse du Québec
    Centre communautaire Saint-Henri, Montréal

    Ouvert pour les joueurs moins de 18 ans, au 1er janvier 2018.

    5 Ronde Swisse
    Cad: 90 + 30

    http://www.fqechecs.qc.ca/activite/championnat-jeunesse-du-quebec-2018

     

    2018 Victoria Open
    Comfort Inn and Suites, Victoria BC

    5 Round open Swiss
    TC: 90 + 30

    plus: Invitational matches between BC and Washington, and between Vancouver and Victoria

    http://victoriachessclub.pbworks.com/w/page/100118877/Victoria%20Ope

     

    January 13-14, 2018

    Canadian University Chess Championship
    University of Ottawa

    5-round, 4-player Team Swiss

    Blitz Tournament Friday night (Jan.12)

    https://uochess.club/ 


     January 16, 2018

    2018 Greater Toronto Chess League
    Willowdale Chess Club, ON

    The 2018 GTCL will be a 4-player, RR Team tournament, held on consecutive Tuesdays.

    TC: 60 + 10

    Contact:  Sasha Starr <alexander DOT starr AT gmail DOT com> 


     January 19-21, 2018

    RA Winter Open
    RA Centre, Ottawa

    5 Round Swiss
    TC: 90 + 30

    https://www.eoca.ca/ 


     January 27-28, 2018

    Ontario Junior Championship
    Erindale United Church, Mississauga, Ontario

    5 Round Swiss
    TC: 90 + 30

    https://elevatemychess.com/ontario-junior/

     

    January 27 & 28, 2018 [tentative]

    PEI Quick and PEI Blitz
    Charlottetown, UPEI

    Quick:
    5 Round Swiss
    TC:G/25 + 5 sec delay

    Blitz:
    6-8 double-round Swiss
    TC: 3 + 2

    http://mcc.cdevastation.com/maritime.html

    Author: John Upper
    Posted: November 25, 2017, 8:56 pm

    Our Canadian Game of the Week is Piasetski - Pashayan, from the 27th World Senior Championship, which just finished in Acqui Terme, Italy.
    Notes by IM Leon Piasetski.


    27th FIDE World Senior Championship
    November 6-19, 2017.
    Acqui Terme, Italy

    The 27th FIDE World Championship ended this week in the Northern Italian resort town of Acqui Terme. 

    The World Senior Championship has four sections: Men's and Women's in both 50+ and 65+ age groups. The Men's sections were 11 round Swisses, the Women's were 9 rounds.

    • 93 players competed in the Open 50+. At 2650 the top seed was GM Julio Granda Zuniga (Peru), and he won with 9.5/11, a full point ahead of GMs Antonio Gogelio (PHI) and Eric Prie (FRA).
    • 165 players competed in the Open 65+. GM Evgeny Sveshnikov (RUS) won with 8.5/11, a half-point ahead of a group of 9 players -- including Olympiad ironman Eugenio Torre -- which was topped on tie-breaks by GMs Anatoly Vaisser (FRA) and Vlastimil Jansa (CZE)
    • 22 women played in the Women's 50+ section, which was won by WGM Elvira Berend (LUX) with 7/9.
    • 15 women played in the Women's 65+ section, which finished with Georgian WGM Tamar Khmiadashvili and GM (and former Women's World Champion) Nona Gaprindashvili a full point ahead of the field with 7.5/9. Khmiadashvili won their individual game, and so took the title on tie-break.

    Three Canadians played, all in the 65+ section:

    1. IM Leon Piasetski +4 =5 -2;  6.5/11; 37th
    2. William Doubleday +5 =0 -6; 5/11; 105th
    3. Andre Zybura +2 =5 -4; 4.5/11; 120th

    Links

    FIDE Report
    https://www.fide.com/component/content/article/1-fide-news/10506-27th-senior-chess-championship-acqui-terme-2017.html

    Results
    http://www.chess-results.com/tnr282186.aspx?lan=1&art=4&wi=821

    Photos
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/CZuUTJHeW4CcDDtQ2

    photo: IM Leon Piasetski, by Gerhard Bertagnolli


     

     IM Leon Piasetski by Gerhard Bertagnolli

    () - ()
     
     Round:  Result:
    [Event "World Senior +65"]
    [Site "Acqui Terme"]
    [Date "2017.11.16"]
    [Round "9"]
    [White "Piasetski, Leon"]
    [Black "Pashayan, Genrikh"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "A11"]
    [WhiteElo "2269"]
    [BlackElo "1953"]
    [Annotator "Leon Piasetski"]
    [PlyCount "77"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    [SourceTitle "CFC Newsfeed"]
    
    {Acqui Terme has a classic centre dating back to Roman times, a few spas and
    is surrounded by vinyards. However, my main focus was on chess and I spent
    most of my free time on prep. Despite the results not meeting my expectations,
    I did play a few good games. My best effort was against Pashayan from Armenia.
    Typically, most seniors have a lot of experience and can play a reasonable
    game even if their rating has fallen from their peak years. However, my
    opponent was a bit of a mystery since there were few games of his in the
    database. Nevertheless, coming from Armenia I expected him to put up a lot of
    resistance.} 1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 g6 4. c4 c6 5. b3 Bg7 6. Bb2 O-O 7. O-O
    {I chose a classic Reti opening against his fianchetto defense. From the few
    games available I knew he played solidly but his next few moves seemed a bit
    odd ...} Re8 8. Qc2 a5 9. d3 Na6 10. a3 Qb6 11. Nbd2 Bg4 {[#] Black has
    developed his pieces but the knight on a6 is not too impressive ... I spent a
    while figuring out the best way to approach the task at hand. Finally I
    realized that it would be optimal to achieve b4 at some point and so found a
    job for my rook. Of course, 12. h3 was an option but it turns out that my
    opponent neded little encouragement to rid himsef of his bishop.} 12. Rab1 Bxf3
    $2 ({Black should focus on getting in ...e5 ASAP and with 12. ... Nd7 Black
    could achieve this right away. Instead he chose to give up his bishop and
    solidify his central stand with 13. ...e6. Best was} 12... Nd7 13. Bxg7 Kxg7
    14. b4 axb4 15. axb4 Nc7 16. Rfc1 $14 (16. c5 Qa7 17. Qb2+ e5 18. Ra1 Qb8 19.
    Rxa8 Qxa8 20. e4 dxe4 21. dxe4 Nb5 $11 {although white still has an edge.}))
    13. Nxf3 e6 14. e3 c5 {Finally, my opponent decides to challenge my central
    control but with his knight stuck on the rim, prospects are ... not so great :
    -)} 15. Rfc1 Qd6 16. Be5 {Possibly better was 16.Ne5 but I wanted to line up
    my queen and bishop on the long diagonal for maximum pressure.} Qe7 17. Qb2
    Rac8 18. d4 {[#]} Red8 $6 {Black had two alternatives:} (18... cxd4 $6 19. Bxd4
    Nc5 20. Ne5 Red8 $16 (20... Nfd7 $2 21. Nxd7 Nd3 22. Nf6+ $18)) (18... b6 19.
    Qe2 Qb7 20. Bf1 $1 Nb8 21. cxd5 Nxd5 (21... exd5 22. Bh3 Rc6 (22... Nbd7 23.
    Qb5 Red8 24. dxc5 Rxc5 25. Rxc5 Nxc5 26. Rc1 Nfe4 27. b4) 23. Qb5 cxd4 24. Bxf6
    Bxf6 25. Rxc6 Qxc6 26. Qxc6 Nxc6 27. Bd7) 22. dxc5 bxc5 23. Bxg7 Kxg7 24. Qb2+
    Kg8 25. Ne5 {but White is much better in any case.}) 19. cxd5 exd5 20. Bf1 $2 {
    Nothing wrong with Bf1, but Bh3 was much stronger ...} (20. Bh3 Rc6 21. Bf1 Nb8
    22. dxc5 Nbd7 23. Bd6 $16 {Now White threatens to capture on a6 and then on c5
    which wins a pawn because the queen must protect both c5 and f6.}) 20... cxd4
    21. Bxa6 bxa6 22. Bxd4 Ne8 23. Ne5 {Simpler was} (23. Rxc8 Rxc8 24. Rc1 Bxd4
    25. Nxd4 Rc5 26. a4 $16 {but the long diagonal optics were tempting.}) 23...
    Qb7 (23... Qe6 24. a4 $14) 24. Nd3 $2 (24. Qd2 $16 Rxc1+ (24... Qb5 25. a4 $16)
    25. Rxc1 Qxb3 26. Qxa5 $16) 24... Qb5 $2 (24... Bxd4 25. Qxd4 Rxc1+ 26. Rxc1
    Qxb3 $11) {[#]} 25. Nc5 {This was my idea: put the knight in a dominating
    position where it attacks the weakened queenside.} ({Better was}25. Rd1 $1 Bxd4 26.
    Qxd4 Ng7 27. b4 Nf5 (27... Rc4 28. Qf6 $18) 28. Qf4 Rc4 29. Qf3 h5 30. bxa5
    Qxa5 31. Nb4 d4 32. e4 Ne7 (32... Nd6 33. Nd5 $18) 33. Qf6 $16) 25... Rc6 ({
    I allowed} 25... Rxc5 26. Rxc5 Qxc5 27. Bxc5 Bxb2 28. Rxb2 {since the bishop
    is much stronger than the knight. However, here it was best to give up the
    c-file and build up pressure on the weak d-pawn.}) 26. a4 Qb8 (26... Qb6 27.
    Nd3 $14) 27. Rc2 $2 {I saw the upcoming tactic based on black doubling rooks
    but missed the simple defense 27. ... Bd4 28. exd4 ( or 28. Qxd4 Qb4) Nd6 29.
    Qc3 Nf5 30. Rd1 Qb6 which equalizes. Instead white should play} (27. Nd3 Bxd4 (
    27... Rdc8 28. Rxc6 Rxc6 29. Bxg7 Nxg7 30. Nf4 Qd6 31. Rd1 Rc5 32. e4) 28. Qxd4
    Rxc1+ 29. Rxc1 Qxb3 30. Rc6 Qb7 31. Rb6 Qa8 32. Nc5 Rd6 33. Rb7 Rc6 34. Re7 $16
    ) 27... Rdc8 $2 ({Better was} 27... Bxd4 28. exd4 Nd6 29. Qc3 Nf5 30. Rd1 Qb6 $11) 28.
    Rbc1 {[#]} Qb4 $2 (28... Bxd4 29. Qxd4 Rd8 30. Rc3 $16) 29. Bxg7 Nxg7 (29...
    Rxc5 30. Rxc5 Rxc5 31. Rxc5 Qxc5 32. Qc3 Qe7 33. Bd4 $18) 30. Ne6 $1 {A
    pleasing geometrical motif ! I had foreseen taking on a6 which wins a pawn but
    this is of course much stronger.} fxe6 31. Rxc6 Rf8 32. Qe5 {Centralizing with
    threats ...} Qg4 33. Rc7 Nh5 34. Rc8 Qf3 35. Qxe6+ Kg7 36. Rxf8 Qxf8 37. Rc7+
    Kh6 38. Qxd5 Qb4 39. h4 {Although I was disappointed with my overall
    performance in Acqui Terme, this game at least improved my spirits. Perhaps
    next time my result will also improve!} 1-0
    merida
    46

     

    Author: John Upper
    Posted: November 22, 2017, 9:57 pm

    Chess.com Speed Chess Championship
    Nov. 21, 2017. (10am Pacific, 1pm EST)

    Magnus Carlsen plays Alexander Grischuk in the first semi-final of the Chess.com Speed Chess Championship. Magnus is the defending Champion and huge favourite, but Alex is a former World Blitz Champion and a notorious time-trouble addict, which has given him more than the usual preparation for a blitz match.

    The winner goes to the final against the winner of the match between Hikaru Nakamura and Sergey Karjakin.

    The format for the Chess.com matches is 3 hours of online play, broken into four formats:

    1. 90 minutes of 5+2 blitz, 
    2. 60 minutes of 3+2 blitz,
    3. 30 minutes of 1+1 bullet,
    4. one chess960 game in each time control. 

    Live Games (IM Danny Rensch and GM Robert Hess)

    https://www.chess.com/tv

    http://www.twitch.tv/Chess


    More Magnus

    While in Germany last week for the Play Magnus Live Challenge, the World Champion took part in two additional PR events.

    The serious one was a live interview with Die Zeit journalist Ulrich Stock on artificial intelligence:
    https://youtu.be/gmpUSAlj7F8

     The stupid one was to play a game against a self-professed super-learner who claimed he had set himself the challenge to learn one challenging skill per month, and his last challenge was learning chess in one month well enough to beat the World Champion.

    The fact that the event happened -- Magnus played him -- and that it got some serious-faced coverage (see below) is so ludicrous as to be fascinating. A few thoughts:

    • Imagine a novice claimed to have spent a month learning tennis and challeneged Roger Federer to a set. Any interest in seeing that?  From his first awkward serve it would be obvious to even the tennis-ignorant that he had no chance. Is it just because chess skills are harder to see than physical skills that someone might imagine chess could be mastered in a month? What do you suppose people who believe this think about other types of intellectual skills -- e.g. in business or politics -- do they think those can be mastered in a month?
    • Why set the bar so rediculously high: wouldn't a draw against an IM be impressive enough?
    • Imagine a club-level chess player who thought this was possible: what would that say about their opinion of lowly FMs and IMs who have spent years studying chess but still have no chance against Carlsen? 
    • The self-promoting super-learner claimed he was developing  "an algorithm" that would enable him to beat Carlsen... but hadn't finished it at the time of the match. But such algorithms already exist -- you can download the source-code to one of them here: https://stockfish.s3.amazonaws.com/stockfish-8-src.zip -- but just like the very first chess program ever made (by Alan Turing) it runs way too slowly on wetware. So this fellow wasn't just fantasizing about besting Carlsen in a month, but also about his ability to create a world-class chess-playing program -- which would be so simple that it could be run by a human brain -- also in only one month.

    At the risk of underestimating the gung-ho super-powered self-improvement of the Bay Area entrepreneur jump-off-a-cliff-and-build-your-airplane-on-the-way-down crowd, I will ask the rude question: wouldn't such accomplishments take at least a month-and-a-half?

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/chess-novice-challenged-magnus-carlsen-1510866214


    Palma de Mallorca, Grand Prix

    November 16-25, 2017.

    An 18 player, 9-round Swiss featuring some of the world's best players and which will determine the last two qualifiers for the Candidate's Final. 

    After 5 rounds, Lev Aronian leads with 3.5. MVL (3/5) and Radjabov (2.5/5) still have chances to qualify.

    The event is sponsored by Agon, which is restricting live video to its pay $ite
    www.worldchess.com

    Post game interviews can be found for free on its facebook page:
    https://www.facebook.com/theworldchess/videos/1548644415212331/



    TCEC Season 10 Superfinal: Houdini vs Komodo

    November 20 - ??, 2017.

    The TCEC Superfinal started late Sunday night/Monday morning: 100 games between Houdini 6.03 and a development build of Komodo on  an exceptionally powerful 44 core Xeon server. After 5 games, Houdini leads Komodo +1 =4 -0.

    Houdini and Komodo tied atop the eight engine quad-round robin with 18.5/28. Last year's champion Stockfish was 1/2 a point behind. Interestingly, Stockfish was the only undefeated engine, and beat Komodo head-to-head +1 =3, but gave too many draws to the lower finishers. Perhaps a lesson about raising the "contempt" value during the round robin!?

    TCEC

    The only computer chess event that matters is the Thoresen Chess Engine Competion. Engines play on identical hardware and use identical opening books, making it the best test of playing strength. It's also the event that the engine developers take seriously, with the top ones submitting development builds of their best programs, including Stockfish, Komodo, Houdini, and Fire.

    This year's big innovation is the upgraded hardware: an exceptionally powerful 44 core Xeon server, more than double the power last year's host.

    Like it or not, this tournament will have a strong claim to featuring the best chess ever played.

    TCEC Season 10 consists of three stages:  

    1. Stage 1: 24 engines; single round robin; TC: 60m + 10s. 
    2. Stage 2: The top 8 engines from stage 1 play a quadruple RR; TC: 90m + 10s.
    3. Superfinal: Top 2 from stage 2 play a 100 game match.

    With the exception of stage 1, engines play both sides of each opening book position.

    Info:
    http://www.chessdom.com/komodo-houdini-is-the-superfinal-of-tcec-season-10/

    Live Games  24/7:
    http://tcec.chessdom.com/live.php

    Author: John Upper
    Posted: November 21, 2017, 7:58 pm

    Our Game of the Week is from the National Capital Open, where 2017 Canadian Champion GM Bator Sambuev was White against Svitlana Demchenko

    White is up a pawn, but Black's Rook is ready to counter-attack; what should White play? Complete game and notes below.


    2017 National Capital Open

    61 players competed in the National Capital Open, November 10-12, 2017 at the RA Centre in Ottawa. The Open section had 6 Masters, topped by Canadian Champon GM Bator Sambuev, who also topped the final standings:

    1. GM Bator Sambuev won the Open section with 4.5/5.  ($500)
    2. Svitlana Demchenko was clear second with 4/5.  ($300)
    3. David Gordon and Sam Marin were =3-4 with 3.5/5. ($70 each)

    U1900
    Larry Ju and Jean Bigras 4/5  ($260 each)

    U1600
    Alexandre Khan was clear first with 4.5/5. ($240)

    Links

    results and games:
    http://forum.chesstalk.com/showthread.php?16348-2017-National-Capital-Open-November-10-11-12&p=119421&viewfull=1#post119421

    photos:
    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1503565379728727.1073741863.731717656913507&type=1&l=1dc57b26ba

    Thanks to TD and Org. Halldor Palsson for running the tournament and posting the games online.

     


    ..

    () - ()
     
     Round:  Result:
    [Event "National Capital Open"]
    [Site "RA Centre"]
    [Date "2017.11.11"]
    [Round "3"]
    [White "Sambuev, Bator"]
    [Black "Demchenko, Svitlana"]
    [Result "1/2-1/2"]
    [ECO "A14"]
    [WhiteElo "2618"]
    [BlackElo "2222"]
    [Annotator "John Upper"]
    [PlyCount "104"]
    [EventDate "2017.??.??"]
    
    1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 e6 3. g3 Nf6 4. Bg2 Be7 5. O-O O-O 6. b3 c5 7. e3 Nc6 8. Bb2 {
    [#]} b6 {By far the most popular move, but not the best scoring.} ({Tony
    Kosten, who has played and published about this c4/Bg2 opening for years,
    recommends} 8... d4 {going into a kind of reversed Benoni structure} 9. exd4
    cxd4 10. Re1 Ne8 $1 {aiming to shore up the center with ...f6 and ...e5.} 11.
    Ne5 Nxe5 12. Rxe5 f6 13. Re1 e5 {with several games, including Giri,A (2782)
    -Nakamura,H (2787) Paris, 2016 (½-½, 35).}) 9. Nc3 Bb7 10. cxd5 Nxd5 (10...
    exd5 {is playable, but White gets an easy-to-play game against the hanging
    pawns after} 11. d4 $1 {with lots of examples, including the model game:
    Kramnik,V (2795)-Jones,G (2644) London, 2012 (1-0, 49).}) 11. Nxd5 Qxd5 12. d4
    {[#] This position has been reached hundreds of times from various move orders.
    Black is ahead in development, but White will gain time with a free hit on the
    Qd5. Strategically, White hopes to get the B pair or to saddle Black with a
    weak pawn on c5. Statistically, White scores nearly 70%, which is great, but a
    less-impressive +50 Elo, which suggests this is a position that higher-rated
    White's aim for in the hopes of squeezing out a technical win.} Rfd8 $6 {
    since the e-file isn't likely to open It looks normal to aim to play Rac8 and
    Rfd8; OTOH, now Bxb7 will gain a tempo on the Ra8, and f7 is less well
    defended, a fact Bator pounces on. Black's alternatives:} (12... cxd4 $4 {
    avoids the weak pawn on c5, but loses an exchange after:} 13. Nxd4 $18 Qd7 (
    13... Qxg2+ 14. Kxg2 Nxd4+ 15. f3 $18) 14. Nxc6 Bxc6 15. Qxd7 Bxd7 16. Bxa8 $18
    ) (12... Rad8 13. Ne5 Qd6 14. dxc5 Qxc5 15. Qe2 Nxe5 16. Bxb7 {With the Ra8
    now safely on d8, Black has time to develop and force off one of the white Bs.}
    Bf6 17. Rfd1 Ng4 18. Bxf6 Nxf6 19. Qa6 Ng4 $6 (19... Rxd1+ $142 20. Rxd1 Qc2
    $11 21. Bf3 Ne4 (21... h5 $5 22. Qxa7 $2 Ne4 $17) (21... g5 $5) 22. Qe2 Qxe2
    23. Bxe2 Nc3 $11) 20. h3 Ne5 21. Qxa7 h5 22. Qa4 b5 23. Qa5 Rxd1+ 24. Rxd1 h4
    25. gxh4 $16 {1-0 (40) Botvinnik/Polugajevsky -Keres,P/Prins,L Amsterdam 
    (exhibition), 1966.}) (12... Qf5 13. Ne5 Nxe5 14. Bxb7 Rad8 15. Qe2 Qd3 16. Ba6
    Qxe2 17. Bxe2 cxd4 18. Bxd4 Nc6 19. Bc3 Ba3 20. Rab1 Nb4 21. Bb2 Bxb2 22. Rxb2
    Rc8 23. Rd1 Rfd8 $11 {Rapport,R (2691)-Wei,Y (2607) Gibraltar, 2014.}) 13. Ne5
    Qd6 14. Qh5 Nxe5 (14... g6 15. Qf3 Nxe5 16. Qxb7 Nd3 17. Ba3 $14) 15. Bxb7 Rab8
    16. dxc5 (16. dxe5 Qd2 {Only move.} 17. Rab1 (17. Bc1 Qc3 {Only move.} $15) 17... Rxb7 $11) (16.
    Be4 Ng6 17. Ba3 $14) 16... Qxc5 {[#]} 17. Rfc1 $5 {Always a difficult choice,
    using this R keeps a2 defended.} Nc4 $1 (17... g6 {gives up a pawn, but Black
    gets enough play for it after} 18. Rxc5 gxh5 19. Rxe5 Rxb7 (19... Bf6 $4 20.
    Ba6 $18 {the Bs will run riot across the open center.}) 20. Rxh5 Rd2 {with counterplay.}) 18.
    Qg4 Qg5 $1 19. Rxc4 Rxb7 {Only move.} 20. Qf3 Qd5 {Only move.} (20... Rbd7 $4 21. Rg4 $18) 21. e4
    Qg5 (21... Qd3 {is playable, but very tricky since there are lines where the Q
    gets trapped on the d-file:} 22. Qg4 Bf8 23. Bf6 $1 h5 $1 24. Qg5 Re8 (24...
    Ra8 25. Qxh5 b5 (25... gxf6 $4 26. Rd1 $18)) 25. Qxh5 gxf6 $4 26. Rd1 $18 {
    trapping the Q.}) 22. h4 Qg6 23. Rd1 Rbd7 (23... Rxd1+ 24. Qxd1 h5 $14) 24.
    Rxd7 Rxd7 25. Rc8+ Rd8 (25... Bd8 26. Qc3 Qg4 $1 27. Kh2 (27. Qc7 $4 Qd1+ $19)
    27... h5 $13) 26. h5 $1 Qg5 27. Rc7 a5 28. h6 $16 e5 29. hxg7 Kxg7 {[#]} 30.
    Qf4 $5 {Pretty, but probably not best} (30. Rb7 $1 {increases the pressure
    before trading Qs.} Rd6 (30... Bc5 $4 31. Qxf7+) 31. Qf4 Re6 32. Qf5 $1 {
    Black is getting choked, and White threatens Kg2 then f4}) 30... Qxf4 31. gxf4
    Kf8 $16 (31... Bd6 32. Rc6 (32. Rb7 $1 Kf8 33. Rxb6 Bc5 34. Rb5 Bxf2+ $16)
    32... f6 33. fxe5 Bxe5 (33... fxe5 $2 34. Rxd6 $18) 34. Bxe5 fxe5 35. Rxb6 a4
    $5 $16 {looks close to winning for White.}) 32. Bxe5 Bd6 33. Bxd6+ (33. Bf6 $4
    Bxc7 34. Bxd8 Bxd8 $19) 33... Rxd6 {[#]White is up a pawn, but Black's R is
    ready to counter-attack; what should White play?} 34. Rc2 $2 (34. Kg2 $142 Rd2
    35. Rb7 $16) (34. Rc3 {lets White save all his pawns, but makes his R very
    inactive:} Rg6+ 35. Kf1 (35. Rg3 Rd6) 35... Rg4 36. Rf3 Rh4) (34. f5 $142 $1 {
    keeping this pawn gives White more control over Black's K and this looks good
    enough to win:} Rd4 35. f3 Rd1+ 36. Kg2 Rd2+ 37. Kg3 Rxa2 38. f6 $18) 34...
    Rg6+ $1 35. Kh2 (35. Kf1 Rg4 36. Ke2 (36. f5 Rxe4 37. f6 Re6 38. Rc8+ Re8 39.
    Rc6 (39. Rxe8+ $4 {and the f6-pawn drops at the start of a losing pawn ending.}
    ) 39... Re6 $11) 36... Rxf4 37. Ke3 Rg4 38. Rc8+ (38. Rc6 Rg6 $11) 38... Kg7
    39. Rb8 Rg6 40. Rb7 h5 $11) 35... Rg4 36. e5 Rxf4 37. Kg3 Re4 38. f4 a4 $1 39.
    Kg4 axb3 40. axb3 {[#]} Kg7 (40... Rb4 41. Kf5 Kg7 42. Rc7 Kf8 $11 {should
    also draw, but is not so clear cut.}) 41. Rc4 Re1 (41... Rxc4 42. bxc4 Kg6 {Only move.}
    43. f5+ {Only move.} Kg7 44. Kf4 (44. Kg5 $4 f6+ 45. exf6+ Kf7 $19) 44... h6 {Only move.} 45. Kg4
    Kf8 46. Kh4 Kg8 {Only move.} 47. f6 Kh8 {Only move.} 48. Kg4 Kg8 $11) 42. Rb4 Rg1+ 43. Kf3 (43. Kf5
    h5 44. Rxb6 h4 45. Rd6 (45. Rb7 $4 h3 $19 46. e6 h2 47. e7 (47. Rxf7+ Kg8 $19)
    47... h1=Q 48. e8=Q Qh3+ 49. Ke4 Re1+ $19) 45... h3 46. Rd2 Rg2 47. Rd3 h2 48.
    Rh3 Rb2 $11) 43... h5 44. f5 Rf1+ 45. Ke4 h4 46. Kd5 Rxf5 47. Rxh4 f6 $11 48.
    Re4 {[#]} Kf7 $1 {The pin leaves gives Black time to improve her K before
    making exchanges.} 49. b4 (49. Kd6 Rxe5 50. Rxe5 fxe5 51. Kxe5 Ke7 $11) 49...
    Ke7 50. b5 (50. Kc6 Rxe5 51. Rd4 $11 (51. Rxe5+ $4 fxe5 52. Kd5 Kf6 {Only move.} 53. Ke4
    Ke6 54. b5 Kd6 $19) 51... b5 52. Rd5 Ke6 $11) 50... Kd7 51. Re1 Rxe5+ 52. Rxe5
    fxe5 (52... fxe5 53. Kxe5 Ke7 {Only move.} $11) 1/2-1/2
    merida
    46

    ..

     

     

     

     

    Author: John Upper
    Posted: November 13, 2017, 11:44 pm